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4

A BIOS boot partition doesn't contain a filesystem; it's just a place to put some GRUB code that on an MBR disk would've been located immediately after the boot sector, before the start of the first partition. On a GPT disk, that area is used by the (larger) partition table and isn't available for bootloader code, so the bootloader code goes in a small ...


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If you are using mkfs.ext4, you have to pass -E root_owner=your_uid:your_gid, this is usually passed in an 'extra options' textbox in gui partition tools. If you dont do this (< mkfs 1.42) then the person running the gui tool will get the permissions. Nowdays, for security, it assigns them to root:root (0:0). If you ever go back to fat32 or ntfs, you ...


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You might be able to re-detect it without reboot, by unloading / re-loading the correct module (or just un-binding and re-binding the driver). For example: [ 978.527221] sd 11:0:0:1: [sdk] Attached SCSI removable disk #~> echo 11:0:0:1 > /sys/bus/scsi/drivers/sd/unbind #~> echo 11:0:0:1 > /sys/bus/scsi/drivers/sd/bind [ 5572.027119] sd ...


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Here comes a memo to resize an NTFS partition using commandline with ntfsresize (from the ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs package) and fdisk, that should work for Windows XP-to-8 versions. Note that GParted does all the following for MBR/DOS as well as for EFI/GPT drives if ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs is installed. My references are at the end. OK in this scenario I have a ...


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The file listing of /etc/mtab appears to belong to /etc/alternatives! Is there any way you could have accidentally renamed /etc/alternatives to /etc/mtab? Is /etc/alternatives missing? If so, then the fix is just to rename /etc/mtab back to /etc/alternatives. If not, then you are stuck with the problem of merging the contents of the real /etc/alternatives ...


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Had the same problem: Disk that is about to die, with NTFS partition that I wanted to rescue first and fix after (before the disk is totally gone). Was able to resolve it with ntfsclone: Connect the two disks - old and new Boot with Live-Linux from USB (can use Parted Magic for that as well) Create a big-enough partition on the new disk (use gparted for ...



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