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0

To online resize the filesystem, especially /, you need to have some form of abstraction between the physical and virtual layer, e.g. LVM. To live resize with LVM use: pvcreate /dev/sdX vgcreate vg1 /dev/sdX lvcreate Root -L10G Then next time the disk is about to be full, you will use lvextend /dev/mapper/vg1-Root -L+10G --resizefs and voilá you got ...


0

I guess you have GPT table and Kali can't manage them while installation. If you use parted /dev/sda print you'd see all of your partitions. To fix it, you should wait Kali fixes its installer (or maybe there are some patch/tricks available, I don't know Kali)


2

Your partition table looks OK, but it's a bit odd. In particular, most partitioning tools put a data structure known as an Extended Boot Record (EBR) in the sector immediately preceding the logical partition it describes. In your case, though, there's no gap between your logical partitions 5 and 6, so your partition 6's EBR must be located somewhere else. ...


0

Download gparted LIVECD iso from here From your VM Choose the iso file and boot as live CD Once tha gparted Live Cd runs you can use gparted now Choose the partition to resize and choose the new size and then apply When end reboot and be sure to remove the iso file attached to the VM CD ROM, and boot to your Ubuntu.


4

The same tools that you can use for other files (generally) can also be used on block devices. This means that you can use, for example, xxd or hexdump to inspect the filesystem: $ sudo xxd /dev/sda2 | head -10 00000000: eb58 9053 5953 4c49 4e55 5800 0200 0000 .X.SYSLINUX..... 00000010: 0000 0000 0000 0000 3f00 ff00 0008 2000 ........?..... . 00000020: ...


0

The kernel will use the old (cached) partition table until you unmount all partitions on the affected disk. Since you can't do it with the / partition, the option you have is to reboot. Next time try to use LVM.


1

That is a mess of partitions you have going on. I would just start over and do a custom partitioning job and don't let YaST make any suggestions. At that point, it'll leave your 2TB alone. Then you should be able to resize your SSD and install.


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From Ubuntu (in VM) Install gparted by executing sudo apt-get install gparted in Terminal. Open gparted either from terminal or from dash. Then extend you disk, maybe you may have to move your extended partition at the end of disk.


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As far as i know NTFS-read&write is standard installed/enabled on most Ubuntu versions nowadays. For linux-n00bs (like myself) this worked perfectly: How to Mount Partitions Automatically on Start Up in Ubuntu 14.04


3

The "DOS mode" that the man page is referring to is a mode that keeps partitions aligned on cylinder boundaries, which have been an anachronism since the late 90's. In other words, it defaults to letting partitions start and end on any sector. The DOS disklabel, otherwise known as MBR, is the conventional PC partition table, as opposed to GPT, which is ...


0

Make sure that you have parted version 3.2, then run parted /dev/sda and use the resizepart command to resize sda2, moving the end of the partition to the end of the disk. Then run resize2fs /dev/sda2 to enlarge the filesystem to use the additional space. Reboot not required.


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For the benefits and some additional information of partitioning, check out: http://askubuntu.com/questions/516353/what-are-the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-mounting-various-directories-on-sep


0

There is generally no benefit to creating further partitions. Having a separate swap partition used to be the only way to have swap on linux ( a really long time ago ), and the habit still sticks around. You can use a swap file instead though. The reason for a separate /boot is if your bios is broken and can not access the entire disk, then you need to ...


0

cfdisk only writes the MBR of your disk, it doesn't wipe the rest of the disk. If you layout your new partitions to start at the same location as the start of partitions previously your installer might detect that. From what you describe you either previously had some swap space where you wanted a ext4 partition to reside, or maybe you had the partition ...


0

These are all the steps required to resize a LVM or LVM2 partition - sudo lvresize --verbose --resizefs -L -150G /dev/ubuntu/root sudo pvresize --setphysicalvolumesize {any size here} /dev/sda5 /dev/sda5: cannot resize to xxxxx extents as later ones are allocated. You have to rearrange the unallocated space at the end of the LVM. That means after root ...


2

(I know this is an old question, I came across this problem myself and got my FS back to life without ddrescue, so I'll share the expericence for anyone else encountering this) Ext filesystems store backups of the superblock -- for an occasion just like this one. First, determine the locations of the backups: mke2fs -n /dev/sdxx This is a test run (i.e. ...


0

Select manual partitioning and create two new partitions in the free space: A small one (about 500 MB), which you format with a Linux file system (e.g. ext4). Select /boot as mount point for it. For the remaining space, choose "Use as: physical volume for encryption". Afterwards, go through the process of configuring encrypted volumes (in the top of the ...


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You can use Kickstart. An excerpt from https://gist.github.com/ludo/3652811 example: bootloader --location=mbr zerombr yes clearpart --all --initlabel part /boot --fstype=ext2 --size=64 part swap --size=1024 part / --fstype=ext4 --size=1 --grow


3

Depends on what you're after. If you want to check which of the partitions in /dev/sd* has a default mountpoint and what that mountpoint is, you could do for part in /dev/sd*; do grep -w "$part" /etc/fstab | awk '{print $1,$2}; done However, on most modern systems, partitions are mounted by UUID and not dev name, so a better approach1 would be: for uuid ...


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Another approach is with findmnt: findmnt /dev/sda4 ...to get mountpoint from dev. Or vice-versa: findmnt /home


4

You're actually asking two questions. The easiest thing to do if you want to know where your home is: cd df -h . Or df -h $HOME Where is /tmp mounted? df -h /tmp ...etc. If you want to know what is mounted on a certain device, mount | grep ^/dev/sda1 (for example). Or mount | grep ^/dev/sd to see all the sd's.


6

You can use: mount for a list of all mounted filesystems and mount options for each of them; lsblk for a tree of block devices, size and mount point (if mounted); df for a list of mounted block devices, size, used space, available space and mount point.


2

You can use mount command. It also shows options with which the mounting is done.


2

You're looking for the df command.


2

I'm a fan of LVM but I don't think it is required in this case - if all you want to do is to expand your sda1 filesystem to use the rest of the space on this drive. Assuming you don't at the moment have any data on your sda3, a better strategy is: with fdisk it is hard to work out the actual sizes of the partitions, use swapon -s to show the size of your ...


1

First, you can't extend /dev/sda1 to include /dev/sda3 as their space allocations are NOT contiguous. You'd have to dump everything, re-layout the partitioning, and restore. Second, /dev/sda1 does not to appear to be an LVM partition. Even if you wanted to add the apparently unclaimed physical volume created in /dev/sda3, this would not be possible. ...



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