New answers tagged

1

If I understand you correctly, you want to use the free space on sdd2 for creating another Partition sdd3. To do that, you first need to resize the physical volume (if you haven't done that already) using pvresize. First have a look at how big your physical volume is using pvdisplay /dev/sdd2. If it already has the correct size, skip to the next step. ...


2

In addition to mkdrive2's answer you may want to consider just creating a new partition and using that for large data. Resizing partitions can be tricky, especially if the /home partition is in physically located between other partitions. It always carries a risk that something might go wrong, so be sure to make a backup before you change partitions with a ...


0

Well the only way I can think of might take a long time to process: First delete your swap partition using Gparted or sth alike. The space that was allocated to it is now free, but you can't just attach it to your HOME partition because they're separated by your root partition sda6. In order to allocate your /home more space, you have to free the ...


2

ext4 should be resilient against even pulling the plug. However, in order to be so, it requires the storage subsystem to not lose committed writes. First, confirm that you're not mounting with barrier=0/nobarrier. That often improves performance, at the cost of corruption if a proper shutdown isn't performed. Also check your kernel logs to make sure ...


0

mtools comes with an utility mlabel which might do the job. mlabel -N aaaa1111 /dev/sdb1 Apart from that you might have to resort to a hex editor. The dosfstools only lets you change the label using the fatlabel command (which mlabel does too, just without the volume id). If you're willing to re-create the filesystem from scratch, the value can also be ...


0

use below command tune2fs partition_name -U useb_id_what_you_want use uuidgen to generate random UUID


0

I also posted this question on SuperUser and got the following excellent answer from 'Deltik'... You have a filesystem inside a logical volume inside volume group which encompasses all of your physical volume inside your now-64GiB block device. What you have done through GParted was extend the physical volume to fill the block device, and the ...


0

In the end the answer seems to be the following: The name comes from the remainder of the CD-ROM data (which in retrospect is embarrassingly obvious) You can't change it because it's not even meant to be used or even to be there - after all, you want to use the USB flash drive as a disk, not a CD-ROM. These two have different formats. Generally there is no ...


2

If the decrypted volume is /dev/mapper/crypto then you can get the information with dmsetup table crypto 0 104853504 crypt aes-cbc-essiv:sha256 000[...]000 0 254:2 4096 If the encrypted volume is /dev/storage2/crypto then you get the information with cryptsetup luksDump /dev/storage2/crypto LUKS header information for /dev/storage2/crypto Version: ...


1

fdisk -l or sfdisk -l will do the trick and blkid yourdevice can give you informations about the type, the uid and the filesystem on your device


0

I am understanding, that you already have one linux-swap partition (ada0s3). If this is the case, just add the partition to /etc/fstab If not, I recommend you to use fdisk for MBR partition tables or gdisk for GPT partition tables instead to edit the partition table as you want and then execute: mkswap partition, swapon partition and then add the partition ...


2

The kernel maintains a copy of the partition table in memory. It doesn't actually remember where the partition table is stored, so it doesn't detect that the partition table has changed on the disk. That's why you're still seeing the partition that was there before. You need to tell the kernel to parse the disk again to update its in-memory partition table. ...


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In a Linux terminal (console) type : blkid Followed by Enter The result is the list of block devices, each with LABEL and TYPE


0

I recommend you to: Align DOS-partitions to start at sector 64. If only one partition and no bootsector are needed, avoid the use of partition tables. No more than 62 sectors are needed for boot loaders of DOS-partition tables. From my point of view, there are no strong reasons to align a partition to 4M, only to 4K. My question is how does the ...


-1

One efi partition of at least 1MB size with grub efi installed, which points to /boot/grub of the debian or openSUSE partition.


2

You still need to resize the filesystem contained in the LV (assuming it's one of the ext filesystems): resize2fs /dev/mapper/vg_condor-lv_root If you want to resize a logical volume and its filesystem in a single operation, use fsadm: fsadm resize /dev/mapper/vg_condor-lv_root This supports the ext filesystems as well as ReiserFS and XFS.


1

It's the volume label. That's the -L flag in mkfs.ext4 or, I think, the -n in mkfs.vfat, and so on. You can change it by passing a new label to it with e2label, or by killing it entirely with dd.


1

From the above output (repeated below) the USB device does not contain a partition table. Instead the device is formatted entirely with the fat32 file system starting at 0. This means that no space was left at the start of the device for a partition table. Model: KINGSTON DataTraveler 3.0 (scsi) Disk /dev/sdc: 15,6GB Sector size (logical/physical): ...


0

since you have the 600gb empty you can mount your current HD and copy its files to the 600gb ! or you can make a new backup using dd+gzip and you will have chance to restore your hard drive without problems of loosing space. if you want to do that from your current runing os : mount your current hd (since it is an ext4 it can be mounted on ...


0

GRUB relies on configuration files that are typically written in the host OS -- Elementary OS or Mint, in your case. What's likely to happen is that, when you install Elementary OS, its version of GRUB will take over the boot process. It will probably make Elementary OS the default but detect the Mint installation and make it possible to boot it as a ...


1

In this particular scenario, you have 3 primary and 1 extended partition. If you look at the output of fdisk -l and pay attention to /dev/sda2 End and /dev/sda3 Start, you have a bit of space there. My guess is that your only option is to move data from /dev/sda3 (/boot) partition over network or with some external media (USB etc), unmount /boot, delete ...


0

Note: As a fair warning, you need to be careful when having logical volumes span across multiple disks. If one fails, you lose your entire volume group. I cannot stress this enough, there is a huge possibility of you losing your data if a drive fails or you delete a partition that's part of the volume group. You need to create a partition on both disks for ...


1

It is a bug in the documentation. When using the command line you cannot leave the "Partition name" portion blank. Also, the "parted: invalid token: mkpart" is because of the Warning: The existing disk label on /dev/xvdf will be destroyed and all data on this disk will be lost. Do you want to continue? Yes/No? Since mkpart is not Yes or No you get the ...


1

These are logical volumes, so you can resize them using lvresize. However, that is just the resizing of the underlying block device, you still have to resize the filesystem on top of it, and the way to do this will depend on the filesystem type and its initial configuration. Most commonly used Linux filesystems support online resizing, ext2-based use ...


0

Modern disks have tracks of varying length (near the border tracks are longer). They also cache data extensively (they have quite capable CPUS and memory, some hacker even installed a Linux system on one). They also remap bad blocks (inevitable given the data density) transparently to spare blocks. As a result, data alignment issues that used to be critical ...


2

Alignment is important on partitions containing data, in order to maximise the chance that block operations will match whatever the underlying block structure is (4K on modern hard drives, more than that on flash-based drives). Extended partitions don't contain data, they're simply containers for logical partitions. The only operation which is done on ...


0

sudo chown -R your_name:your_name /media/"name_of_USB" sudo chmod -R 666 /media/"<name_of_USB>" you can use pmount ("policy mount") is a wrapper around the standard mount program which permits normal users to mount removable devices without a matching /etc/fstab entry.


1

All applications ran by normal user need extra permission to access /dev/* (that is owned by root, and other users need to be added to groups, like You said, to be able to manipulate files there according to group permissions) To answer Your question mkfs is utility for formatting from commandline, for example mkfs.exfat (with arguments) to allow users to ...


0

To change the UUID of the LUKS volume, use cryptsetup luksUUID --uuid=<the new UUID> /dev/sda1.


3

For changing the file system UUID you have to decrypt /dev/sda1 and then run tune2fs on the decrypted device mapper device. sda1 itself does not have a UUID thus it cannot be changed. The LUKS volume within sda1 does have a UUID (which is of limited use because you probably cannot use it for mounting), though. It can be changed with cryptsetup luksUUID ...


0

The solution is to use mkdosfs (mkfs.vfat) : it lets the user specify the volume label using the -n flag, and lowercase letters are kept lowercase, but this tool recreates the filesystem, so all data will be lost. The non-destructive solution below is a combination of the mlabel and dosfslabel command-line tools. Connect the device to the computer if ...


0

Fixing this should be possible, and it roughly resembles Arch Linux installation process (disclaimer: I might be mistaken about some steps, please comment if you're in trouble). First of all, boot with your live CD/DVD/USB. Then, mount your partition (everything as root!): mkdir /mnt/ubuntu mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/ubuntu Then, backup all you might need from ...


1

Well, hex 804 is actually two bytes, typically written as 0x0804. The first byte is 0x08 (the "major" number), the second is 0x04 (the "minor" number). Converting them to decimal, that's where 8, 4 comes from. You can find out what the 8 means from /proc/devices, which gives block device 8 as sd, which is SCSI disk. It's the first one in there, which is how ...



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