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If you want to save the data for long term evaluation, you could use munin to graph it. I haven't seen plugins for GPUs, but since you figured out how to get the data, it isn't a big deal to write a munin plugin: http://munin-monitoring.org/wiki/HowToWritePlugins


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The read-only test only reads. That's basically the default testing method for just about everything and pretty much the same what disks do for SMART self-tests. The non-destructive read-write test works by overwriting data, then reading to verify, and then writing the original data back afterwards. The only way to verify that writing data works is by ...


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GNU find has an optimization which can be applied to find . but not to find . -type f: if it knows that none of the remaining entries in a directory are directories, then it doesn't bother to determine the file type (with the stat system call) unless one of the search criteria requires it. Calling stat can take measurable time since the information is ...


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For reference, it's usually better to at least run vmstat -wtI 5 3 (-w gives wide output, -t gives timestamps so it's easier later to correlate your numbers to other performance monitoring results you may have running in parallel, and -I gives additional columns for file pagein/pageout) as you ran it for 60 seconds, and only looking at the vmstat output for ...


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According to IBM documentation [1], the field r shows the number of runnable threads, precisely, the number of threads already running + number of threads waiting in a queue. So, if r < lcpu, it means all the threads are on CPU and you have no threads waiting in a queue. In your case, 11 threads are running, and you even have 1 spare lcpu. Let's say r = ...


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Assuming that you want to open and send the same file at each new connection, you can use -U, the reverse direction to -u, and the reversed addresses, as in the following socat -b1048576 -U TCP4-LISTEN:9899,reuseaddr,fork OPEN:somefile.dat socat TCP:127.0.0.1:9899 - >/dev/null If you want the file to repeat ad infinitum, you can use something like ...


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Another suggestion: You can also just buy a second hand brand name workstation (or build a custom one but I think it's not worth it) with 32/64gigs of ram and 2 x 8 core Xeon E5-2670s for instance (+hyperthreading, thus having 32 CPU threads), with 3 drives in RAID5 and install an OS as a hypervisor and have your 3 OS's in virtual machines. This way you can ...


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I of course can't give you the answer to your situation, but I wan't to try and give you some ideas on it. First of all: use SSDs! I understood that you can't affort them yet, but you will definitely love them once you have them. And I assume it is a better idea to do this whole setup once and for all, not now and in a few month you have to do it all over ...


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Ok, so i think i figured it out. Speaking about performance, BTRFS did the best job. I tried multiple linux based NAS, made all with the same hardware but with different filesystem. I used FIO (http://freecode.com/projects/fio) to run benchmarks as suggested by a Veeam Software white paper since I'm using their backup product ...


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Lookup tpacket_rcv: it's in af_packet.c. AF_PACKET means tcpdump. It looks like someone else saw a problem triggered by tcpdump, without resolution: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/mechanical-sympathy/qLqYTouygTE/rq9XSBxgqiMJ But I'm suspicious about drops in tpacket_rcv. Probably it means function exit via the label ring_is_full. It sounds like ...



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