Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I had the same issue with a much more recent Fedora version (F20), and gnome-keyring version was not the culprit. Here is how I solved it : Right click on nm-applet. Click on "edit connections". Select the connection you're having issues with, then "edit". Go to the "Wi-Fi Security" tab and enter the wifi password. Save and exit.


1

In Keepass2, "Add Entry," and set "Title" to "GPG." Move from "Entry" tab to "Auto-Type" tab. Select "Override default sequence" and set to "{PASSWORD}". Before you send email, open Keepass2 with Keepass2 password. Ask IceDove with Enigmail to "Send" and pinentry should appear (locking keyboard, preventing "Ctrl+V" (or any other keyboard shortcut you ...


0

Sorry to hear that. If the laptop has CD-Rom, you can try burn live CD of ubuntu, and mount the file system read, write; if no CD-Rom, you can try live USB from http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-ubuntu. Then follow instructions https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LiveCdRecovery. Although it's ubuntu, it should work for minty as ...


0

Sorry I misunderstood your question at first. If you just need to alter a user to have no password, you can just run sudo passwd -d <name of user> Alternatively, if you only plan on logging in to the password-less user using su, just run it like this: `sudo su <user>` You will have to enter your password for sudo, as per usual, unless you ...


4

Simply change permissions of the files in a way everyone could read them, but not alter them. When you use ls -l to list your files, you get something like ls -l file -rw-rwxr-- 1 rafael Grp 1620 Aug 18 14:58 file That first set of dashes/letters sets the permitting of three distinct (but not exclude each other) groups, namely User ...


4

The usual way to change the password is to use the passwd(1) command. If you want to use chpasswd(8) or usermod(8) you shoould carefully RTFM. Be sure that the given password is compatible with the system configuration. And sudo should apply to the chpasswd command, so you probably want echo 'user:passwd' | sudo chpasswd In your case sudo echo ...


3

Go to http://www.openwall.com/john/ and find the URL of the latest community-enhanced version, which is in xz format. wget http://www.openwall.com/john/j/john-1.8.0-jumbo-1.tar.xz tar xf john-1.8.0-jumbo-1.tar.xz sudo apt-get install libssl-dev cd john-1.8.0-jumbo-1/src && ./configure && make cd ../run sudo ./unshadow /etc/passwd /etc/shadow ...


2

SSH keys First of all, the best solution for you would be to create new ssh keypair and use this key to login to all your servers (or some, based on preferences). If you don't know how, you can find it many times here on stackexchange, but shortcut: ssh-keygen; ssh-copy-id your-host Basically you should set passphrase for your key, so you will log in ...


3

you might screw up permissions in your config file you might check your config file into source control you might be working on an open source project so cannot put passwords in source control Answer: use an env var


0

The point is that, unlike MS-Windows, most Unix systems are installed with remote access capabilities (for example, an SSH server is run by default by practically every GNU/Linux distribution). In other words, by creating an account with an empty password you invite the whole world to log on to your machine. This is particularly bad with the root account, ...


0

This is really just a supplementary answer to the others. I'd add it as a comment if I was allowed. It's also not a very good practice because it puts the password in plaintext which you should never do if you can avoid it. A mysql config file is at least more easily protected than a script. The answer that I'm avoiding is: Expect scripting. Using Expect ...


0

Stephane's answer is the best way how to do it for mysql case. And in most cases using the program's "own" way is the best. However, to answer the Bash part of your question: mysqldump -u joe -p <<<"joe's pasword" > /path/to/backup/file or (less insecure) mysqldump -u joe -p </path/to/file/with/joes/password > /path/to/backup/file ...


0

I was looking for something like this (bash): hash=$(sudo cat /etc/shadow |grep "^$USER:" |cut -d: -f2) cmphash=$(mkpasswd -m sha-512 -S "$(echo "$hash" | cut -d '$' -f3)") cmp <(echo "$hash") <(echo "$cmphash") && echo "Correct password!" This works but harcodes the hash method which somehow identified by the number in echo "$hash" | cut ...


3

Most modern Unix systems use PAM to handle authentication. The pam_unix module is the one that does password authentication against /etc/password and /etc/shadow. However, you shouldn't reinvent the wheel. Asking for the user's password and running as root is a basic configuration of sudo, the de facto standard way to elevate privileges. Note that properly ...


4

Setting a password with passwd or chpasswd generates a random salt, so users who happen to have the same password would not have identical hashes. In order to have identical hashes this way, you'd have to have a misconfigured system that somehow doesn't save entropy between reboots, and systems that are so completely identical as to repeat the random seed ...


2

Leaving a plain text password in any file is always a bad idea in case your system is ever compromised. Sometimes it is unavoidable. To make this "secure" you should limit this activity to a very limited user and also leave these sensitive options in a defaults file. To solve your issue specifically, from the mysql man page: If you use the short option ...


0

If the options are the same as I remember them you should be able to do the following: mysqldump -opt [db_name] -u [username] -p[password] > [path to backup file] Don't put a space between the -p and the actual password.


11

The best kind of approach here is to do something like: mysqldump --defaults-extra-file=/path/to/auth.cnf ... Where auth.cnf looks like: [client] user=the-user password=the-password Then make sure the file is only readable by whomever is meant to run that script. The script itself can be world readable.


4

Your root password is qwer134. % /usr/sbin/john --show pwdfile root:qwer134:0:0:Super-User,,,,,,,:/:/bin/ksh lp:passwd1:9:9:Print Spooler Owner:/var/spool/lp:/bin/sh nuucp:NO PASSWORD:10:10:Remote UUCP User:/var/spool/uucppublic:/usr/lib/uucp/uucico 3 password hashes cracked, 0 left It took john 2.5 days to find the root password and could easily have ...


6

This password is hashed with the traditional DES-based method. This method is not so broken that it allows directly finding the password from the hash. It requires brute force, i.e. calculating password hashes until you find the right one. This hash method is broken in that the hash calculation is relatively fast, and the password is limited to 8 characters ...


3

About your actual question, see taliezin's answer (and accept that one ;) About your other problem: Search for the string 8sh9JBUR0VYeQ on the disk to figure out the disk block(s) it resides in. Then dd that disk block(s) into a file, replace that string with a known password hash (the old crypt() one - same length) and write the disk block(s) back to the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included