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2

Note that Linux gained a zRAM feature sometime in the past few years. It's a compressed ramdisk that can be used for swap space, i.e. to compress inactive memory content. The Gentoo Wiki entry on it claims it can achieve a compression ratio of around 3:1. It sounds worth considering for any desktop with less than ideal ram (4GB is ideal for most current ...


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tmux and xterm in Fullscreen mode with awesome-wm and vimperator browser add-on for vim-like keyboard shortcuts and many other extras. By the way, awesome-wm is very light-weight that comes with nine (9) "desktops" by default; an upgrade from your 4. To get the terminal in awesome-wm, just hit "Super/Windows-key/Mod4"+Enter. Switching desktops is done ...


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Let's do some tests. tar alone: time sh -c 'tar -czf test.tar.gz ~/Downloads' tar: Removing leading `/' from member names ===== JOB sh -c 'tar -czf test.tar.gz ~/Downloads' 74% cpu 30.02s real 20.64s user 1.82s sys tar pipe to gzip: time sh -c 'tar -c ~/Downloads | gzip -1 > test.tar.gz' tar: Removing leading `/' from member names ===== JOB sh -c ...


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For the desktop environment, I would advise a DWM-based tool like DWM, awesome, or i3. Get used to a terminal multiplexer like screen or tmux. For the text editor, obviously emacs or vim. For your web browser, try vimperator, or use a plugin for firefox/chromium (VimFX or Vimium for a vim-like experience). There may be others using emacs style.


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In the second option there are 2 applications that need to be started (tar and gzip). This takes extra time. Also the piping takes extra resources. This results in a longer execution time.


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In the former, the implementation of tar uses a gzip library to perform the compression itself. In the latter the output of tar gets piped into a separate executable that performs the compression. The former is probably slightly more efficient as it doesn't involve extra system calls to write/read the data to/from the pipe, but a human would likely not ...


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To disable the writing of access times, you need to mount the filesystem(s) in question with the noatime option. To mount an already mounted filesystem with the noatime option, do the following: mount /home -o remount,noatime To make the change permanent, update your /etc/fstab and add noatime to the options field. For example. Before: ...


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I found lazytime, a mount option for ext4, that solves this satisfactorily for me. https://lwn.net/Articles/620086/ This mode causes atime, mtime, and ctime updates to only be made to the in-memory version of the inode. The on-disk times will only get updated when (a) when the inode table block for the inode needs to be updated for some non-time ...


3

If performance is good - you're not having to wait while switching between apps, with the disk thrashing and the activity LED solid on - then there isn't going to be a lot of wear to worry about either. You could allocate a 2G space for swap at install time, and later tune the partition/swap size down e.g with GNOME Disks. Personally I would try 512M or 1G ...


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I wouldn't bother and go ahead with a 2GB swap partition.You must always have some swap especially with "only" 2GB RAM which is rather sufficient with Linux and a light DE like LXDE or Xfce as long as you do have 2GB swap (or if you don't use any browser, don't compile anything or do anything that eat a lot of RAM!).


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Oh my... I didn't mention this drive was moved from laptop where as the only drive it was 99% filled up with data. First LVM is mounted automatically at OS startup and has enabled TRIM (I know it's not recommended on encrypted devices as it reveals data organization on disk but OS partition contains only OS, not actual important data), second LVM was mounted ...


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Yes, and they sometimes are. Take a look at https://www.linux.com/community/blogs/133-general-linux/757898-using-preload-to-speed-up-linux preload. It's an example of doing what you want. It doesn't really load them to "execution" memory but to "file cache" memory, but that's "close enough". The other way to to compile and like a binary that uses the shared ...


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You asked how to create one, but just in case you want one: https://forums.hak5.org/index.php?/topic/29308-13gb-44gb-compressed-wpa-wpa2-word-list-982963904-words/ As for creating one, consider checking out a program called crunch (wordlist generator).



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