Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

So, based on @wurtel's answer and the research I've done, here's the script and the steps I came up with. 1) Unmount the "home" partition umount /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2) Resize the "home" filesystem to a size of 2G resize2fs -p /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2G 3) Reduce the size of the "home" logical volume to 2,1G (the volume needs to be a little bit bigger ...


1

Ignore the first "rootfs" entry, the real mount is shown by the /dev/mapper/APP05-root line. To reduce filesystem size, first shrink the filesystem size with resize2fs, and then use lvresize to reduce the device size. To increase the size, use the utilities in reverse order. Reducing the filesystem size needs to be done while the filesystem is not mounted. ...


0

If kpartx is available to you, you can try kpartx -a /dev/mmcblk0


2

This is going to be tricky to fix by hand. I hope you haven't modified any more data on this disk, apart from the broken partition table you wrote to it. Using sfdisk, fdisk, etc to create a backup of the partition table is a good idea (when you don't accidentally type the wrong command :) ). But for extra insurance I like to back up the boot sectors of my ...


1

1) What is wrong here, since syslinux is supposed to support ext2 partitions? Yes, Syslinux supports ext2 fs via Extlinux. If you are using a UEFI/EFI based system then you need a fat32 partition. For GPT only you don't need to have a fat32 partition, just go with the traditional. i.e. ext? 2) Do I have to install a MBR, isn't syslinux compatible ...


1

Not having partitions is like having a partition starting at sector 0 which is aligned (unless you have something crazy like an off-by-1 offset jumper for old OS that start at sector 63, in which case you'd have the same alignment issues with partitions...). With a partition table, making a partition that starts at 0 is usually not possible since that's ...


0

Looking at the Wikipedia page on BIOS boot partitions it looks as though it's really your choice. excerpt The BIOS boot partition is typically quite small. It can be as small as about 30 KiB; however, future boot loaders might require more space, so creating a larger BIOS boot partition is advisable. Due to the 1 MiB partition alignment, policies ...


0

gpart is the best one. There you have the parameter on gpart add -a 4K for example. By -a gives alignment and 4K you should use as a parameter for alignment, because the most new disks are working with 4K sectors. Even on old disks it has a reason, just to getting used to 4K.


1

Do you have any securelevel set? Because a securelevel inhibits EVEN the root from writing onto disks!!! It does not look to me like a broken disk, because with a broken disk you would get a storm of I/O errors over several monitor pages at least. He there just says that he can not do it because he has no permission to do that. If you are root, it might be ...


0

Yes, if you run into problems like this a good way how to resolve it is cat /dev/zero >/dev/disk(whole one) so that it zeroes it all out and then start over with properly aligned disk. It throws sometimes errors when it finds parts of the bootcode that was in there before.


1

If this is your objective, you can create the logical volume and specify the extents for its placement: lvcreate -l 100 -n lvol1 vg01 /dev/sdb1:900-999 In this example, you would be creating a 100-extend logical volume named 'lvol1' on 'vg01', using the physical volume 'sdb1', extents 900 through 999. In the case of existing logical volumes, if you have ...


0

Just a thought. There might be hidden files on the rootfs partition. Remount rootfs on mnt and check the sizes of /mnt/home, /mnt/var, /mnt/opt, /mnt/usr, /mnt/dev, /mnt/sys, /mnt/proc, /mnt/run and /mnt/tmp. mount --bind / /mnt du -s /mnt/home /mnt/var /mnt/opt /mnt/usr /mnt/dev /mnt/proc /mnt/sys /mnt/run /mnt/tmp Those directories should be mostly ...


1

You have a 1TiB hard drive with only 10GiB or so used. While it would be possible to expand this 10GiB partition up to a TiB or any size in between, an alternative solution is to add another separate partition for your home directories. For example, add a new partition (/dev/sda6) and move the contents of your /home directory to it (this will need to be ...


1

The Standard of Practice is to enter into a Linux recovery environment. Any distribution Live-CD will enable you to access your computer in a manner appropriate to resize your hard drive partitions. Resizing partitions is based on the ability to work on your drive without having the drive actually mounted. $> fdisk -l Invoking the command above will ...


9

You can't convert, but can reformat the partition. Boot into Ubuntu or from a live CD and format the partition from there. Be careful not to format the wrong partition. mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdx1


2

As this is not the root partition (/) you should be able to do this without losing data, if you login as the normal user, various files under your home directory are updated (from background email reading, surfing etc.). You don't want to lose emails that arrived between the backup and the restore). The important thing to be able to repartition being is ...


0

You might take a look at something like clonezilla. With clonezilla on a small usb stick and somewhere to backup the data to (local or network), you could pretty much do exactly what you described - copy it out, delete the partition, re-partition it with both a different filesystem and smaller size, and then restore it. Working directly with the partition ...


1

for the resize2fs bit, it's like this: e2fsck -f /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest 96M #always a bit smaller than the LV ### then the rest as above lvresize -l 100M /dev/myvg/lvtest vgreduce myvg /dev/sdX ###then regrow that to fit the volume perfectly lvresize -l 100% /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest I hope you're on ext2/3/4 . ...


0

When pv/vg/lvdisplaying, you may find the -C option helpful. Most of the time, we only need to see what it tells us; eg lvdisplay -C . When you resize2fs and lvresize (or lvreduce), make sure your resize2fs gives you a volume SMALLER than your lvresize command gives. Very occasionally, if you don't have the FS smaller than the LV by a tiny amount, bad ...


0

This is was an embarrasing layer 8 problem. I was trying to install this iso debian-testing-ia64-DVD-1.iso which has compatibility problems with many motherboards AND is a live CD not a debian installer iso. I downloaded the debian net installer and that solved the issue.


0

It's easiest to: Use VBoxManage to resize the Virtual Disk. You've already done this. Download A Gparted Live ISO Set Virtualbox to boot the GParted Live CD, on the VM Disk you resized in step 1. Complete the Resizing Operations in GParted, as GParted >=0.14.x supports LVM Shutdown the VM and remove the ISO from the virtual drive. Restart the VM. Twiddle ...


0

I had a lot of similar troubles. A few things: do the VDI resize whilst the machine is powered off resize the partition with fdisk before resizing anything related to LVM you've possibly set your /dev/sda2 to extend past the end of the disk if you also have /dev/sda1 (you used the full 20G for /dev/sda2, but it probably does not start at 0) I found this ...


0

There is plenty of space in your /home but this space is currently allocated to the centos-home logical volume, and cannot be used on another one. You should either reduce or re-create centos-home to a smaller size to retrieve some unallocated space. To reduce (assuming /home fs is ext4 and you want to set 100G for it): # umount /home # e2fsck -f ...


0

This is a very interesting FOSS-support problem. UEFI BIOS enabled motherboards tend to be problematic. This really can't be as bad as the Power-VR graphics support issue I solved earlier this year, and I seriously doubt we will be requiring any kernel hacking, as this issue is with GRUB. I am aware that you are requiring dual-boot capabilities. Therefore, ...


1

You should build your own Debian image according to the instructions contained in this link: Debian UEFI-BIOS Compatibility I've done this before, following this exact guide. Let me know if you have any questions.


-1

Depends on your application, doesn't it? I think you should have some swap space, perhaps even as small as half the RAM size. You don't want your system to choke.


0

Another alternative: HDD are cheap ($50 will buy you a 500GB HDD, and under $100 for a 1TB HDD). Install a second HDD and install a fresh, new install of linux. For safety, disconnect the current HDD prior to install, then install the new HDD and the new Linux, then reconnect the old HDD, and rsync everything you want to keep onto the new HDD. You can ...


0

Run du -x / to see what is occupying space on the root filesystem. 320MB is not much, but it should be ok as long as you have a single kernel package installed. Remove all the kernel versions except the one you want to reboot to. Run dpkg -l 'linux-image-*' to see what kernel packages are installed. uname -rshows which version you're running now, but if ...


3

If the filesystem is ext2, ext3 or ext4, then you can use the command tune2fs to find out particulars about a given filesystem on a device. $ sudo tune2fs -l <dev> Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sda2 tune2fs 1.42.8 (20-Jun-2013) Filesystem volume name: <none> Last mounted on: /boot Filesystem UUID: ...


2

In order to recover this installation, I suggest: download & boot RIP Linux (11.7 is a version I prefer, although there is 13.7 available too); if you have problems booting the ISO, remember that for RIP Linux is enough to start the kernel and rootfs.cgz as initrd, making it very simple to boot even from an existing installation with gparted resize ...



Top 50 recent answers are included