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1

If you are using mkfs.ext4, you have to pass -E root_owner=your_uid:your_gid, this is usually passed in an 'extra options' textbox in gui partition tools. If you dont do this (< mkfs 1.42) then the person running the gui tool will get the permissions. Nowdays, for security, it assigns them to root:root (0:0). If you ever go back to fat32 or ntfs, you ...


1

Here comes a memo to resize an NTFS partition using commandline with ntfsresize (from the ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs package) and fdisk, that should work for Windows XP-to-8 versions. Note that GParted does all the following for MBR/DOS as well as for EFI/GPT drives if ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs is installed. My references are at the end. OK in this scenario I have a ...


4

A BIOS boot partition doesn't contain a filesystem; it's just a place to put some GRUB code that on an MBR disk would've been located immediately after the boot sector, before the start of the first partition. On a GPT disk, that area is used by the (larger) partition table and isn't available for bootloader code, so the bootloader code goes in a small ...


2

You might be able to re-detect it without reboot, by unloading / re-loading the correct module (or just un-binding and re-binding the driver). For example: [ 978.527221] sd 11:0:0:1: [sdk] Attached SCSI removable disk #~> echo 11:0:0:1 > /sys/bus/scsi/drivers/sd/unbind #~> echo 11:0:0:1 > /sys/bus/scsi/drivers/sd/bind [ 5572.027119] sd ...


1

Had the same problem: Disk that is about to die, with NTFS partition that I wanted to rescue first and fix after (before the disk is totally gone). Was able to resolve it with ntfsclone: Connect the two disks - old and new Boot with Live-Linux from USB (can use Parted Magic for that as well) Create a big-enough partition on the new disk (use gparted for ...


0

Ok, it seems that during my lvextend on the second machine I had forgotten the "+" sign. So, instead of lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/mapper/vg_ddsle012-lv_root I've written lvextend -l 100%FREE /dev/mapper/vg_ddsle012-lv_root so the space wasn't added to the actual size of the logical volume.


0

Sometimes you need to do echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/host<n>/scan It depends on whether you're creating a new disk or extending an existing one as to which type of rescan is required.


9

LVM is not overkill if you have 17 partitions. (IMHO) As for the partition limit, it just happens to be the default. Probably no one expected that many partitions on a device that used to have only a few megs. /usr/src/linux/Documentation/devices.txt: 179 block MMC block devices 0 = /dev/mmcblk0 First SD/MMC card ...


0

Reduce each of the pieces, from the inside out. You'll need to do that with / unmounted, so you'll need to do it from a live CD/USB. SystemRescueCD is good at this kind of things. Note that you need fairly recent version of the LVM and cryptsetup tools. Shrink the / filesystem with resize2fs. resize2fs /dev/mapper/hostname--vg-root 240G Shrink the ...


0

i use this method , not sure if it's the best but works for me use it with caution and not SysAdmin calculate the difference that cause the problem 324%4 = 0 no problem but 324%32 = 10.125 that's the problem so it doesn't fit i think it's called "get real number" lvmdiskscan to list involved partitions then pvresize /dev/*** ...


1

You have overwritten the partition table with an ISO file system. The general expectation is that if a device contains an ISO file system, then that describes the entire contents of the media, and no further partitions are present, because that is how normal data CDs work. The system expects the rest of the media to be inaccessible, again because that is ...


4

After you dd an image to a flash drive, the drive will be divided in 2 parts: the image partition with the image's size and a blank part. That's normal. To get your drive go like before, just format it: mkfs.vfat -I /dev/sdb (as root).


2

You disk size is 14.538 GiB (30489408 sectors * 512 bytes /1024/1024/1024). Its partition table is seriously broken as sdb4 is overlapping sdb1. You should remove sdb4 as soon as possible and in any case, you shouldn't use that fourth partition without a very strong risk of corrupting sdb1 content.


1

Well, if you want them to be /dev/sdb you'll need to remove the partition table entirely. Maybe the most simple way to do that is just to backup the fs and create it anew. sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt tar -C/mnt -cf /tmp/sdb . sudo umount /mnt sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=1kx1k count=4 sudo mkfs.vfat /dev/sdb sudo mount /dev/sdb /mnt tar -C/mnt -xf ...


1

You need to delete both partition sdb1 and sdb4. So that, it will become single storage device, which you can use it by creating one single partition. WARNING: DOING THIS WILL ERASE ALL THE CONTENT OF SDB1 AND SDB4. TAKE A BACKUP IN CASE, THOSE DATA IS VITAL FOR YOU.


0

The luks encryption header does not depend on or record the size of the underlying device. If you simply dd an encrypted partition into a larger encrypted partition, then when you open the new larger partition with cryptsetup luksOpen, its underlying size will be larger, too. If you are using that to store an LVM physical volume, then just run pvresize ...


2

Assuming your volume group is already full, and you cannot extend it further, you will need to: Shrink the filesystem in lv_home using the specific tools for your filesystem, e.g. resize2fs if you use ext3/4. Resize lv_home accordingly with lvreduce. Increase lv_root with lvresize. Increase the filesystem in lv_root so that it uses all the additional ...


2

First off, you want to unmount the partitions in question. Boot an usb stick or similar. Backing up important data is always recommended before fiddling with filesystems. Reduce the filesystem first in /dev/mapper/vg_dckapstaging-lv_home. Otherwise, resizing the lv will drop the data. The way to do it depends naturally from filesystem. resize2fs works for ...


1

This is a risky operation you should try to clean / (have a look at /var/log /var/spool and delete old and big file) theorical way to proceed include fsck -F /dev/mapper/vg_dckapstaging-lv_home lvresize --size -15G /dev/mapper/vg_dckapstaging-lv_home resize2fs /home lvresize --size +15G /dev/mapper/vg_dckapstaging-lv_root resize2fs / Disclaimer 3.1. be ...


0

dd count=$((132552703-2048)) copies 132552703-2048 blocks of 512 bytes from the beginning of the input. The block size in fdisk is 1 kB = 1024 bytes. So you have three problems: You specified a size that's half what you wanted. You didn't indicate that you wanted to start the copy at an offset. Your subtraction has a fencepost error: it misses the last ...


0

first of all, here's how: First do almost as you did before, but no subtraction - and add one to the count. dd count=132552704 </dev/sda >img Next print the partition table at a sed process which can screen out the ones which you're removing. sed will write a delete command to a second fdisk which has opened your img file for every partition ...


0

It isn't possible because dd is only direct 1 input to 1 output --the restoration would be damage because you merged 3 partitions in one and this isn't a backup and dd is only for identical copies. Your answer would be possible: dd if=/dev/sda1 of=~/hdadisk1.img; dd if=/dev/sda2 of=~/hdadisk2.img dd if=/dev/sda3 of=~/hdadisk3.img (In a script if you ...


0

Generally speaking, you cannot resize or change at all any partition on a storage device that is currently mounted. That means that your system needs to be down if you intend to modify the root partition, since you cannot unmount it. (I found, however, exceptions like ext4 to what I wrote here. See this question here) You will need to boot in an external OS ...


0

Try to boot any Linux from USB or CD and then with GParted change disk size. This worked for me fine.


0

If you're new to programming, 90% that you're using Windows ! I'll show you details: With Linux: browsing the web: if you usually play flash game or flash video, you should install and use Google Chrome (not Chromium), which Adobe Flash was built-in! It's not too easy and natural to get flash cover on other browser, and they're no longer releasing new ...


0

You cannot handle simfs like common block devices. If you have enough spare storage on the HN, just assign more to that container: # vzctl set CTID --save --diskspace 100G


0

Try searching for what is suddenly using the space ? Search for all files in root filesystem modified in the last 3 days: find / -xdev -mtime -3 -ls


0

Another approach is to create a LVM spanned on a full disk instead of a partition. In this case you can hot add disk using following method blockscan --rereadpt /dev/<PV disk pvresize /dev/<PV disk> # The associated VG is now resized lvresize /dev/mapper/<LV> -r -l +100%FREE


0

Shutdown the machine you want to duplicate Create a new machine Add the virtual disk of the old machine to the new one Boot the new machine and use ddrescue to create an image of the partition you want to duplicate Transfer the image to a physical machine Copy the image (again using ddrescue) to the disks of the new computers Restore the old virtual machine ...


0

Write the partition to the host disc and then just use rsync that, and run 3 in parallel, with a bit of luck your host only reads the data once from disc before putting it on the network. That worked well for me. You can try to muck with broadcasting or setting up some torrent and have the other 3 machines seed each other, but I doubt that makes things ...


0

Yes, you understand correctly. You can run multiple operating systems on one PC. If you install any modern Linux distro on your computer, keeping the Windows partitions, you'll be able to select the OS on each boot. If you want to keep it short and simple, use one of the 'easier to use' distros like Linux Mint or Ubuntu. At least those two have an ...


0

In general, you should try to have as few VGs as possible (VGs can be spanned across multiple PVs with vgextend). It makes things easier to manage when a single VG spans all PVs and you can just use pvmove to migrate LVs to a different physical device. What I've found over the years with Software RAID, as you get into the larger disk sizes, is that ...


2

You have to unmount the drive before you can resize the partition. You will need to use a live CD/usb. Once you boot using the live CD you can repartition the drive. If one of the OS that you are installing is windows you probably want to start with that and then add linux. While you can certainly do it in either order it tends to be easier to do windows ...


2

It is not something I would do online but I think it is possible. I guess you are using ext4. umount /home $ umount /home shrink the /home filesystem $ fsck -f /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home $ resize2fs /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home 80G shrink the /home logical volume $ lvreduce -L -40G /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home resize the /home partition to the size of ...


1

You cannot resize or change at all any partition on a storage device that is currently mounted. That means that your system needs to be shutdown if you intend to modify the root partition (since you cannot unmount it) You will need to boot in an external OS (e.g. using a live-CD) to perform these tasks. I would recommend you to backup any sensible data ...


0

After google, i found the below answer and implemented successfully. Cant create more than one extended partition. Instead resize the existing extend partition to use the unallocated space. To resize it, use the ubuntu live USB and start the ubuntu os with the option "try with out installing". if the existing partition contain a swap partition then, stop it ...


0

I have used "TestDisk" program to retrieve the lost partition, and it worked like magic


1

To enable the swap device you can swapon /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 If there is an error with that swap space, because it was destroyed somehow, you can reformat the swap device with mkswap /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 Check the related manual pages swapon(1) and mkswap(1) for more information.



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