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You may want to try booting into a recovery disk. System Rescue CD MAY be able to recover the data. It is better to do this from a live disk because then you are less likely to overwrite the information that is there. When you delete a file it is not wiped, but instead the computer sees it as space that it can write over. As long as it has not been ...


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I ran across the same issue just now, and found another workaround. Basically, it involves making the hosts /run directory available to the guest. First, we mount /run where it can be accessed by the guest. I will assume that your install partition is mounted at /mnt mkdir /mnt/hostrun mount --bind /run /mnt/hostrun Then, we chroot into the guest, and ...


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1: it doesn't have to do anything with primary/extended/logical partitions. 2: I think you wanted to say "logical" partition instead of "extended". 3: mkfs thinks your partition size if 0 bytes. It was very surely, because the kernel wasn't able to update the partition table after a repartitioning. After you edited the partition table, didn't you get some ...


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I figured it out. My bootloader wasn't configured properly. Sounds obvious, right? Modifying fstab doesn't quite qualify as configuring the bootloader. I had to change a line in /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cgf to refer to correct boot partition. That said, there was no need to boot off of the second disk in the first place. I could have avoided this problem by ...


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You can try recover some files with the program testdisk. They have a good tutorial and in some Linux distros it's already included. If yours has it not, download from here.


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See here mount info for current directory This question answers how to find mount info for file-system for current working directory. So if you can cd to somewhere in the mount, then you can find out with (cd $somewhereInTheMount; until findmnt . ; do cd .. ; done)



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