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If you need the text mode to resize partitions you can try parted: https://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/5.2/Deployment_Guide/s2-disk-storage-parted-resize-part.html


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Have you tried using cfdisk? It's a command line based partition editor, and it's worked for me whenever I needed to do anything involving creating/resizing partitions.


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You need to tell the kernel that the partition table has changed after you make any changes to partition tables with fdisk, cfdisk, or parted etc. There are two main ways of doing this: Reboot. The kernel will detect the new partition table and use it automatically. run partprobe as root. This will tell the kernel to scan the block-device partitions and ...


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I can put an example where align to cylinders is needed, but i don know why on the hell i really need that align? What i want: Boot an UEFI system with Grub2 and SystemRescueCD.iso loop. Boot medium: USB strick, i have two usb sticks, 2GiB (align to MiB works) and 8GiB (align to MiB fail on physical machine but works on VirtualBOX, at physical PC boot time ...


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Actually, you need to download the USB ISO file. Else, you can burn your current DVD ISO on a DVD and proceed to install.


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Restore You can restore the image back to your replacement HDD with something along the lines of: # dd if=backup.img of=/dev/sd? You will end up with a clone of your original disk including all partitions and data. The downside to this is that the partitions won't be resized by dd so your replacement disk must be identical to or larger in capacity than ...


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Try configuring /dev/disk-by-id etc, to the /dev/sda or /dev/sdb according to the disk your system is installed, i know the first notation is better but sometimes it is broken here, i made a little distro for the company and having this problem in some random dimensions...


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When working with LVM (Logical Volume Manager) you should bare in mind that the order of operation is imperative. If you do not follow the order you risk losing your data. If you already have a PV(Physical Volume) and a VG(Volume Group) it is easier to extend the volume group by adding additional devices. To extend the volume group e.g vg1 you can do the ...


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gparted uses resize2fs to change the partition's size. It doesn't take many arguments. Below are the ones I've found useful. -M shrinks to the file system's minimum size. -p shows a percentage indicator. -P prints the file system's minimum size and exits.


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This appears to be a bug in older versions of LVM. A bug that could be corrected by compiling from source with a different set of flags to add support for thin devices. I can not speak for the SystemRescueCD you mentioned, because I have never used it, but it may be using an older version of LVM, for whatever reason, which may have this very bug. Since ...


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You can do all this with GParted. The 1.5TB partition you want to keep and extend is inside an extended partition (which makes it a logical partition), so using standard tools you won't be able to turn it into sda1 — the "container" extended partition will end up being sda1 and your useful partition will be sda2. (You can turn a logical partition into a ...


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Note that latest git version (will be released as 2.2) of KDE Partition Manager can do those steps. It still needs more testing, but so far it seems to work.


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I don't think most of the partition management programs for Linux will move a partition unless there is no overlap, and you can't do that because the ~90.8G extended partition (sda2) will not fit inside the ~11.7G free space. (You can't just move swap, sda5, because of how extended partitions work). Please read and understand the whole thing before ...


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You have a huge list Devansh. but here is what is understood. Which Linux Distro you want to install. You need at least 100 GB of partition per Linux Distro system its totally depends on your package selection. If you leave space unattended in the disk management then it can be detected by the Linux OS while installation. you don't need to create a file ...


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This configuration works but it's a bit messed up. The output of parted shows that you have just 2 usable partitions: 1 1049kB 256MB 255MB primary ext2 boot This is the boot partition. 2 257MB 107GB 107GB extended 5 257MB 107GB 107GB logical lvm This is the main (root) partition, using LVM, ...


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du is for disk usage; it is showing that you are using 100G. Rather than du, use df -h; it will report used and available space.


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du shows occupied space. To show the total, use df.


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You can use gparted, but there is a chance to lose data .So make a backup before.


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Does your hard disk have an EFI partition? I've seen this error, even when setting the bios to legacy mode, if there is no EFI partition. A simple way of checking is to download a recent ubuntu, install it and inspect the partition table. You should then be able to install pardus over the top of ubuntu, but don't allow it to delete the EFI partition ...


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You are not booted in EFI-mode. Can you disable Secure Boot -- it could be falling back to "Legacy" mode in the absence of a correctly signed kernel image and bootloader. And if you have already disabled Secure Boot, this means that you motherboard do not allow UEFI. The reason why this step is vital is that Legacy boot use MBR and UEFI mostly use ESP. So, ...



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