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I have think that you can use scp command You should create a ssh key. How to generate a key Now, you can copy the files in other server. scp file user@server.com:/path/ I hope that it work


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By design ssh doesn't allow 'embedding' of passwords - that's because it has a mechanism for non-interactive auth using public-private key pairs. So I would suggest you consider that as your first port of call. Usually it's as simple as: run ssh-keygen on your client. add the id_rsa.pub to ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on your server. If that's not an ...


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Boot from the installation media and then mount the disk and edit /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow if needed. If you don't have the media, try to connect the disk to another system which can mount an old sysv-ufs in rw mode.


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On Ubuntu 12.04, there is mkpasswd (from the whois package): Overfeatured front end to crypt(3) mkpasswd -m sha-512 -s <<< YourPass Where: -m = Compute the password using the TYPE method. If TYPE is help then the available methods are printed. E.g. mkpasswd -m help -s = Read password from stdin


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From man screen: password [crypted_pw] Present a crypted password in your ".screenrc" file and screen will ask for it, whenever someone attempts to resume a detached. This is useful if you have privileged programs running under screen and you want to protect your session from reattach attempts by another user masquerading as your uid ...


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According to the manual: man passwd: -S, --status Display account status information. The status information consists of 7 fields. The first field is the user's login name. The second field indicates if the user account has a locked password (L), has no password (NP), or has a usable password (P). The third field gives the ...


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From the passwd(1) manpage: -S, --status Display account status information. The status information consists of 7 fields. The first field is the user's login name. The second field indicates if the user account has a locked password (L), has no password (NP), or has a usable password (P). The third ...


-1

Another alternative is to use the yes command in your script. yes newpassword | passwd youruser This will send newpassword to the passwd command for youruser. It should be mentioned that setting/modifying user passwords via scripts may present security risks and should be avoided whenever possible. EDIT: This answer requires root access. Apologies for ...


4

You're looking for the chpasswd command. You'd do something like this: echo 'pi:newpassword' | chpasswd # change user pi password to newpassword Note that it needs to be run as root, at least with the default PAM configuration. But presumably run as root isn't a problem for a system deployment script. Also, you can do multiple users at once by feeding it ...


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Checking this link would be helpful : http://tweaktheserver.com/ssh-cant-connect-authentications-that-can-continue-publickeygssapi-keyexgssapi-with-micpassword/


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Basic and digest authentication basically works by requiring a valid username/password to access a page, giving the browser a 401 unauthorized the first time the it tries to get the page. When your browser realizes it needs a password to get in it prompts the user for what password to give the web server. So there's no real opportunity to do what you're ...


2

Leaving server_prompts as-is gives you the default (RFC compliant) behaviour, otherwise you might need to modify your clients to supply additional values. The password is looked up in the CONFDIR/passwd file, CONFDIR is equal to /etc/exim4 on Debian. Is your intention that all users use a common password? Then you could change the server_condition. ...


2

Linux use pam to handle authentication tasks. Setting default password hashing algorithm was done by editing /etc/pam.d/common-password: password [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so obscure sha256 Change to whatever algorithm you wan to use: password [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so obscure sha512 Now, your default password hashing ...


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Setup ENCRYPT_METHOD SHA512 in file /etc/login.defs Also pay attention to NOTE mentioned in the same file, just above the ENCRYPT_METHOD parameter, which says Note: It is recommended to use a value consistent with the PAM modules configuration. So additional modification along with /etc/login.defs is to modify /etc/pam.d/common-password ...


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It's possible that somebody was trying to spoof that server. It's also possible, and in most environments more likely, that there was a misconfiguration of some kind. Maybe the DNS is misconfigured and has several IP addresses recorded for the same host name. Maybe two machines were competing for the same IP address. Maybe the SSH server on the target ...


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The first time you logged into the server, it didn't have a key value associated with it's hostname in your ~/.ssh/known_hosts. When you accepted its identity, you added the key. Subsequent log ins referenced that key value so its identity was verified and you got no message. When you logged in from a different system, one that had accessed this server ...



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