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12

You can use vim. vim -c hardcopy -c quit /path/to/file This will print the file and quit immediately. By default, vim prints with syntax highlighting. If you need to print from stdout of some command, you can do this: cat some_file.c | vim -c hardcopy -c 'quit!' - If you want to save the .ps for later, you can do that by adding redirection to the ...


4

You need to tell groff which macros you want to use. In this case, you want groff -ge -me -mwww grnexmpl.me > out.ps If you want to see the picture of the circuit diagram, you'll also need grnexample.g present in the directory. I found this by running grog to guess the macros, and then added the www macro, since I could see there was HTML in the ...


4

Use a command like: gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -dSAFER -sOutputFile=sin_800.pdf *.eps


4

There are several programs that pretty-print various programming languages to Postscript, which don't require any third-party software to run: a2ps enscript trueprint If you are willing to go via LaTeX, you have more options. Going via LaTeX is mostly useful if you want to include code and something else in the same document; otherwise it's overkill. ...


4

In general, you can use open from the terminal to open any file with its default application (see this SO question). open is Mac OS-specific. On GNU/Linux, the equivalent is usually xdg-open. Also, for your reference, you can try to find out what type of file a file really is (regardless of its extension) using the file command.


3

In my experience the better way to manipulate PDF is via Inkscape. If the PDF is well structured (not true everytime...) you can select the elements and manipulate them, like zooming or changing the font size: (This example is from a not-so-well-behaved PDF, though).


3

You could use the open source software Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com). It is available for OSX, Windows, and Linux. Input Formats: CBZ, CBR, CBC, CHM, DJVU, EPUB, FB2, HTML, HTMLZ, LIT, LRF, MOBI, ODT, PDF, PRC, PDB, PML, RB, RTF, SNB, TCR, TXT, TXTZ Output Formats: AZW3, EPUB, FB2, OEB, LIT, LRF, MOBI, HTMLZ, PDB, PML, RB, PDF, RTF, SNB, ...


2

An awesome shell script written some time ago by a friend: livre. You'll be interested in the --book and --inner options.


2

This is the pseudo solution I used, now. My editor didn't seem to care whether to receive eps or tiff files, so I rendered all svgs with the target resolution and size, as it was impossible to get a decent result with eps files (as noted in the comments this is due to technical limitations of the eps format). This can be done by opening the svg directly in ...


2

If it's a PostScript printer, surely the raw printer output is already PostScript...? Basic PostScript is human-readable. Take a look at the start of the file and see if it starts with %! or %!PS-2 or similar...


2

From my past experiences with a2ps, it doesn't handle wrapping in an intelligent manner. So you have to present your text file already formatted to the proper width & wrapping, before handing it off to a2ps. If your system has enscript installed I'd make use of that instead. Googleing for "word wrap a2ps" will lead you to this article titled: Printing ...


2

Some people have had success with png2eps. Remember that whatever system you use to convert PNG to EPS it will be a tradeoff between image quality and file size. PNG is a compressed bitmap format while EPS is uncompressed vector graphics - the two formats couldn't be more different. There is no resolution in a vector image until you attempt to convert it ...


2

Cedilla is a text-to-postscript converter, similar to enscript and a2ps, with good Unicode support but a lot fewer configuration possibilities. I don't think Cedilla can to multi-column. If you want fine control over the formatting, you can use LaTeX. LaTeX's support for going beyond 8 bits is a bit problematic, but tools now exist to typeset Chinese fairly ...


1

Files with the .eps extension are usually encapsulated postscript. You can view them with gv: gv t-0.8.eps Or with your favorite PDF viewer: evince t-0.8.eps Or even with an image editor gimp t-0.8.eps


1

If it is some non-postscript printer, you are out of luck. PostScript is a page description language, which describes curves by curves. The raw input to the printer is most probably some raster format. In the best case you'll get a pixelated rendering of the image. Or ir might be some somewhat higher level language, but Im' not aware of any reverse ...


1

According to this page, the default paper size is read from the PAGE environment variable. But for on-screen viewing of manpages, have you considered something like man2html?


1

The DDST is a GDI or Raster printer driver. It uses the computers hardware to RIP the data and send the Raster (Raw image data) to the printer. These printers do not accept PCL, PostScript or HPGL data. You must use the DDST driver for the printer to work.



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