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Partition layout is a different level than the one on which the files with user (or system) data live. Partition schemes divide a block device, usually a hard drive, into several regions, which operating system kernel can use to support file systems, which in turn are used for hosting files. When you resize a partition that already holds some file system, ...


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Why can I rest assured that GNU Parted has not corrupted a single bit after shrinking my partition? You can't, in fact, gparted man page clearly says (under NOTES): Editing partitions has the potential to cause LOSS of DATA. ...... You are advised to BACKUP your DATA before using the gparted application. Reboot your system after resizing the ...


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There are several utilities that function in a similar way that you can use for this: md5sum, sha1sum ... sha512sum: On your current partition: find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum > /var/tmp/checksum.lst and then in the directory of your backup: < /var/tmp/checksum.lst md5sum -c You can replace md5sum with any of the other commands. ...


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What is changed is the partition table. None of the files in the partitions are changed. Traditionally the partition table is stored in the MBR (Master Boot Record). Alternatively you may have a GPT (GUID partition table).


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Your drive is formatted using extended and logical partitions. The MBR partition table format allows only 4 primary partitions, so /dev/sda1 - /dev/sda4 are reserved for primary and extended partitions. If you want more than 4 partitions, then you have to use logical partitions within an extended partition. In your case: /dev/sda1 is a primary partition ...


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The partition table is changed, this stores the start and end block number of the partitions. This table is not in the partition, and therefore not in the file-system. Various block addresses are changed within the file-system (this is part of the file-system meta-data). This is part of the mapping from directory entries to physical locations. None of this ...


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Your disk is usually structured using a partition table like this: A partitions usually contains a file system, which in turn contains all your files and directories. If you shrink a partition you first have to shrink the file system to cover less space of the partition, afterwards you can shrink the partition. The details of shrinking a file system ...



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