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95

The concern is whether your password is recorded in the authentication log. If you're logging in on a text console under Linux, and you pressed Ctrl+C at the password prompt, then no log entry is generated. At least, this is true for Ubuntu 14.04 or Debian jessie with SysVinit, and probably for other Linux distributions; I haven't checked whether this is ...


3

In your case, you are safe - you've typed in a password and cancelled out of it. A password typed into login prompt followed by wrong password will be considered failed authentication and is partially recorded to btmp log. For tty console that's however alright. $ sudo lastb [sudo] password ...


3

This isn't something you can really control without extremely intrusive testing. You could conceivably attempt to log in as a user with every string you find in their home directory (and sanction the user if you're ever successful), but that's far from reasonable or feasible. You could, though, if this is for secure shell connections, disable password ...


2

Ran into the same problem. Turns out the problem is solved by adding the disable_interactive option next to pam_mount.so in the config files ( /etc/pam.d/common-{auth,session}). It comes right after pam_mount.so and the options are separated with spaces (from the so file name and between each two options). When the pam_mount.so code gets executed upon a ...


2

What you really want to do is look at setting up public keys between the servers so they 'trust' each other and passwords are not needed. Have a read here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2011/07/rsync-over-ssh-without-password/


2

You can generate the NtPasswordHash (aka NTLM password hash) yourself as follows: echo -n plaintext_password_here | iconv -t utf16le | openssl md4 Prefix it with "hash:" in the wpa_supplicant.conf file, i.e. password=hash:6602f435f01b9173889a8d3b9bdcfd0b


1

Giving visual feedback for every character entered would by definition reveal the number of characters typed, so by that metric, no, there is not a way to simultaneously do a thing and not do it.


1

The best you can do is hash the password. Set wpa-psk to the output of: wpa_passphrase <SSID> <KEY> This will obfuscate the password, but it will not prevent someone else from using the hash to connect with another device. As an additional measure you should also set /etc/network/interfaces file permission to rw------- (600), chmod og-rw.


1

you should let the user generate the key pair, and send you the public key so that you can add it to the list of authorized keys for passwordless authentication. the user's private key is, well, private :-)



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