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Does your hard disk have an EFI partition? I've seen this error, even when setting the bios to legacy mode, if there is no EFI partition. A simple way of checking is to download a recent ubuntu, install it and inspect the partition table. You should then be able to install pardus over the top of ubuntu, but don't allow it to delete the EFI partition ...


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You are not booted in EFI-mode. Can you disable Secure Boot -- it could be falling back to "Legacy" mode in the absence of a correctly signed kernel image and bootloader. And if you have already disabled Secure Boot, this means that you motherboard do not allow UEFI. The reason why this step is vital is that Legacy boot use MBR and UEFI mostly use ESP. So, ...


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after installing Debian boot into debian and just do as root update-grub2 all will be redetected and inserted to grub.conf if u not damaged ur windows partition ... remember for the next time install grub only in mbr but u can fix ur windows with booting win 10 from dvd/usb after fixing u need to reinstall grub


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First i would recommend booting off of the grub rescue disk. If it finds the windows install and allows you to boot into windows, then you are okay. Now you just need to add the location and menu entry to the grub config file. Booting from a grub rescue disk. super_grub_disk_hybrid-1.98s1.iso download page direct mirror link I find that using the older ...


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LVM is pretty flexible, but moving the beginning of a physical volume is one thing that it can't do, as far as I know. However, you don't need to move the beginning of a PV to add more space, only to reduce it. To add more storage space, just use the free space as a PV and add it to the volume group. Give a name to the free space: make a partition. You can ...


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LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is a subsystem. At the lowest level is a PV (Physical Volume). Within the PV is a VG (Volume Group) and within the VG are the LVs (Logical Volumes). You seem to be asking how to move or resize the PV corresponding to /dev/sda4. In order to do this you first need to deactivate the VG. (gparted > deactivate partition.) Note that ...


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If you have LVM on it, the easy way out is to make a new partition of the free space, set it up as physical volume in LVM and add that physical volume to your volume group. You're probably right that gparted won't touch the partition as it is in use.


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Ultimately the fix I found was similar to the one @Anthon posted. I ended up making a directory (VAR) in /home. I copied the contents of /var into that, then changed /etc/fstab such that /dev/md2 was being mounted at /var. Then I rebooted the system. When it came back I created a new /home directory (now ending up on /dev/md1), moved each of the user ...


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The simple solution, as derobert suggested in a comment, is to leave (most of) the existing files where they are, only move the one directory that's going to receive big files, and create a symbolic link to make the expected path point to where the files will actually be stored. For example, if you're converting this server to hold a lot of mail, you might ...


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The specification in ยง5, starting on PDF page 165, gives the layout of an MBR partition table. It does not mention the extended partition, so UEFI does not support it. Thus, according to the standard, would appear to be "no". (I confess to not having read all 2700 pages).


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As your md2 is not empty, the easiest way is to rsync the data from /var to the new partition and then make a soft link: rsync -xav /var /home/VAR mv /var /var.org ln -s /home/VAR /var This would be best done when booted from a live distro (with mounted md1 and md2 and adapted paths), if that is not possible, you might want to rsync another time in ...


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It depends where your grub2 repository is installed. And if your installation is fine, it will be on your boot partition (dev/sda1 for you). If it's not here, well I'll delete my post because you will have too learn how manage grub2 but i don't think that you want to. You can try rEFInd if you want something more easy to config. So when you'll erase Ubuntu, ...


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The root filesystem is passed to the kernel upon boot using the root argument. So you should be able to: cat /proc/cmdline and then look for root=/some/path, or perhaps root=UUID=longstring. For instance, I get: BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/kernel-genkernel-x86_64-4.4.0-sabayon root=UUID=18f3b5a1-3994-43ef-ad6d-cb4c86ff5f95 ro quiet splash If it's a path, it ...


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UUIDs solved my problem, which was the same as your problem. The following excerpt from the Arch Wiki is very helpful: If your machine has more than one SATA, SCSI or IDE disk controller, the order in which their corresponding device nodes are added is arbitrary. This may result in device names like /dev/sda and /dev/sdb switching around on each boot, ...


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Right now you cannot extend your /dev/sda8 partition because you have free (unallocated) space niether before nor after it. So, firstly you need to either shrink /dev/sda9 releasing some space at beginning of /dev/sda9 or shrink /dev/sda7 releasing some space at end of /dev/sda7 and merge it with unallocated partition between /dev/sda7 and /dev/sda8 Then you ...


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Linux pretty much ignores partition types, it cares more about the content on those partitions. So you don't need a swap partition type to use swap in Linux, and thus there is no issue with LVM not having partition types either. But you have to use the correct partition type to stop Windows from attempting to format your Linux data/swap partitions... it's ...


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A workaround is to calculate the offset of the BSD partition within the logical partition and use a loop device with offset: mount -t ufs -o loop,offset=8192,ro,ufstype=ufs2 /dev/sda6 /mnt


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Probably you have been confused by different harddisk naming convention in Linux and FreeBSD. From your output one can clearly see that Linux has detected your ufs partition and it is /dev/sda6. So, you just need to do the following sudo modprobe ufs sudo mount -t ufs -o ufstype=ufs2 /dev/sda6 /mnt


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Sorry that I don't know much about openSUSE, but under Debian there is a package called util-linux. There you'll find a tool called "lsblk", which will list all your installed block-devices, except RAM-Disks. Just type: lsblk I hope this will help.


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Grub is installed by linux, kubuntu in your case. Thus, if you remove ubuntu you'll lose your bootloader. Then you'd need to use a recovery cd to get your win10 back. I guess you should first fix your bootmanager, i.e. stop calling grub2 at boot time, from windows ; then only remove your kubuntu partition.


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fdisk reports "bogus" physical sector sizes. A kind of "historical compatibility". The system or the disk hardware is able to emulate 512-byte sectors if the alignment of your partitions requires this, but it is slower (and probably wears off SSDs faster). That's why it is widely recommended to align partitions on larger boundaries, as are yours (they are ...


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Just install exfat-fuse and exfat-utils. Then "mount /dev/<device> <mount point>. Done.


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Doing what you're asking is not easy, but I have two solutions that I hope might help you out. You have two disks. The first disk has /boot and / as primary partitions, and the third primary partition sda3 takes up all the remaining space and is let over to LVM. You have a second disk that is also let over to LVM in the same VG. Your problem is that to ...


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Debian installer will show 5 GB as power of 1000 (SI prefix base-10), which means user can immediately know 5 GB is 5*1000*1000*1000 bytes. Before installation Just yesterday, I had Debian 8.2 Xfce desktop release installed on my old test machine. The machine has a 60 GB hard disk, which I had setup manually to create 2.0 GB swap and 10.0 GB ext4 primary ...


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I'm assuming your goals are to: make as much space available for the users as possible not run out of disk space anywhere else and have to take the server down to resize them at a critical time If that's true, I'd recommend swapping the drives in sda and sdb and using the now-500GB sdb purely for /home. Then you can divide up the 300GB sda however you ...


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This is not a definitive answer, but looking at the latest sources for partman, which seems to be one of the underlying tools that you are going to be running, it seems only powers of 1000 suffixes are used and understood, so "1GB" means 1000,000,000 bytes. You can browse the sources here, in particular the file base.sh which has the function longint2human ...



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