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A logical partition is different from LVM which stands for logical volume manager. First clarifying what logical partition is, they are simply partitions within an Extended partition, which is just like a Primary partition except you can sub-partition it and fill it with infinite logical partitions. As you may have noticed, PC hard disks only allowed 4 (...


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As I knew, Linux can only create three kinds of partitions. they are primary, extended, and logical No, that's wrong. What you're describing here is PC old-style “MBR” partitions. This was the standard partition type on PC-type computers (and some others) since the 1980s but these days it's being replaced by GUID partitions. Logical vs primary partition is ...


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If you are not sure whether you need the lvm physical partition or not , then just create the standard partition. The lvm physical volume (pv) is just a standard partition (with lvm meta data) to be used in lvm volume group (vg) from which a logical volume (lv) can be created , and the final logical volume is just like a block device where you can write a ...


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Resizing partitions into the free space after them works pretty well with gparted. Of course you should have a backup for safety, especially when you're not experienced with the procedure. As far as I remember, gparted offers to resize the filesystem after you've resized the partition, that would be the easiest way. If it doesn't, "resize2fs" is the command ...


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The savest way is to make a new partion and add it to the / or /home mountpoint.


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If you create a "logical" partition then the tool will automatically create an extended partition for it and this will be reflected in the screen display after you create the logical partition. This won't work if you've already created 4 primary partitions because the extended partition needs one of those slots, but as long as you've only created 1->3 ...


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The MBR partition format is three decades old, and subject to weirdness for historical reasons. Back then, the computer needed to know the geometry of the hard disk. How is data organized on a hard disk? In three dimensions: cylinder, heads and sectors. (Diagram by LionKimbro) The geometry was stored with maximum values that were large enough for the ...


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You are writing to the block device (dsk) which is buffered. Should you want to bypass the buffer, you might directly write to the raw device (rdsk, see What are character special and block special files in a unix system? ) by running: dd if=/text of=/dev/rdsk/c5t6d0s0 Your /text file would probably need to have a size exactly multiple of a block size for ...


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You can only create partitions with a size that is a number of sectors of the disc, and as your output shows fdisk ask for a sector number (or allows you to use a unit that is a multiple of the sector size.


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The default action of resize2fs is to grow the filesystem to occupy the whole partition, so you just need to run resize2fs /dev/sda4. Indeed, this is what I think most people do to shrink a filesystem: shrink the FS to some size that lies between the minimum size (defined by the volume of files already in the filesystem) and the desired size resize the ...


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"Has no partition table but either has partitions..." makes no sense. You can't have partitions on a device or image file without some kind of partition table. I'm going to assume you mean "has no partitions currently known by the kernel". Use kpartx. It will use losetup if and when required (e.g. when you give it an image file rather than a device).


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Since you have LVM set up, just use that — you can either extend an existing LV (and the filesystem it hosts), or create a new LV. See lvextend(8) and lvcreate(8) for details.


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A partition name is a name given in the GPT; it's external to the partition itself. A partition label is a label stored inside the filesystem; for example with ext-family filesystems, this is the label you can manipulate with e2label. You can then use filesystem labels or partition names to mount the filesystems, which helps avoid issues with disk name ...


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Use the command line: $ sudo rm /boot/.Trash-1000/* would empty all the files from the trash. The 1000 refers to your UID so may differ. It will begin with .Trash- though. There are two directories within this one - one called files where your deleted files reside and another called info which stores small text files containing the original filename ...


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The options correspond to the various partitioning systems supported in libparted; there's not much documentation, but looking at the source code: aix provides support for the volumes used in IBM's AIX (which introduced what we now know as LVM); amiga provides support for the Amiga's RDB partitioning scheme; bsd provides support for BSD disk labels; dvh ...


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Yes msdos is the Master Boot Record based partioning. You should either go with msdos or with gpt. You will have to go with gpt if you want more than 7 partitions (unless you want a non-standard MBR, which I don't recommend, you never know what utilities assume the msdos/windows restrictions). You also have to go with gpt if you have drives > 2Tb. If this ...


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If I understand correctly, your partitions are already filling up the new disk, but your filesystems aren't filling up the partitions. Since they're ext3 or ext4 filesystems, you can simply run resize2fs /dev/sda1 etc. as root, even while the filesystem is mounted, to grow it to the partition size.


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If gparted only has to extend the partition or filesystem into unused space (immediately following the partition), then it should be safe to let it extend the partition and/or fs. If, however, it has to MOVE any partitions around to make space for resizing, you'll have to boot with a gparted Live CD See the man page for resize2fs (which is the command-line ...


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Might be a missing "active partition" within DOS Partition Table, just ran into that with E5450 and Linux -- fire up fdisk and check/set.


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To make this permanent, you'll want to update /etc/default/grub to point to the correct swap partition. Example: Change this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/root rd.lvm.lv=oldnameVG/swapLV rhgb quiet" To this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/root rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/swapLV rhgb quiet" When that is completed, you 'll want to regenerate the grub ...


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I would like to thank jasonwryan for pushing me in the right direction. At this stage, I'm sure I'd be able to install Arch blindfolded and drunk, but without his help I would not have progressed far. How I solved my problem: I've used EaseUS Partition Master under Windows to create a partition for Arch. I've tried using parted and gdisk on the live ...


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You sound confused. /boot is a directory. It is possible to put the contents of /boot on a different partition, but /boot itself is a normal directory. It doesn't really make sense to say "/boot is a partition". It is customary to have a directory named /dev, which contains "device nodes" such as sda, sda1, and so on. These look like files, but if you open ...


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A file or directory in the filesystem need not actually correspond to anything on disk. For instance, you can have a filesystem (and its files) or part of it exist entirely in memory. But they don't have to be files at all, at least in the sense we usually use the term. Think of the filesystem and its "files" as an abstract interface. Almost all of your ...


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/boot and /var aren't necessarily on their own partition, but you can do so, on installing a *nix OS... Personnaly my /home has its own partition The data these folders really contain is located on parts of the actual hard drive, and as I guess the /dev/sda* files are just info about the actual disk partition (like its beginnig and end on the disk, its ...


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/dev does not hold any partitions. /dev is a de facto standrad place to keep all device nodes. Originally, /dev was a plain directory in the root file system (so the device nodes created survived a system reboot). Nowadays, the special virtual filesystem backed by RAM is used by most Linux distributions. There is no standard of any kind to have some ...


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The only thing resembling a partition in /dev/ is udev which is a pseudo filesystem used for dynamic device allocation which is a kernel feature to make device files flexible and easy to use. What you see in /dev/ are device files which actually refer to real devices, including hard drives (/dev/sda) and their partitions (/dev/sda1). Partitions are mounted ...



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