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Disk is part of active ZFS pool? In this case - detach disk from pool or destroy pool first, then create gpt table..


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Your drive is formatted using extended and logical partitions. The MBR partition table format allows only 4 primary partitions, so /dev/sda1 - /dev/sda4 are reserved for primary and extended partitions. If you want more than 4 partitions, then you have to use logical partitions within an extended partition. In your case: /dev/sda1 is a primary partition ...


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Why can I rest assured that GNU Parted has not corrupted a single bit after shrinking my partition? You can't, in fact, gparted man page clearly says (under NOTES): Editing partitions has the potential to cause LOSS of DATA. ...... You are advised to BACKUP your DATA before using the gparted application. Reboot your system after resizing the ...


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There are several utilities that function in a similar way that you can use for this: md5sum, sha1sum ... sha512sum: On your current partition: find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum > /var/tmp/checksum.lst and then in the directory of your backup: < /var/tmp/checksum.lst md5sum -c You can replace md5sum with any of the other commands. ...


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The partition table is changed, this stores the start and end block number of the partitions. This table is not in the partition, and therefore not in the file-system. Various block addresses are changed within the file-system (this is part of the file-system meta-data). This is part of the mapping from directory entries to physical locations. None of this ...


2

Partition layout is a different level than the one on which the files with user (or system) data live. Partition schemes divide a block device, usually a hard drive, into several regions, which operating system kernel can use to support file systems, which in turn are used for hosting files. When you resize a partition that already holds some file system, ...


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Your disk is usually structured using a partition table like this: A partitions usually contains a file system, which in turn contains all your files and directories. If you shrink a partition you first have to shrink the file system to cover less space of the partition, afterwards you can shrink the partition. The details of shrinking a file system ...


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What is changed is the partition table. None of the files in the partitions are changed. Traditionally the partition table is stored in the MBR (Master Boot Record). Alternatively you may have a GPT (GUID partition table).


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I know this is very old issue, but many people are looking for that resolve. For this example you have typical situation. On the beginning is single partition, and on the end swap partition is located. it isn't good because swap can be havely loaded, and end of rotated disk is the slowest part of it. what I suggest? 1. Create boot partition at the begin. ...


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There is no need to have a separate home partition at all. The only problem with this configuration, is that if you ever need to reinstall from scratch, then you will need to backup your /home, as the root partition is usually formated again on new install. If you have your /home separated, you can safely reinstall keeping your data.


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Before you can resize any ntfs based partition, you need to ensure all the files are pushed up to the start of the partition. This is acomplisehd by running the defragmentation process on the partition within windowsXP. It may also be useful to delete any temporal files or any other stuff you don't want from the windows partition. In addition, deleting the ...


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Try running a chkdsk and/or scandisk in Windows [to rule out bad sectors & other inconcistencies] then attempt to resize.


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If you want to possibly * remove everything then you can do your dd command; however, you'll still need to create a partition table. NOTE I'm going to use /dev/sdb because that is what you have in your original question I recommend fdisk. So you would do something like the following: # fdisk /dev/sdb Command (m for help): n Select (default p): p Partition ...


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"fdisk" and "parted" are command line commands to deal with disk partition tables. You may try with them.


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It's better to use testdisk, because it's partition problem : testdisk


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My guess is that Windows XP places a master file table at the end of the partition, preventing you from resizing it. You should be able to move the master file table from within XP. Also maybe you need to defrag the Windows partition? And finally, are you sure you unmounted sda1? Run df in a terminal and make sure you don't see /dev/sda1 anywhere in the ...


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In KDE there is 'kvpm' available. I use it to handle all LVM related issue when I have a GUI available. sudo apt-get install kvpm


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Maybe the disk has a hybrid partition table (both MBR and GPT) with both parts not in sync. You could have a look at the second sector of the disk and (after a backup) overwrite it with zeros: dd if=/dev/sda skip=512 bs=1 count=16 | command od -t c -t x1 backup with dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/whatever/sector1.dd skip=1 count=1 overwrite with dd ...


3

Lack of partitions is a common cause for needing recovery in the first place. A partition table is the most common / standard way to declare that the disk is in use (and thanks to various partition types, it usually also declares what exactly each partition is used for). An unpartitioned disk looks like an unused disk to many programs; installers select ...


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This was true once - once upon a time drives were smaller (and slower), as were tapes. If you have a large raid group, and suffer a (compound) fault - all data on that raid group must be recovered. As sizes increase, so too do the numbers of tapes required. So a large filesystem, where you're doing a full restore might mean recovering everything and ...


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To illustrate the question in a simple and efficient manner, consider two scenarios: You install your favourite linux distribution on entire disk i.e. without any partitions: Suppose your system is crashed because operating system is unable to access some sectors and unable to boot. You lost some chunk of data due to bad sectors and because of that you ...


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In Linux the word "driver" is used as much as "kernel modules" that support certain hardware. Kernel support is decided when the options are selected and the kernel is compiled from source and comes in two forms, static or as a dynamically loaded module. (Monolithic versus micro-kernel) A static module is a fixed part of the kernel and the core ...


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Yes, if there is disk device as /dev/sda this mean driver for this type of disk is loaded. You can check the exact driver by executing ls -l /dev/sda brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 0 Apr 8 2014 /dev/sda And in this case you have major number = 8, so you can search in kernel source what is this driver There is no such thing as running partition. Also ...


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From the Arch Wiki: When creating a partition, parted might warn about improper partition alignment but does not hint about proper alignment. For example: (parted) mkpart primary fat16 0 32M Warning: The resulting partition is not properly aligned for best performance. Ignore/Cancel? The warning means ...


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The OpenSuSE install can help you do this by resizing and creating your partitions for you. It should automatically use your swap partition. If not then you'll go to advanced partition settings when installing and have the swap partition be mounted to swap. However, if you want to free do this by hand (I would not recommend it). First umount the /dev/sda2 ...


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A minor correction. As I understand it, GPT disks don't have partition types anymore, they are all "primary". Command 'mkpart primary' doesn't create a primary partition like it does on msdos disks, it just creates a partition called primary. You can just as well use command (parted) mkpart Parted-FUN! 21476MB 4000787MB (parted) print Model: ATA ...



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