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10

Have you tried adding the kernel options "acpi=off apm=off" to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT in /etc/default/grub? Then run sudo update-grub and reboot your computer.


9

On my system I can obtain the power drawn from the battery from cat /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/power_now 9616000 The value seems to be in µW, though. You can convert it with any tool you're comfortable with, e.g. awk: awk '{print $1*10^-6 " W"}' /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/power_now 9.616 W


8

Computers generally don't track the current they are drawing. It is common that there are voltage sensors that are readable. Power consumption can vary widely over time depending on workload. CPUs now throttle back when load is low. Disks will shutdown when idle. Tools like powertop will track processes which trigger increases in power consumption. ...


8

This seems to be a known bug and you can read more detail on launchpad as well as on ubuntuforums. The issue is that somehow gnome-power-manager and the xset commands conflict with each other. The solution is to run xset dpms force off in a loop, a python script pretty much works for most of us. Give it a try, and see how it goes.


7

This is not a out-of-the-box solution but it will possibly work if no one other comes up with a solution :-) You can manipulate the power management settings with the command pmset. See the manpage for more information about it. The interesting setting we want to manipulate is sleep: sleep - system sleep timer (value in minutes, or 0 to disable) ...


6

The fade out is probably the screensaver kicking in. Try to disable it by going to System->Preferences->Look and Feel->Screensaver and disabling "Activate screensaver when computer is idle" if indeed the active screen saver is "Blank screen". The fact that the fading out can't be interrupted is a bug it seems. E.g. Fedora has a bugreport stating it is a ...


6

xset dpms force off works for most X setups.


6

Powertop is not a permanent tool, as you know, so you will have to setup your system to run the commands through sysctl, udev, systemd units, scripts, whatever... In order to see what commands are used by powertop you will have to run powertop --html BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES, that is, BEFORE toggling the settings from Bad to Good. If you already tuned for ...


6

Here's a small script that checks for the battery level and calls a custom command, here pm-hibernate, in case the battery level is below a certain threshold. #!/bin/sh ########################################################################### # # Usage: system-low-battery # # Checks if the battery level is low. If “low_threshold” is exceeded # a system ...


5

But if your computer actually keeps track of power (e.g. notebook), than on kernel 3.8.11 you can use the command below. It returns power measured in miliwatts. cat /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/power_now This works on kernel 3.8.11 (Ubuntu Quantal mainline generic).


5

Does the power strip do anything beyond read the +5V a connected USB port provides? (Do you see anything in dmesg when you attach it? Does the output of lsusb change after you plug it in?) If not, the kernel may not even recognize that anything is attached. You can't tell a device to suspend if it never enumerates itself: it would never show up under ...


5

You need to change the DPMS settings, which are controllable with xset. You can disable all DPMS with: $ xset -dpms And re-enable them with: $ xset +dpms You can also control how long before the monitor switches into each state (standby, suspend, and off; they're explained in this Wikipedia article) by passing 3 integers for the number of seconds ...


5

I doubt that LXDE vs GNOME will make a significant difference, but I don't have hard figures. I doubt less that the default configuration of LXDE and the default configuration of GNOME will make some difference. To keep power consumption down, turn off desktop effects (animations, anything 3D). Make sure you're not running any kind of “screen saver”. Most ...


5

I haven't got the time for all details now, but see the GNOME Power Manager's FAQ "How do I make my application stop the computer auto-suspending" which points to the Inhibit() and UnInhibit() DBus-calls. A caveat: if the process calling Inhibit() exits, the inhibition is ended - dbus-send in a Shell script thus won't do, but some wrapper script (e.g. in ...


5

Regular solution In principle, the solutions above : setting desktop-provided power management -- or xset -dpms ; xset s off for a one-time test disabling/uninstalling desktop-provided screensaver and checking/killing existing one to be sure (like pgrep screensaver etc.) ...should be enough. Don't add acpi=off to grub for this, it is off-topic here. ...


5

The ACPI block depends on PCI being enabled. Symbol: ACPI [=y] ... Depends on: !IA64_HP_SIM && (IA64 || X86 [=y]) && PCI [=y] If you disabled PCI (or didn't enable it), or selected a different architecture, you won't see any options related to ACPI.


5

Sounds like you want suspend-to-both/hybrid suspend which should do all the steps of hibernating, including writing RAM to disk, but not actually turn the machine off; instead, it'll go into S3 (standby). If you wake the machine up before the battery dies, it'll be fairly quick; if the battery dies, it'll be just as if you'd hibernated it.


5

Potential Method #1 I think you can do it with these commands: disable echo 0 > /sys/bus/pci/slots/$N/power enable echo 1 > /sys/bus/pci/slots/$N/power Where $N is the number of the PCI slot. lspci -vv may help to identify the device. This is not very well documented... Potential Method #2 I came across this thread on U&L, similar ...


5

You can use vbetool to turn the display on/off from the console. off: $ sudo vbetool dpms off on: $ sudo vbetool dpms on This command construct will turn it off, and then if you hit a key turn it back on: $ sudo sh -c 'vbetool dpms off; read ans; vbetool dpms on' References [SOLVED] How to turn off monitor at CLI Turn off monitor using command ...


5

The command run when your computer is running low on battery should be configurable through your desktop environment's GUI. Just open the settings app of whatever you use and look at the power options, you should have something like (this is on Cinnamon): To make your user able to run these commands without entering a password, run sudo visudo to edit ...


4

I don't think most servers introspect their power consumption, at least not in a form that Linux can access. You might have better luck querying the servers' LOM modules (if any), but I usually get this kind of information from remote power strips.


4

There may be. Some 'proprietary' extensions which allow to operate on battery. For example tp-smapi patchset allows to set the maximum charging threshold for thinkpads. Setting it to 0 would prevent it from charging. Some laptops may not have that possibility in BIOS so you need to post details about hardware to receive any details.


4

Since Mac OS X 10.8, you should be able to use the caffeinate(8) command. Try caffeinate -s ssh server.example.com.


4

The program powertop should help you identify the problem. $ sudo yum -y install powertop $ sudo powertop Look at the various output, and then arrow-key over to the rightmost "tab", Tunables. Look at the things which are "bad", and press enter to fix them. Also, on the first Overview screen, look for any egregiously bad processes that might be ...


4

The very important thing is to lower down the cpu clock first. The second important part is to verify there is no physical cooling problem (like dust on the fans, cat or dog hairs in the heatsink ect) On most computers, the fan speed is directly operated by the bios or the os automatically. The cleaning/lowering cpu speed process should let the cooling ...


4

Make sure your BIOS is set to restart the system after a power failure. Turn off auto login unless you have a really good reason for it to be enabled. You shouldn't really need to be interactively logged on for any server type programs to function. Especially if you can get into the system remotely there is no reason for it. For most any program you need ...


4

At that point, I would think about using a power monitor to measure the load on the computer at any time. You could hook up your computer or surge protector to something like Tweet-a-Watt and then keep track of the metrics from there on a per day/week/month basis. I imagine you could use ACPI/APM to monitor some aspects (and mayhaps power, as well) of the ...


4

I think there's a power utilization regression that was introduced in 3.6.x. If you can, stick with the older kernel. Supposedly, there's also an ext4 metadata block corruption bug in 3.6.2 as well, so it might be worth waiting.


4

After disabling SMART scrubbing (automatic offline testing), with smartctl --offlineauto=off /dev/sdx the drive is now entering "standby". Note: offlineauto=off value is saved in the drive, surviving reboots and power outages. Thanks to ...


4

write a script! battery_level=`acpi -b | grep -P -o '[0-9]+(?=%)'` if [ $battery_level -le 10 ] then notify-send "Battery low" "Battery level is ${battery_level}%!" fi then cron it to run every few minutes or so. But yeah, if you can do it through the GUI, that's probably a much better way of doing it.



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