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A couple of reasons for having less active CPU's than available are: IBM POWER servers have something called capacity in demand, which means that you can buy a server with more CPU's installed than want to use initially, and activate them later when needed. Like in your case the servers has 16 CPUs installed, but only 8 are active. Another reason for ...


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You can also try this: Use sar to report on context-switches and irq use over time. Sar is a great but unhearalded system monitoring tool. Run it for a day and then use various reports to look for oddness. Steps: Install the sysstat package. Set up the cron job (check /etc/cron.d/ to see if such a file exists) like this: * * * * * root ...


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Rsync copies files. That's what it does. Even if you tell it to remove source files, it still copies them first, it never moves them, even when the destination happens to be on the same filesystem. The mv utility from GNU coreutils has an option -u to move files only if the destination is older than the source or doesn't exist yet. This is similar to ...


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I don't know why you edited the free -h output command which lacks the -/+ buffers/cache line - which is important. Anyway we can proceed. As long as the 'Free' column (on the Mem: line) is >0, you're not really low on RAM as this is absolutely unused RAM. And Linux is well known to use all the RAM it can get (as caches, hoping for better perforamnce). The ...


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rsync copies files, it never moves them. Combinations of find and mv will likely do what you want.



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