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Solved, I opened the device and found the hard disk disconnected from the socket


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Essential filesystem structures are addressed relatively to the start of the filesystem, which happens to be the same as the start of the block device. Since your filesystem is implicitly expected to start on the first block of the block device, it tolerates no offset at any time between the first block of the block device and the first block of the ...


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You probably need to install e4fsprogs CentOS package before you want to create an ext4 filesystem. In general, mkfs is just a front-end for a series of mkfs.* binaries. See the following example: root@locutus:/home/asd# strace -f -e trace=execve mkfs -t asdasd /dev/whatever execve("/sbin/mkfs", ["mkfs", "-t", "asdasd", "/dev/whatever"], [/* 18 vars */]) ...


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I have found no such tool and don't want to write one. What I did was to treat the expert recipes as standard text files that I edit online with ACE editor. Before sending the recipe to the preseed file in the mako template, I use this function to convert the text into a form ready for debconf. ...


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NOTE: You have not to use LVM for / and /boot But DB: DB always be stored in /var such as mysql and psql, So need a big space for it. You can create the following question from yourself: Do we have syslog center? Do we have more than 10 effective user account? What's size of our memory? (for size of swap) What do we have packages? What's your hdd size? ...


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It turns out that I needed to run the following: sudo update-grub This updated my /boot/grub/grub.cfg file and got rid of the windows 7 option.


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If, as it seems from the info you gave, you have no other OS installed than Linux, an option would be to disable os-prober. Two ways of doing this: Set GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER=true in your grub defaults file (/etc/default/grub? - Not sure on Mint) Remove the os-prober package (if it's missing, grub-mkconfig will skip that part) What may be happening is ...


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Grub's menu comes from a configuration file, not by scanning hardware. However, the configuration file can be created by scanning hardware, which you would want to do after you've changed partitions around. The command to do this is either grub-mkconfig (Debian derived) or grub2-mkconfig (Fedora derived). I presume Mint would be the former but in any ...


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The first problem some windows pcs have is that they have secureboot enabled by default which makes booting up another os impossible.You need disable secureboot in the efi/bios(can't help you more with this problem because i use mac-hardware). 2.I like to know to which particular error you got in elementary os(the os i use),Did you try Luna or Freya?Did ...


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Personally, it seems the entire hard drive failed, or the entire hard drive is corrupt. At any rate, I've experienced this before. The files are impossible to access.


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The lvmcache(7) manpage describes how you can remove the cache pool without removing its origin volume: Removing a cache pool LV without removing its linked origin LV This writes back data from the cache pool to the origin LV when necessary, then removes the cache pool LV, leaving the un-cached origin LV. lvremove VG/CachePoolLV Example: ...


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GParted is often worth using because it helps avoid several nasty mistakes. I guess the main advantage of command-line tools here is to have more visibility of details. This can be useful in unexpectedly fragile situations (at least once it's broken, the details might help you realize why). However I wouldn't recommend using them to others unless they ...


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You need the ntfsresize utility from the ntfs-3g package, which can resize NTFS file system. However, be sure to backup the partition before you make any changes to it, since sometimes Windows have other ideas of what the resized partition should look like. The backup can be conveniently performed with the ntfsclone utility (same package), since that saves ...


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From TLDP: This directory is provided so that the system administrator may temporarily mount a filesystem as needed. The content of this directory is a local issue and should not affect the manner in which any program is run This means you can simply create the /mnt directory as instructed in the other answers. Since there was nothing mounted under /mnt ...


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Yes, all you have to do is to (as root) mkdir /mnt chmod 755 /mnt The chmod is necessary to ensure that the mountpoint works correctly.


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Create /mnt as root and: chmod 755 /mnt


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It looks like @slm has some wonky math, or at least doesn't match the fdisk -l output. From the revisions it looks like adding the u parameter to fdisk changed from cylinders to sectors? Dunno, but it doesn't do anything on mine since the default should be sectors. On my image: $ fdisk -l bone-debian-7.5-2015-01-14-beaglebone.img Disk ...


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You could move your extended (swap space) to the end of unallocated space and then resize sda1. By moving I mean you could simply delete it, resize sda1 and then create the swap space at the end of the disk.


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This might have been the case for you, and just in case anyone else runs into this problem, I had this problem before and found that having gparted or another partition editor can block the partition table reading. Close gparted and try again, it might be as simple as that.


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I think I experienced a similar issue which CentOS 7. Try to partition everything with another linux (install) media (gparted or arch for example) and then just enter the mountpoints and filesystems but not click on reformat


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dd if=/dev/mapper/storage2-crypto bs=16 count=1 2>/dev/null | od -t c -t x1 0000000 L U K S 272 276 \0 001 a e s \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 4c 55 4b 53 ba be 00 01 61 65 73 00 00 00 00 00 That's what it looks like on my system. See http://wiki.cryptsetup.googlecode.com/git/LUKS-standard/on-disk-format.pdf (page 6) The ...


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The logical partitions (like sda1, sda2) of the physical disks (like sda, sdb) are the partitions. So partitioning is the task of modifying the partition tables of these physical disks. The Folders are only mount points where you can mount the partitions. I guess because the most partitions have a specific mount point (like /home) its obvious to name the ...


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You can't tell what each partition is for from /proc/partitions, that only tells you the partition numbers and their sizes. Given the numbering, with a one-sector sda3 and no partition numbered 4, this is an MBR-type partition table where sda3 is an extended partition; since Windows needs to boot from a primary partition, the Windows partition has to be ...


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I am a user of btrfs. In the past I used it for both the root and the home partitions. Now I'm using btrfs for the root and XFS for the home partition (because of openSUSE, as you pointed out). I cannot notice any differences, except one: with XFS, I can't snapshot my home anymore. Btrfs is fairly stable nowadays, however, you should always have backups ...


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From the Wikipedia entry: [The] maximum disk size supported on disks using 512-byte sectors (whether real or emulated) by the MBR partitioning scheme (without using non-standard methods) is limited to 2 TB. 2TB = 2*1024*1024*1024*1024 = 2^41 = 2^32 * 2^9, and 2^9 is 512.


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If all you did was delete the partition and not reused its space, then the program testdisk should have no trouble finding and recovering the partition. Take this as an opportunity to learn the lesson that if you don't backup your important data, it will be lost sooner or later.


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I have noticed flash drives dont like to be changed from their native fs. Rather use a tool to create a bootable flash drive, perhaps use a disk image? pendrivelinux has a whole bunch of different tools. Yumi is great for multi-oses and it supports persistence on some linux distros. The mounting permissions problem probably has to do with what is ...


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Intel MacBook Pro's use GUID partition table for disk partitioning which one can edit with gdisk. A copy of the partition table metadata is usually stored as backup of the primary. You can read more detail about it on the Arch Wiki here You need first to know the device name, /dev/sda, /dev/sdb of your Mac disk. You can use the blkid, lsblk or dmesg ...


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Although on modern systems, a file's sectors can be accessed anywhere on a disk, it still makes sense to confine boot materials to their own boot partition, simply from the principle of "do not put all the eggs in in one basket". Suppose that the main filesystem is corrupt in such a way that some lower-stage bootloader is not able to read the next stage ...


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Another reason for bootpartition these days are: booting from NFS or NBD encrypted root partition /boot shared betweed different distributions


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First make sure that the partition you need to replace is at least the same size as the one you will copy. If your image files are not compressed, they can be mounted as loopback file systems using kpartx. Copying file systems across disk images You'll need LVM2 for this to work. Let disk1.img and disk2.img, assuming both images are the exact same size in ...


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BOOTING IS HARD Booting... well... it really is the hardest part. Every time a computer boots it basically meets itself anew. It acquaints itself with its various parts, and for each one it meets it gains capability. But it has to pull itself up by its own bootstraps, so to speak, from square one every time. The trick is - when designing a boot process - ...


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The history /boot contains files that aren't used by the operating system, but by its bootloader. You'll find both files of the bootloader itself (like /boot/grub/* for Grub) and the Linux kernel (/boot/vmlinuz*) and often an associated initrd or initramfs. On a PC with legacy BIOS (as opposed to the newer UEFI found on most recent computers), the software ...


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This wasn't a limitation of the Linux distribution, but was a limitation of older BIOSes. bAck in those days, to ensure Linux could boot, all the boot related files were placed in their own partition which was made the first partition on the hard drive to ensure the boot loader fell within the first 1024 cylinders. Create a partition that is smaller than ...


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The below steps extended my partition from 12G to 26GB on a VMWare EXSi 5.5 running Centos 6 EXT4 VPS. 1) Identify the device name, which is by default /dev/sda, and confirm the new size by running the command: # fdisk -l 2) Get list of partitions for /dev/sda device: # ls -al /dev/sda* brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 0 Dec 29 15:32 /dev/sda brw-rw---- 1 ...


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It can also be very orderly to have a separate /boot partition. On my machine, I have many distros and backups, each in their own partitions, but they all share the same /boot partition, which is where all kernels for all OS reside. Also, all distros point to my one and only copy of lilo.conf which is also in /boot, so I never have to guess what the heck is ...



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