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6

You can use: mount for a list of all mounted filesystems and mount options for each of them; lsblk for a tree of block devices, size and mount point (if mounted); df for a list of mounted block devices, size, used space, available space and mount point.


6

Another approach is with findmnt: findmnt /dev/sda4 ...to get mountpoint from dev. Or vice-versa: findmnt /home


3

Depends on what you're after. If you want to check which of the partitions in /dev/sd* has a default mountpoint and what that mountpoint is, you could do for part in /dev/sd*; do grep -w "$part" /etc/fstab | awk '{print $1,$2}; done However, on most modern systems, partitions are mounted by UUID and not dev name, so a better approach1 would be: for uuid ...


3

You're actually asking two questions. The easiest thing to do if you want to know where your home is: cd df -h . Or df -h $HOME Where is /tmp mounted? df -h /tmp ...etc. If you want to know what is mounted on a certain device, mount | grep ^/dev/sda1 (for example). Or mount | grep ^/dev/sd to see all the sd's.


2

You can use mount command. It also shows options with which the mounting is done.


2

You're looking for the df command.


2

I'm a fan of LVM but I don't think it is required in this case - if all you want to do is to expand your sda1 filesystem to use the rest of the space on this drive. Assuming you don't at the moment have any data on your sda3, a better strategy is: with fdisk it is hard to work out the actual sizes of the partitions, use swapon -s to show the size of your ...


1

First, you can't extend /dev/sda1 to include /dev/sda3 as their space allocations are NOT contiguous. You'd have to dump everything, re-layout the partitioning, and restore. Second, /dev/sda1 does not to appear to be an LVM partition. Even if you wanted to add the apparently unclaimed physical volume created in /dev/sda3, this would not be possible. ...



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