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In windows 8 create a desktop shortcut to: %SystemRoot%\System32\shutdown.exe -s -f -t 5 -c "System fully shutting down - Bye-bye!" And use that to shut down windows. Full system shutdown with no hibernation, you can mount the ntfs partion with no troubles now. Protip: pin a copy of the shortcut to the startbar, add another with shutdown -a if you want an ...


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That depends on how you are referring to the partitions throughout the system. Two key places are /etc/fstab and bootloader configuration. If you check these to be using UUIDs for the affected partitions (i.e. anything above sda6) it should be ok. Alternatively, you could use a different partitioner - namely one that doesn't rename the partitions unless ...


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Use parted to identify offset values. root@mysystem:~/# parted myimage.img GNU Parted 2.3 Using /root/myimage.img Welcome to GNU Parted! Type 'help' to view a list of commands. (parted) u Unit? [compact]? B (parted) print Model: (file) Disk /root/myimage.img: 8589934592B Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start ...


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As you say, simply move your /var/www to a partition and mount this partition as /var/www on every distribution. You may have permission issues if one distro runs apache under a different user/group to another, but that's a trivial fix in the apache conf file. Also, if you do install Fedora (or any other distro running SELinux) and make changes within ...


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As long as this is for the static files to save space you will be fine. If you have programs under /var/www (e.g. using WSGIScriptAlias) I suggest you separate these out to physical locations outside of /var/www on a machine by machine basis. The distributions often differ in subtle ways that need to be reflected in your programs. You will most likekly ...


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Gilles answer was great, but it wasn't detailed enough for newbies. Thus, I will attempt to describe everything in details. Scenario: You want to increase the size of your disk in VMware and you have Fedora installed. Find out the names of the partitions. You execute sudo fdisk -l and look for the section as below. You can see that /dev/sda2 is the ...


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This is not a hardware issue or a bug. The reason that it is taking so long is that it is doing a secure wipe of the entire hard disk by filling it with random data. The reason that this is being done, from a security standpoint is that it prevents attackers from being able to determine which parts of the disk actually contain your encrypted data, and ...


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The requirement to align to cylinder boundaries has been gone for a long time now. With the introduction of drives with 4k blocks and SSDs with 128k erasure blocks it has become neccessary to align to multiples of those instead. An alignment to 1MiB boundaries seems to become the new standard and is what DI uses in squeeze. Source You can use ...


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If you're new, gparted is probably your friend as it's quite user-friendly for both the above options. Use it to create three partitions on /dev/xvdc of the required size for your partioning scheme. Once installed, run it as root: gparted /dev/xvdc Make sure you create the filesystems as well as the partitions. Use ext4 for the partition filesystems - ...


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Your best bet is to hook up an external drive and use dd to clone the drive - make sure your external drive is formatted. dd will take a long time so you will need to be patient. After the disk is copied you can mount the drive and use encryptfs commands (along with your password) to access the contents. If it is critical data then you will also need ...


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If it's encrypted, and I assume that you know your own password, you can try something like rescatux or more simply gparted which will allow you to manually mount your disk. Chances are high that they share the same encryption libraries since they are all Debian-based distros. So they may offer to decrypt on mount. More distros that offer full suites of ...


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This should be doable. Once you've booted up your system using the Knoppix LiveCD you'll need to open a shell and then determine what the device ID is for the SSD device. You can use a command such as blkid or lsblk, assuming they're available on Knoppix. Once you've identified this, you can mount it: $ mount /dev/sda1 /mnt Once mounted you can ...


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None of the answers above solve the issue; in fact, the problem is related to Apache itself, not filesystem or permissions. The only thing you need to do to solve the issue is the following: <Directory "/www/mywebdirectoryinapartitioneddisk"> Require all granted </Directory> Here is a blog post in which I explain everything in-detail.


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Q#1: Interpreting output The output seems fairly straightforward. It isn't blocks (or bytes) but rather current block and bytes. . Between 1 and 1024 blocks successfully read. [xx](+yy){ Current block and number of bytes continuously read successfully up to this point. X Read failed on a block with minimum ...


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Yes, backing up, deleting, creating a larger one and restoring is an easy way to do this. Alternative to booting from LiveCD is to login as root and do this from the running system. However do not use su/sudo to change from an account that has it's home directory on the partition that is going to be backed-up and restored. If you don't want to use a ...


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You don't even need to do that. Simply log out of all users and log back in as root (root's home is /root; not within /home) Unmount the /home partition. Resize /dev/sda3 using gparted or similar. Mount /home. Run lsblk - /dev/sda3 should now be about 280GiB.


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- Editing partitions /dev/sda3 to /dev/sda2 in terminal as root - Backup partition table sfdisk -d /dev/sda > sda.bkp Copy partition table backup to the new partition table cp sda.bkp sda.new Edit new partition table gedit sda.new Save, close Reinstall the new partition table sfdisk --no-reread -f /dev/sda < sda.new Reboot computer


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I advise using the disc divided into different partitions "each corresponding to the system in use" ntfs-3g with windows and linux with ext4 "and the sector of user data in the linux system folder" home "on a separate partition or as part of a "folder" on the partition ntfs-3g windows system that could be something like this: where we would have the linux ...


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This is a critical moment of the installation, the guide doesn't want to interfere too much because: you have chosen expert you could erase data involuntarily Exposing all possible options to a GUI installer is difficult (GUI is always limiting choices). Finally some recommendations: Bootable flag for boot partion: on Other partitions, bootable flag: ...


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Run from an up-to-date Linux distribution in a POSIX shell the following should list the contents of every Windows 7+ User folder on any disk in the system. I don't know exactly where the desktop background is kept though - and I don't have a Windows installation - but hopefully the following is enough to go on. mkdir /tmp/mnt ( set $(lsblk -pno ...


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Did you extend any filesystem in logicla volume ? if yes reduce size of Filesystem (If this can be achieved) ... (remove file, use fsck -B). if no lvreduce --size 100M /dev/myvg/lvtest vgreduce myvg /dev/rdsk/myusb with obvious meaning for myvg and myusb.


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Try this: #dmraid -r -E /dev/sda If that doesn't work, try #mdadm --zero-superblock /dev/sda It is also possible to do this automatically by editing the Kickstart file to use clearpart option, see: http://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/Installation_Guide-en-US/s1-kickstart2-options.html


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1: it doesn't have to do anything with primary/extended/logical partitions. 2: I think you wanted to say "logical" partition instead of "extended". 3: mkfs thinks your partition size if 0 bytes. It was very surely, because the kernel wasn't able to update the partition table after a repartitioning. After you edited the partition table, didn't you get some ...


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I figured it out. My bootloader wasn't configured properly. Sounds obvious, right? Modifying fstab doesn't quite qualify as configuring the bootloader. I had to change a line in /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cgf to refer to correct boot partition. That said, there was no need to boot off of the second disk in the first place. I could have avoided this problem by ...


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sysctl kern.geom.debugflags=16 This solve it for me. If some one can explain for future reader how and why this work I delete my answer and accept your answer.


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ef00 appears to be the correct hex code.


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you need to move/recreate the linux swap partition and ensure that it begins/ends on a cylinder boundary


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You must run the command partprobe -s before doing any operation on /dev/sda6 If you don't have that command then simply reboot the machine


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I ran across the same issue just now, and found another workaround. Basically, it involves making the hosts /run directory available to the guest. First, we mount /run where it can be accessed by the guest. I will assume that your install partition is mounted at /mnt mkdir /mnt/hostrun mount --bind /run /mnt/hostrun Then, we chroot into the guest, and ...


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Have you tried "grub-install" from a terminal? You will need to be root or use sudo. grub-install or sudo grub-install To see which version you have you can run: grub-install --version GRUB1 is versions <= 0.98. Also on the boot loader screen, it should say if it is "GRUB" or "GRUB2".


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You can try recover some files with the program testdisk. They have a good tutorial and in some Linux distros it's already included. If yours has it not, download from here.


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You may want to try booting into a recovery disk. System Rescue CD MAY be able to recover the data. It is better to do this from a live disk because then you are less likely to overwrite the information that is there. When you delete a file it is not wiped, but instead the computer sees it as space that it can write over. As long as it has not been ...



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