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load average is a relative term; it's possible to have 0.01, 3.00, 14.00 - it's merely an indicator how much work is backed up, which is a function of how many cores you have available. On a 4 core system, 3.9 means nothing is backed up (but almost...). Looking at your output from top, I see that you're using 10.7% of your CPU just for top. I'm going to ...


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Please read this article http://www.linuxatemyram.com/ If you understand the risk then you can do free && sync && echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches && free


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ulimit(2) is obsolete now as it updates only a part of rlimit structure (most likely rendering it useless). There is a ulimit command in the bash shell, which is documented in bash's man page. The functions, getrlimit and setrlimit are to be used when linux apps are written as they supercede ulimit function.


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There will typically (lacking zero-copy trickery) be measurable overhead due to the extra IPC: copying the data from one process to another, rather than the "workhorse" process reading files directly. A pipe may also result in loss of performance for other reasons: with piped input a process cannot seek() on its input, and cannot mmap() it. Generally ...


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The pv command does not have much overhead on CPU in cases where I use it (mostly using zfs send and receive actions). If you just want to know that it is still processing you can just use pv to count data that is piped through it. If you want an estimate time of completion you might want to add a pre-command which counts the sum of data to be processed with ...


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I can only provide a guess, which is that the discrepancy is explained by varying computational, memory, caching or disk characteristics of the two hosts: If we assume that CPU is a bottleneck, then it would make some sense if the slower machine were slower at sending (this assumes that encrypting is more computationally heavy than decrypting). This can be ...


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No, not really. You can test the by debug tracing your operation. Assuming you're on linux, that's strace. mkdir test1 ln -s test1 test2 strace -o strace1.log ls -l test1 strace -o strace2.log ls -l test2 Then diff your two logs. You'll see they're basically the same sequence of operations. They call lstat which is a version of stat that follows ...


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The sar command gives you all sorts of useful system activity. For example, for general CPU usage: sar -u 2 10 shows (note - this is not a debian system, but it should be similar): 09:31:55 AM CPU %user %nice %system %iowait %steal %idle 09:31:57 AM all 1.71 0.00 1.14 0.00 0.00 97.14 09:31:59 AM ...


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Try to profile your application with iotop. sudo apt-get install iotop sudo iotop


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You CPU is slow. A score of 760 for a dual core CPU is bad. If you take a look at the single-core performance for that CPU on the site it's on par with a good Pentium III. The GPU should be good enough for YouTube but together with the CPU it could be not enough. I can watch 760p YouTube in HTML5 on a Pentium M with a much slower AMD GPU. Be sure to have ...



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