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4

You have mistaken the output of at least one command. The permissions of a symbolic link are always rwxrwxrwx, or rather they don't have permissions at all: $ touch file $ ls -l total 0 -rw-rw-r-- 1 muru muru 0 Dec 5 20:53 file $ ln -s file link $ ls -l total 0 -rw-rw-r-- 1 muru muru 0 Dec 5 20:53 file lrwxrwxrwx 1 muru muru 4 Dec 5 20:53 link -> ...


4

Traditional Unix permissions are limited to owner, group and other. But most modern unices support access control lists. On modern Linux systems, ACL support is enabled by default in the filesystem, but you may need to install the ACL utilities getfacl and setfacl (e.g. on Debian/Ubuntu/Mint you may need to install the acl package). chmod u=rwx,go= somefile ...


3

For a user someusername to be able to write in folder, that was initially made by root, you need to change the rwx permissions and/or the owner resp. group. If you restrict the permissions then someusername needs to be either owner or group member. If you do chmod 777 /somefolder, everyone can read and write, including someusername. If you do chmod 770 ...


3

You can't execute /bin/bash in your chroot and that is most likely because your filesystem is mount with the noexec option and maybe also with nosuid. You can check this running with the mount command as that will show the mount options and you may need to remount the filesystem with other options.


2

I think I found what caused the problem. When NFS client accesses an NFS share, the server checks UID and GID of the accessing user. And by default NFS server comes with root_squash option enabled, that assigns NFS client accessing the share as root the UID/GID of nfsnobody. After I had added the no_root_squash option to the export in /etc/exports file the ...


2

Chroot in ubuntu or recovering Ubuntu,Debian Linux boot from livecd of ubuntu, if you installed with system 32bit use 32bit Live CD, If 64bit use 64 bit live cd. Mount the Linux Partitions using # sudo blkid Output: sysadmin@localhost:~$ sudo blkid [sudo] password for sysadmin: /dev/sda1: UUID="846589d1-af7a-498f-91de-9da0b18eb54b" TYPE="ext4" ...


2

Read permissions on a directory only allow you to list its contents. To actually be able to access the contents, you need execute permissions. Conversely, having only execute permissions will allow you to access the contents, but not list them. See Why do directories need the executable (X) permission to be opened?


2

This is by far the most convenient, and is besides I believe, exactly what you asked for originally: http://ss64.com/osx/chmod.html It is fully interactive, though you cannot edit the string "-r-x-------" but you can the octal or the checkboxes. Doing either updates the other. From the same page: Numeric (absolute) mode: From one to four octal digits ...


2

There are several things mixed here mounting a filesystem by user and superuser, accessing files on a mounted file system and accessing the data on the "raw" device. mounting a file system root can always mount a file system, provided he can access the device that carries it - which it can when the kernel recognizes it. Users are only allowed to mount a ...


2

It depends on if blah is a root on your sda3 installation. If no: By default can only root mounting anything, so you don't need even get out them from the /etc/fstab. Only what you should check: They need the noauto flag (to not mount them on boot) And shouldn't have the user flag (or they were mountable by user). If he is a root, or have (or can make) ...


1

While Anthon's answer is technically correct, I'm writing this one to explain where Octal Permissions come from, and how to calculate them. Octal Permissions is one of the most important concepts in the *nix world. Why This Concept is Important Since the Birth of Unix Circa 1969 -1974 on a discarded DEC PDP-7 (see photo and history) and Linus Torvalds ...


1

The rws part denotes that, setuid permission for the file is set. It allows the users to run/execute the file with the privileges and permissions of it's owner. In order to enable setuid permission on the file mentioned in the question, you should run: chmod 4755 openmgr Or chmod u+s openmgr


1

You should get yourself familiar with man chmod (chmod(1) - change file mode bits). hint: chmod 4755.


1

I think it's here. /data/system/packages.list


1

Check out the stat command, this shows 3 times the last time the file was accessed, when it was last modified and when it's permissions were last changed. The one which you're interested in is permissions (change), see the below output for an example file I have just chmod'ed; prompt::11:26:45-> stat ideas.md File: ‘ideas.md’ Size: 594 ...


1

Simply give read and execute access to /var/www/ and read write and execute access to ucp cd /var/www/ chmod 777 ucp cd ../../ chmod 555 /var or even complicated by making execute access to /var/www but in this case you have to make sure that user will type a complete path to reach at ucp cd /var/www chmod 777 ucp cd ../../ chmod 111 /var Note:- ...


1

Directories have two ways of operation. The first is to read or browse a directory, also known as running the ls command, and the other is executing a directory. Executing is required to open a file or directory in the requested directory. Executing is doing an inode lookup for the requested name and you don't have to be able to read the directory for that. ...


1

You need to use Access Control Lists (ACL) to achieve finer control in file and directory permissions.


1

(this does not answer the chroot, but can allow you to change a forgotten unix passwd) I understood disk is mounted on /media/usb try cd /media/usb/etc vi shadow pick line with root, wipe second field (or you can pick the crypted string of a know password from your actual /etc/shadow). in case shadow don't exists, do the same in passwd


1

It turns out this was quite specific to the context described above. I was using uWSGI to serve my site using emperor mode. I set the parameters uid=www-data and gid=www-data. I expected this to cause my vassal processes to have the permissions associated with the user and the group www-data as well as the permissions associated with any group to which ...


1

It looks like the script is creating the 'receipts_download.log' file in the cwd and your cwd when running the script is not /test. Please cd /test before running the script and it will go okay.


1

The difference is most likely in environment variables and current working directory. service starts script from / and with clean environment. So, you may need to examine your environment and current working directory (with the help of export, pwd or set commands) and add missing prerequisites into your script.


1

Create user and group admin with non-interactive shell on NFS server, assuming that admin user and group exists in nfs client. The non-interactive shell option will prevent admin at NFS client from gaining access to NFS server. It works, because nfs maps uid and gid of server with its clients, so any file permissions assigned to the exported directories will ...


1

This is one of the ugly corner cases of the Unix permission model. Granting write access to a file permits hard-linking it. If user A has write permission to the directory containing the file, they can move it to a directory where user B has no access. User B then can't access the file anymore, but it still counts against user B for quota purposes. Some ...


1

Running ./foo.env means you're trying to execute the file as a shell script. Running a file as a shell script means that the file must have executable permission for your account. Running . ./foo.env is the equivalent of source ./foo.env, which means you only need to have read permission to the file.


1

Any particular reason why owner doesn't have full permissions? Owner's permissions take precedence. As a root, you can do anything, but as a regular user if you remove rwx for a directory you own, you cannot enter it since you don't have a search bit (x). It does not matter that you are in a group that have permissions. Right know, user jimmy cannot ...


1

I went in a different direction and solved my problem. Braiam's comment and Anthon's answer got me to thinking and researching Samba. That led me to discover that Linux has a service for AFP (Apple File Protocol) which is Apple file sharing. The Linux service is Netatalk. Not only does it respect my file name changes, it also allows me to use other ...


1

According to wikipedia (last paragraph): HFS saves the case of a file that is created or renamed but is case-insensitive in operation. In practise this often means you cannot rename a file while preserving the name. Running this via Samba (that probably expects a case-sensitive filesystem underneath, as those have been around for at least 30 years), ...


1

I just have had the same problem with my Win-Ubuntu shared folder, and the way I solved it was adding my user into the vboxsf group, editing the /etc/group file. Hope this works for you. Down here you can find a short scheme of how I edited the file (edit /etc/group) ... ... ... pulse:x:119: pulse-access:x:120: utempter:x:121: rtkit:x:122: saned:x:123: ...



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