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1

This password is hashed with the traditional DES-based method. This method is not so broken that it allows directly finding the password from the hash. It requires brute force, i.e. calculating password hashes until you find the right one. This hash method is broken in that the hash calculation is relatively fast, and the password is limited to 8 characters ...


1

About your actual question, see taliezin's answer (and accept that one ;) About your other problem: Search for the string 8sh9JBUR0VYeQ on the disk to figure out the disk block(s) it resides in. Then dd that disk block(s) into a file, replace that string with a known password hash (the old crypt() one - same length) and write the disk block(s) back to the ...


2

There is no dedicated command to check when your password will expire. You can check the password expiration policy for any user via lsuser as root with lsuser -a maxage username or with pwdadm -q username if any other flags are set for that user. If you would like to know when your password expires, have a look at this question which is the same as yours: ...


0

You do not need to use the /etc/passwd file. If user directories are in /home, and if you have root privilege, you can use find as find /home -name cat.sh -exec ls -l {} \; If you want to see the time of last use, you can specify the option as -lu.


10

The accounts with passwords are the accounts with a glob of base64 gibberish in the second field: root:8sh9JBUR0VYeQ:0:0:Super-User,,,,,,,:/:/bin/ksh lp:VvHUV8idZH1uM:9:9:Print Spooler Owner:/var/spool/lp:/bin/sh This computer appears to be using the traditional, DES-based crypt(3) password hash. This hash is quite weak by modern standards; if you can't ...


18

You have to check man passwd: If the encrypted password is set to an asterisk (*), the user will be unable to login using login(1), but may still login using rlogin(1), run existing processes and initiate new ones through rsh(1), cron(8), at(1), or mail filters, etc. Trying to lock an account by simply changing the ...


7

This means that it is disabled for direct login. It is a user that is used for running services or to be used for rlogin. Check https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passwd#Password_file


1

Use chage -l pooja, where pooja is your login name. This command is available also to the nonprivileged user. If you're root, you can also use passwd -S pooja.


1

Open KWalletManager (/usr/bin/kwalletmanager) in KDE, go to Contents / Form Data / Maps, select the correct id, check Show Values box. Works for me. If you can't find it this way: save your login page to a HTML file, place it on a localhost webserver with PHP/CGI support, trick your resolver via /etc/hosts to call local page instead of the original, write a ...


0

This is much easier than suggested by other answers. No need to format, reboot or use live CD. su root # then enter your password to switch to root user chown root:root /usr/bin/sudo && chmod 4755 /usr/bin/sudo exit # to get back to the original user This is the easiest way to fix this issue. Explanation, sudo is corrupted (I know corrupted is the ...


1

You can also use password less connections, just use public/private key and you are ready to go. Using lftp client you can establish connections giving username/password as a parameter in the command line lftp sftp://sftp_server -uuser,password


4

sudo su asks for the user's password, the user has to be in the sudo/adm/admin/wheel group (depening on flavour of the OS) to be able to execute sudo. The root password will be prompted when using su alone. Check the settings in /etc/sudoers file to see why you are not being asked for a password while using sudo. Most likely the time-out is set to a few ...


0

/etc/group lists all the groups, when you issue the command: groups It shows you all the groups you belong to, Which is gotten from /etc/group /etc/passwd shows all the information for a user, stuff like username, userid, default groupid, home directory, and your default shell. The user is added to this file once you create then via adduser. Another ...


1

The list of groups a user belongs to is stored in /etc/group When you add a user to group /etc/group is updated. The /etc/passwd file doesn't tell you which users belong to which groups. It only has the group id of the user's default group. The groups command returns info from /etc/group


2

I don't think it's a bad idea to harden your system by protecting accounts as good as possible as you can. In many situations it will introduce extra hurdles during authentication, but if you're willing to cope with that it's all fine. An important thing to take into account, though, is the risk of actually introducing more flaws by increasing the complexity ...


5

I'm not sure why you would want to do that. If you're concerned about security, if someone discovers your password on 1 July, they'll know it on 31 July or 15 September... To answer your question, if you want to ensure that the password update is done either at a scheduled time or when the system restarts, you want to install anacron. It can do periodic ...


7

There is a timestamp_timeout option in your /etc/sudoers... Example: to get password remembered for 5 hours Defaults timestamp_timeout=300


19

There is timestamp_timeout option in your /etc/sudoers. You can set up this option to number of minutes. After that time it will ask for password again. More info in man sudoers. And make sure you edit your sudoers file using visudo, which checks your syntax and which will not leave you with wrong configuration and inaccessible sudo.


1

A quick search turned up Two Factor SSH Setup which is a simple walkthrough of the steps required for setup.


3

Reading between the lines, what you want to configure is two-factor authentication. This will require an additional "piece of information" in addition to the password for the user to log in. There are a multitude of ways of implementing it, but a few popular options are: The open source Google Authenticator. Using a third party product like YubiKey - see ...


2

I read with Wayland there comes the infrastructure to prohibit it, but now it's still a problem. Just see xinput test-xi2 The first article I read about the problem: http://theinvisiblethings.blogspot.de/2011/04/linux-security-circus-on-gui-isolation.html Further and deeper discussion: http://lwn.net/Articles/517375/


3

You asked how to create one, but just in case you want one: https://forums.hak5.org/index.php?/topic/29308-13gb-44gb-compressed-wpa-wpa2-word-list-982963904-words/ As for creating one, consider checking out a program called crunch (wordlist generator).


4

Don't use password authentication. Use ssh keypairs. Karthik@A $: ssh-keygen #keep the passphrase empty Karthik@A $: ssh-copy-id B #enter your B password #^ this will copy your public key to Karthik@B:.ssh/authorized_keys From then on, you should be able to ssh from A to B (and by extension, scp from A to B) without a password.


0

Generate an ssh-key on server A using ssh-keygen. This will generate a private and public key pair in $HOME/.ssh. Add the public key to the $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys file on server B. You can use the man command to get more information. The command man authorized_keys will present the manual page that discusses authorized keys. Try the following sites ...


0

File Roller (the GNOME application whose variant/fork/whatever-you-call-it you use) depends on zip. That should not be the case - according to the fileroller news page, p7zip is used to create zip archives since version 2.23.4 - see this somewhat outdated fileroller news page. It's also stated on 7-Zip's Wiki page: 7-Zip supports: The 256-bit ...


4

Running this command without SSH keys should prompt you for a password. I am using something similar and don't have any problems. Most probably you are having problems connecting to the ssh server. Make sure You have access to the server. You can run traceroute your.server.ip.address to see if you can connect to it. Make sure you have the ssh server up ...



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