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The disk label type is the type of Master Boot Record. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record. The disk identifier is a randomly generated number stuck onto the MBR. In terms of tools for looking at disks, fdisk is on it way to being deprecated if it isn't already so. parted is the replacement for fdisk and gparted can be used to provide a ...


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The post is a bit old, but I ran through exactly the same problem (Debian as well) and running the following command as root solved it: apt-get clean it released 2G of rootfs in my case (god knows why). I got this hint from the following link, which seems very comprehensive: https://wiki.maemo.org/Free_up_rootfs_space


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I have an alternate solutions for this situation. Lets say you have 1000 inodes in a partition of 10G. But due to inodes limit you are not suppose to use all space of partition. But in this solutions you will be able to use the remaining space of the partition without formatting it. $ df -i # see list ( I need just one free inode here so move just one file ...


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Then.. Goto Bash.. Search "Disks" and Open it.. . Select Memory card.. You'll be able to see that 32MB is used and rest is Free Memory.. . Clear the used memory( i.e. 32MB) . You'll be with all free space in Memory card.. . Now Format it.. With all 0's..


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It simply need all partitions to be removed. Create New Primary Partition and Format it with All O's.


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You probably made a disaster when you want to change something on lvm you must first do a full backup of volume with bacula,dd,tar,cpio,amanda,whatever you want. Then recreate the VG and lvm on new server and restore from backup for example OLD SERVER VG VG01 1 lvm / #simple case.. NEW SERVER VG VG02 1 lvm / #simple case.. recreate the VG02 on new server ...


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rsync -avz /dev/sda1 user@ip:/backup/ would attempt to copy the device node, not the disk content. You can make an image of the partition as a remote file: ssh -C user@ip:/backup/sda1.img </dev/sda1 This makes an image of the partition. It won't give you access to your files. In order to access your files, you need to mount the partition or the image: ...


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You still need to format the logical volume with some kind of filesystem. LVM just gets you to the point where you have one resizable volume instead of two fixed size volumes. Example: # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vol_grp1/logical_vol1 After that, try your mount command again.


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Compressibility of a disk image depends a lot on what kind of data is stored in there, how much of it is used or has ever been used (without being explicitely erased during the whole life of that drive). In short, it's impossible to tell. 77% is completely plausible as are 0% (a disk full of videos/oggs) and 99% (an empty, recently erased with zeros disk). ...


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You can do dd if=/dev/sda of=back.sda bs=10M You can increase or reduce the bs(block size) based on your i/o capacity(fast increase,slow decrease),then copy the back.sda with scp or rsync on backup. Later you can mount the image and recovery the files,this will work if sda is not broken disk,if is corrupted you can try a fsck. Rsync works for files,i ...


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The entries in /dev/mapper are LVM logical volumes. You can think of these as Linux's native partition type. Linux can also use other partition types, such as PC (MBR or GPT) partitions. Your disk is divided in MBR partitions, one of which (/dev/sda2) is an LVM physical volume. The LVM physical volume is the single constituent of the volume group ...


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If you're booting with windows 8 make some unallocated space for SUSE when booting SUSE it will automatically choose the swap partition and primary partition (only in SUSE 12.0 + )


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I don't see in your post that you have tried creating a new partition in the available space - via Fedora's installer. You may want to try that.


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I'll put an answer here since I've figured it out. First I query the disk layout using command similar to above but request sectors a units: > parted /dev/sda unit s print free Model: ATA Hitachi HUA72302 (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 3907029168s Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Disk Flags: Number Start End Size ...


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This is due to the limitations of the MBR. If you had a GPT (GUID Partition Table) you wouldn't have any problem. it is possible to use logical partitions instead of primary partitions for the swap, /boot, /, and /home partitions You will not have any problem. You have to create an extended partition (which is a primary special partition/placeholder) and ...


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If you partition the drive /dev/sda you will get as result two partitions, not drives /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 To partition it now you will need a lot of details. Will be better to back your data and start with new installation. And in the process of install select manual disk partitioning and split the disk


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You can easily partition it into /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 with fdisk, parted, gparted, or another partitioning tool (if you're working from a live CD) or via Anaconda (if you're in the Anaconda installer).


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you are quite lucky, because the second partition is a logical volume manager lvm partition for which it is easier to reduce, extend, add and delete logical partitions as described here. Basically you have to follow the steps described in the answer here, which does extend the logical volume. Instead of extending you would shrink/reduce it. Checkout the ...


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This bug is noted here: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/parted/+bug/1270203 As noted in the thread, there are two work arounds. The simplest is to simply append "Yes" to the command list: parted --script /dev/sda unit B resizepart 2 1166016512B Yes


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If you don't want to fiddle with dd, gdisk can do: $ sudo gdisk /dev/sdb GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.8 Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: present Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT. Command (? for help): ? b back up GPT data to a file <snip> w write table to disk and exit x extra ...


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At present in my Ubuntu 15.04 UUID version 4 is used for partitions. Version 4 UUIDs use a scheme relying only on random numbers. xxxxxxxx-xxxx-4xxx-yxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx here 4 denotes the version number x is any hexadecimal digit y is one of 8, 9, A, or B Random UUID probability of duplicates Out of a total of 128 bits, two bits indicate an RFC 4122 ...


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UUID of a partition which generated in Linux distribution is version 4. The version 4 UUID is meant for generating UUIDs from truly-random or pseudo-random numbers. It is described in RFC 4122 .


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If the problem is due to the drives moving around putting something like UUID="0ECA6DA1246D89E4" /media/scratch ntfs auto,rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,default_permissions,allow_other,blksize=4096 in /etc/fstab should do the trick. Before you edit it, make a backup Just create /media/scratch (or whatever you want to call it - it ...


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An uuid is just formatted (hyphens at specific places) random bytes so there's nothing magical about it. By glancing at the source, which you can get with apt-get source libuuid1 if you're on a Ubuntu based distro, the uuid generation either uses truly random bytes (known to be rather slow -- you can get those by reading from the /dev/random special file) ...


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Both UUID of GPT partitions, and UUID of filesystems, are generated randomly when the partition/filesystem is created. You can check that they're version 4 UUIDs.


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It's correct in principle but you might consider reducing it to a single parted call. parted --script /device \ mklabel gpt \ mkpart primary 1MiB 100MiB \ mkpart primary 100MiB 200MiB \ ... Your alignment issue is probably because you use MB instead of MiB. You should not need an actual align-check command when creating partitions on MiB ...


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Not enough information. You say "the partition was ... changed to NTFS" but you don't say how. If all that changed was the partition type flag in the partition table (whether DOS or GPT), then that flag can be changed back and all will be fine. You can use gparted, parted, or even fdisk to make that kind of change. If the partition type changed in some ...


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Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


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Is the partition unallocated? Because from the picture in the beginning, where it says "Setting disk label of /dev/sdb to GPT" I think it's trying to give the hard disk an partition-table "GPT". I'll suggest that try allocating the partition. You could try the solution found from this link: OpenSuse Support Boot and run opensuse live. Open up the ...


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To me, if, as you say, grub can't detect your LVM /boot filesystem and grub-mkconfig usually makes a mistake on generating grub.cfg, that seems reason enough to avoid this configuration and switch to something that grub supports better. When you say "just give a proper address to the intended boot partition", I don't know what you mean by "address" or what ...


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It's not a performance problem, it's a troubleshooting and fixing things problem. /boot is the bootstrap location - in there is a few files that start off everything else in your system. And sometimes you need to poke in there to fix a problem (such as grub config or similar). If you have to do this, it's useful to have a lowest common denominators sort of ...


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there are two 2Tb hard disks in RAID. Is there any way I can format them to one single partition on both drives and mount them to lets say /media/attachment For the purposes of this answer I am using /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. It is your responsibility to ensure that this matches your situation. You can do this provided you are happy to erase all the data ...


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You want to have 2 separate disks or still in RAID1? For the first one use mdadm to remove the disks from the raid configuration and the you can use fdisk to create a partition on each of them. With LVM you then can combine them to 1 disk of 4TB.


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Does your disk partitioning tools recognise lvm? If they do Calada gives the right advice. I did a couple tests and file and fdisk on debian both do the right thing, but test the tools you use. $ sudo file -s /dev/sd* /dev/sda: DOS/MBR boot sector /dev/sda1: Linux rev 1.0 ext2 filesystem data, UUID=censored, volume name "boot" /dev/sda2: LVM2 PV (Linux ...


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This was asked recently but it was in the context of local disks. In that situation, there is a good reason to use a partition table on the disk even if you only intend to make it a single big partition spanning the entire disk: documenting the fact that the disk is actually in use, thus preventing accidents. I believe that the situation is different for ...


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You should be able to move forward after choosing the Manual option by hitting Next, which should open a UI to do your own disk formatting. Once there you should be able to create new partitions in the 'free space'. If you can get that far, you have to decide how you want to partition the disk. Personally I use the following scheme which contains 4 ...


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While dual booting is a useful concept to allow you to use both Windows and Linux on the same machine, the benefits of dual booting Linux are more subtle. The boot process in Linux typically involves using a boot loader to load a kernel and ram disk which eventually mounts the root file system and lets you do things. Different distros have different kernels, ...


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This scheme is certainly workable. You are right, the best solution is to transform your current layout as little as it is possible. If you don't ask Arch Linux to install his Grub bootloader, you'll have to run grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg in Ubuntu (if you have os-prober installed, it will find your Arch installation and update all the config ...



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