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12

You've partly answered your own question, probably not realising you did :) The clue is hidden within the field list and the excerpt from /etc/passwd you've provided. See how the fields in the passwd file are separated by a :? The commas there are a part of the User ID Info field and include the following data: Full Name, Room Number, Work Phone, Home Phone, ...


10

The 5th field is sometimes known as the "GECOS" field (it stands for "General Electric Comprehensive Operating System"), and it is typically used to record additional information about the user - real name, building or room number, phone number, and any additional contact information (fax, pager number, etc). These subfields are comma delimited. In your ...


4

If you check the manpage with "man mkpasswd", you will see that that command also accepts an optional parameter -S, --salt=STRING If you omit it, it will use a random salt value, and therefore the encrypted password value will also be different. If you provide the salt, mkpasswd -m sha-512 password -s "11223344" ...


2

This is just a comment, so you should not worry about it. From info passwd: Each line of the file describes a single user, and contains seven colon-separated fields: name:password:UID:GID:**GECOS**:directory:shell The field are as follows: GECOS This field (sometimes called the "comment field") is optional and used only for ...


2

The best way is with the following command: passwd --status username From man passwd: Display account status information. The status information consists of 7 fields. The first field is the user's login name. The second field indicates if the user account has a locked password (L), has no password (NP), or has a usable password (P). The third ...


2

You can test this in 2 easy ways. Right after you change the password, as root type login, that will bring you to a login/password prompt. Depending on your system odds are you are using shadow passwords. The file for that is in /etc/shawdow you can look in that file to see if your account has any changes to it. Here is an example with an account ...


1

ssh by default and by design doesn't do it. This is because clear text passwords embedded in scripts is pretty fundamentally a bad idea. Not least because - if it's specified on a single command line, it normally shows up in the ps list that every user can see. So it's deliberately made difficult, to encourage better habits. public-private key pairs and ...


1

It is possible if you can install sshpass, so you can run: sshpass -p 'password' ssh 192.168.1.1


1

Root can sort of be logged in with an insecure password yes. With sudo su, is this a security issue? You have to decide that on your own (you can forbid sudo from using the su command to bypass that), similarly it depends on how you are using sudo, if you are giving your user account full access to any desired command through sudo, then of course, anyone who ...


1

It sounds like you want real (non-root) user accounts with ssh keys and full NOPASSWD access via sudo (which is available by default in most Linux distros these days and is also trivial to install manually). You can have blank passwords for each user account (which won't work remotely), then the user either runs sudo -s or the user's ~/.bash_profile merely ...


1

I can give you an answer, but using another tool: pwgen user@host:~$ pwgen -s -c -1 -N 400000 15 Extracted from pwgen manuals: -s, --secure Generate completely random, hard-to-memorize passwords. These should only be used for machine passwords, since otherwise it's almost guaranteed that users will simply write the password on a piece of ...


1

I'll just point out what the manpage of zip says about encryption (see description of --password): .... (And where security is truly important, use strong encryption such as Pretty Good Privacy instead of the relatively weak standard encryption provided by zipfile utilities.) File Roller (the GNOME application whose variant/fork/whatever-you-call-it ...



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