New answers tagged

3

According to the open group POSIX awk supports BEGIN, therefore it can be done in awk: awk -v MYEND=6 'BEGIN { for(i=1;i<=MYEND;i++) print i }' Where -v MYEND=6 would stand for the assignment as in the first argument to seq. In other words, this works too: END=6 for i in `awk -v MYEND=$END 'BEGIN { for(i=1;i<=MYEND;i++) print i }'`; do echo $i ...


2

I ended up writing one in ksh a while ago; it's not as bullet-proof as it could be, because I wrote it for myself, but it should be a good start. Not sure it'd work with pure Bourne shell, as your Q is currently tagged, because of the $(( )) syntax. #!/usr/bin/ksh start=1 end=1 step=1 case $# in 0) echo Usage: $0 '[Start [Step]] ...


0

STREAMS is a nice api from a userspace programmer's point of view, but it is a horror from the kernel side. It cannot be implemented in any way that is remotely performant. Systems which have implemented STREAMS have moved away from it years ago for that reason. POSIX just documents the current state of affairs.


2

Well STREAMS does include an API. Surely they'd be in scope for standardization if the concept was adopted widely, used by portable applications etc. The lore from the mouths of Linux hackers is that STREAMS was dead by 1994, and only remained in existence for backwards compatibility. (Of the API). https://lkml.org/lkml/1998/6/28/138 It was originally ...


2

unlike FAT the filesystems used by UNIX don't have a special size limit on the root directory, but once the partition is full you won't be able to add more.


8

There is no limitation to the number of entries in a directory, either in POSIX or in typical Unix implementations. There may be an indirect limit for the number of subdirectories, which is the maximum hard link count (each subdirectory's .. entry is a hard link to the directory); that's 216 for many common filesystems, which limits a directory to 65533 ...


13

In 10.1 Directory Structure and Files, POSIX lists directories which must exist. But it specifies no limit on the number of other directories which can exist at the root-level of a filesystem. For that matter, it does not appear to place limits on the size of other directories. POSIX's attention in this area is focused on commonality rather than ...


16

According to The Open Group's published standard, the only required directories are: / /dev, which contains console, null, and tty /tmp, guaranteed writable but not necessarily preserved. The Linux Foundation maintains a Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS) which extends this to include the directories you will typically see on a Linux system: /bin:...


3

No. Money. Most Linux distributions are mostly POSIX compliant, but there's no formal POSIX stamp on them since nobody thinks it's a good idea to either go through that procedure, or pay the required fees, or both. Getting a POSIX certification would mean that it would be e.g. "Debian, version 8, on amd64" that was certified. Then you'd need to certify "...



Top 50 recent answers are included