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There is no generic way to directly mount a subtree of a filesystem. But you can mount the whole filesystem somewhere, and then “copy” a subtree of the mount with a bind mount. mount /dev/foobar /media/foobar mount --bind /media/foobar/usr /usr In fstab syntax: /dev/foobar /media/foobar auto defaults 0 2 /media/foobar/usr /usr bind bind


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The dd command copied exactly 512 bytes as requested. Your main source of confusion comes from the fact that /dev/sda has a logical sector size of 512 bytes while /dev/sdb sectors are 1024 bytes. The partitions otherwise appear identical. The MBR in no way affects the size used by files on the partitions either. The fact that it doesn't boot is probably ...


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The easiest way (at least for me as a Linux user) would be to start up Linux from a live CD/DVD and use gparted to partition the USB drive, then install the three distros into the three partitions. You need to install GRUB such that it recognizes the three OS installs and lists them in the boot menu, this is a bit tricky and probably beyond the scope for ...


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You want to look into GRUB (http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html#Introduction). Grub can boot particular partitions on a disk, and is how most dual boot windows/Linux machines are managed. It can also allow you to boot as many linux distros as you have installed onto partitions. The easiest method (if your hardware supports it) would be to try ...


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Resizing partitions into the free space after them works pretty well with gparted. Of course you should have a backup for safety, especially when you're not experienced with the procedure. As far as I remember, gparted offers to resize the filesystem after you've resized the partition, that would be the easiest way. If it doesn't, "resize2fs" is the command ...


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If you create a "logical" partition then the tool will automatically create an extended partition for it and this will be reflected in the screen display after you create the logical partition. This won't work if you've already created 4 primary partitions because the extended partition needs one of those slots, but as long as you've only created 1->3 ...


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I resized the partition to a too small value have corrupted the fs? It's unlikely in your case, especially since you were kind enough to stop that fs(c)killer, but you can't rule out the possibility entirely. For example, corruption happens when it's a logical partition inside the extended partition of a msdos partition table. Logical partitions are ...


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I resolved the issue by removing that partition's entry from /etc/fstab For reference: none of the actions I took were damaging to the empty partition, it was the fact that I deleted a partition which was listed in /etc/fstab I apologize for bad formatting in the question. I typed out the question on my phone's browser.


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If you only know the partition label and want to find the corresponding kernel name: lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}' outputs something like sdb3. You can then mount the partition the same way your file manager does, via udisksctl: udisksctl mount -b /dev/$(lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}')


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You are trying to use a sector that is not available to use. First sector (218613758-250068991, default 218613758): 218611712 Change 218611712 to 218613758 ... Not really sure why it is not. If the sda2 the extended is empty try to delete it also and recreate it. There seems to be empty space between sda1 and sda2. It could be that sector does not ...


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Command usermod fails if the said user has process(es) running under the same username, regardless what you are trying to modify in this account. You either have to kill all processes owned by this user (in a corporate environment, I need to warn you , NOT to do that) or just edit the /etc/passwd file and change whatever you need and the next time the user ...


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Bootable usb thumb drive with 2 partitions. Windows and others may only see the first partition on a usb device even when there are multiple partitions. Therefore make your first primary partition the fat32 or NTFS partition so windows can see and use it. partition 1 - ntfs or vfat partition 2 - ext4 The second partition is where you will store the ...


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For the specific purpose of using grub-reboot, I found out that I can mount the Xubuntu partition from BunsenLabs and do grub-reboot --boot-directory=/media/.../boot ENTRY and it works.


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As I knew, Linux can only create three kinds of partitions. they are primary, extended, and logical No, that's wrong. What you're describing here is PC old-style “MBR” partitions. This was the standard partition type on PC-type computers (and some others) since the 1980s but these days it's being replaced by GUID partitions. Logical vs primary partition is ...



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