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If this is a UNIX (HP UX) machine and not Linux then you will need to add rcommand to your pam.conf under the sshd account. sshd account sufficient /usr/lib/security/libpam_ldap.1 rcommand Otherwise you will get a password prompt that won't take when trying to ssh into the machine.


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Another important consideration is password expiration. Just because SSH is set to enforce passwordless authentication does not mean that the login process will ignore passwords if told to check expiration. This is extremely important because there is not way to SSH into a server with a user account that has an expired password (from my own experience). ...


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Your Samba password is irrelevant at login time. Your login password is still working for logging in, but your session is interrupted soon afterwards. The problem is not related to your Samba password, it's something else you must have done around the same time. Try logging in text mode: press Ctrl+Alt+F1 to switch to a text console. If that works, run ...


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Assuming you're running something similar to RHEL/CentOS w/ OpenSSH, these are the things I typically do when going passwordless: Configure sshd_config to only accept pubkey authentication (PubkeyAuthentication yes, PasswordAuthentication no, ChallengeResponseAuthentication no, UsePAM no) Set all existing users to have a non-valid password (chpasswd -e ...


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You may use the expect program to supply a response when the password is asked. Note this also has the security problem of hard-coding passwords and is usually better to set a sudo rule for the passwordless execution of the command.


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It seems that you need to open a pty. You can try socat: echo pass | socat - exec:su.sh,pty,stderr,su=s3,ctty This way the password is not in the command line arguments, which would be a security issue. The better option would be to modify su.sh in the way that it does not need a password anymore.


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Yes it is possible, but there is an opportunity to change the password by running up a new password file in /etc/passwd. I hope this helps. If not, try the probably more effective by less stable option of messing around with sshd_config, but I wouldn't recommend it unless you now what you are doing.


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I have used Samba server long ago. After creating user and password for the user using the following command sudo smbpasswd -a user Before rebooting perform the following task. You have to add user to the smbuser file sudo vi /etc/samba/smbusers Add in the following line, substituting the username with the one you want to give access to. The format is ...


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Login from your tty. Press Ctrl+Alt+F1 or F2 to get tty login. Try to login from there and try to change the things mentioned by Ruban. If still login doesn't work, that means there might be some issue with your /etc/pam.d/login file. The solution is to boot your system in single user mode and change the file as required.


4

If you check the manpage with "man mkpasswd", you will see that that command also accepts an optional parameter -S, --salt=STRING If you omit it, it will use a random salt value, and therefore the encrypted password value will also be different. If you provide the salt, mkpasswd -m sha-512 password -s "11223344" ...


0

in addition to layout and definition , provided in other answers , let us talk about the usage , ways to edit and retrieve information of these fields . first as described by Erathiel , debian systems have the adduser command , that will ask five questions and set the corresponding fields upon user creation . i remember suse have no adduser , and gentoo ...


-1

Each line of the file describes a single user, and contains seven colon-separated fields: name:password:UID:GID:**GECOS**:directory:shell The field are as follows: GECOS This field (sometimes called the "comment field") is optional and used only for informational purposes. Usually, it contains the full username. Some programs (for example, ...


0

How about using agent forwarding? You can enable it in /etc/ssh/ssh_config (or ~/.ssh/config): Host * ForwardAgent yes or add "-A" every time you connect to your proxy: ssh -A user@remote_host By enabling this, you allow your proxy to forward your key to your target machines, so you can freely connect to other machines.


2

This is just a comment, so you should not worry about it. From info passwd: Each line of the file describes a single user, and contains seven colon-separated fields: name:password:UID:GID:**GECOS**:directory:shell The field are as follows: GECOS This field (sometimes called the "comment field") is optional and used only for ...


12

You've partly answered your own question, probably not realising you did :) The clue is hidden within the field list and the excerpt from /etc/passwd you've provided. See how the fields in the passwd file are separated by a :? The commas there are a part of the User ID Info field and include the following data: Full Name, Room Number, Work Phone, Home Phone, ...


10

The 5th field is sometimes known as the "GECOS" field (it stands for "General Electric Comprehensive Operating System"), and it is typically used to record additional information about the user - real name, building or room number, phone number, and any additional contact information (fax, pager number, etc). These subfields are comma delimited. In your ...


1

ssh by default and by design doesn't do it. This is because clear text passwords embedded in scripts is pretty fundamentally a bad idea. Not least because - if it's specified on a single command line, it normally shows up in the ps list that every user can see. So it's deliberately made difficult, to encourage better habits. public-private key pairs and ...


1

It is possible if you can install sshpass, so you can run: sshpass -p 'password' ssh 192.168.1.1


1

Root can sort of be logged in with an insecure password yes. With sudo su, is this a security issue? You have to decide that on your own (you can forbid sudo from using the su command to bypass that), similarly it depends on how you are using sudo, if you are giving your user account full access to any desired command through sudo, then of course, anyone who ...


0

Very useful for scripting is to use --password-file command line option. Create empty file called rsync_pass write in password to this file (nothing more) chmod 600 rsync_pass rsync $args --password-file=rsync_pass user@rsynchost::/share localdirectory This can be user for scripting and allows to be more secure that just exporting password to system ...


0

Although I didn't find the answer to the title, jordanm's response led me in the direction I needed. I was able to use nrpe to execute the script on the print server and therefore didn't need to enter a password.


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I had success with the update-passwd command after I manually edited the /etc/passwd file on Debian-based systems (e.g. Ubuntu). I know this is NOT the intended use of this command, but it works for this purpose, too. See its man page for more deatails: http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/precise/man8/update-passwd.8.html On Red Hat / CentOS based systems I ...


1

It sounds like you want real (non-root) user accounts with ssh keys and full NOPASSWD access via sudo (which is available by default in most Linux distros these days and is also trivial to install manually). You can have blank passwords for each user account (which won't work remotely), then the user either runs sudo -s or the user's ~/.bash_profile merely ...


2

The best way is with the following command: passwd --status username From man passwd: Display account status information. The status information consists of 7 fields. The first field is the user's login name. The second field indicates if the user account has a locked password (L), has no password (NP), or has a usable password (P). The third ...


0

You may want to see the /etc/passwd file. The second field on your user indicates the password. If nothing is there you may have no password for your login. On the other hand, if you have an x on this field you have a password associated to it and it may be at the /etc/shadow file


2

You can test this in 2 easy ways. Right after you change the password, as root type login, that will bring you to a login/password prompt. Depending on your system odds are you are using shadow passwords. The file for that is in /etc/shawdow you can look in that file to see if your account has any changes to it. Here is an example with an account ...


0

Put your keys in the environment as environment variables. The way sites like Amazon aws and heroku recommend that you store sensitive information like keys and passwords are in environment variables. Put the password in a text file that is readable only by you Assuming this is a Mac or linux system: touch foo.sh Place the export in the file nano ...


1

I can give you an answer, but using another tool: pwgen user@host:~$ pwgen -s -c -1 -N 400000 15 Extracted from pwgen manuals: -s, --secure Generate completely random, hard-to-memorize passwords. These should only be used for machine passwords, since otherwise it's almost guaranteed that users will simply write the password on a piece of ...



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