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There is no generic way to directly mount a subtree of a filesystem. But you can mount the whole filesystem somewhere, and then “copy” a subtree of the mount with a bind mount. mount /dev/foobar /media/foobar mount --bind /media/foobar/usr /usr In fstab syntax: /dev/foobar /media/foobar auto defaults 0 2 /media/foobar/usr /usr bind bind


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I resized the partition to a too small value have corrupted the fs? It's unlikely in your case, especially since you were kind enough to stop that fs(c)killer, but you can't rule out the possibility entirely. For example, corruption happens when it's a logical partition inside the extended partition of a msdos partition table. Logical partitions are ...


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As we discussed the issue was that fdisk does not create a filesystem, it only creates partitions. To create a FAT32 filesystem on raspbian you need to install dosfstools and then use mkfs.vfat as follows: mkfs.vfat -F 32 <device> In this specific case mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/mmcblk0p3 After this the device is mountable. Note: FAT32 has no uid/...


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Mounted file systems can't be resized. In the screenshot of gparted, there's a key symbol between /dev/sda2 and ext4; that key symbol indicates /dev/sda2 is mounted. It can't be unmounted while the Arch Linux system on sda2 is running. To fix: Reboot from a liveCD, (or USB equivalent), and run gparted from that, right click on /dev/sda2 and click '...


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I resolved the issue by removing that partition's entry from /etc/fstab For reference: none of the actions I took were damaging to the empty partition, it was the fact that I deleted a partition which was listed in /etc/fstab I apologize for bad formatting in the question. I typed out the question on my phone's browser.


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use mount's -L option or specify the mount device with LABEL=name. e.g. mount LABEL=MasiWeek /media/masi/MasiWeek or mount -L MasiWeek /media/masi/MasiWeek mount also has a -U option and understands UUID=uuid if you prefer to use the block device's UUID. The easiest way to get a list of all block devices, along with the LABEL and/or UUID details (if ...


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If you only know the partition label and want to find the corresponding kernel name: lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}' outputs something like sdb3. You can then mount the partition the same way your file manager does, via udisksctl: udisksctl mount -b /dev/$(lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}')



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