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5

If you can increase the capacity depends on whether you have LVM installed or not and whether your filesystem supports growing (ext{2,3,4}, btrfs, reiserfs, xfsm, and maybe some others, do) If you do have LVM you can add the new disc add it to the current /home (or if that is not a separate partition /) using vgextend and lvextend. If you don't have LVM, ...


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Use parted instead, possibly coupled with your filesystem's resizing command. parted is the engine underneath the GParted GUI. You can use it in either interactive command mode or directly from the command line. Before parted 3.0, the following command does what you are probably expecting, having learned about GParted: $ sudo parted /dev/sdb resize 1 1 ...


3

You are mistaken that it doesn't, you just have to tell grub-install to write it there. Once you have done that you can chain-boot-load from that boot sector. The main reason not to write in the partition by default on a new setup is that your BIOS will not find it there, you would still need some bootloader in the bootsector of the disc that gets booted. ...


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You cannot resize the partition because the free space is not adjacent to it. You would have to move /dev/sdb7 to the end of the disk first (it may take very long) and then you can resize /dev/sdb9.


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This is an address limit i.e. a number of bits. Thus this refers to real gigabytes (GiB) i.e. 2^37 bytes == 128 GiB == 131,072 MiB == 137438 MB.


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After trying hundreds of different command line combinations I found a tutorial (originally targetting other problem) with gparted livecd. I booted it, then in terminal: testdisk Chose the first option, then chose: write It allowed me to mount the disk and recover the folder I needed.


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You need to add a label to the partition. To do this, either use a filesystem specific tool, such as e2label for ext2/3/4 or use gparted. For example: #e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Do NOT mount the partition on a mount point (such as /home/Schijf-2) as it will then be part of that directory tree in your file manager and consequently will not show up. The ...


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Mount point name doesn't matter (in the pic below sda2 labelled as "Schijf-2" is mounted under /media/whatever). You'll have to label your partition (assuming sda2 is your partition): e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Edit: garrethTheRed's answer did ring a bell... Actually, the entry in /etc/fstab is irrelevant, whether you use UUID, LABEL or even /dev/sda2 it ...


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Writing 512 bytes is not enough, you need to clean out at least two 512 byte blocks. If you start with a pristine disc: # dd if=/dev/sdb bs=512 count=80000 | od -c 0000000 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 * 234200000 80000+0 records in 80000+0 records out 40960000 bytes (41 MB) copied, 0.99129 s, 41.3 MB/s Then start parted ...


1

loop isn't a partition table - you haven't got one of those on a whole disk filesystem. Whatever you are using that's showing you loop maybe doing this because it can't find a partition table. Apparently parted on a LVM setup does this. If these drives are not the ones you use to boot then there is no issue with installing a filesystem on the whole drive ...


1

If you have parted 3.2, then you can use its resizepart command to enlarge the partition. Otherwise, you need to print the existing partition table after setting it to use sectors with unit s. In your case the partition almost certainly starts on sector 2048. Delete the partition with the rm command, then recreate it with mkpart, make sure it starts on ...


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I assume it's a normal partition (PC BIOS or GPT). You really should make a backup of the partition table (e.g. with sfdisk -d /dev/sda or parted /dev/sda "unit s" print) You have to make sure that there is free space behind the partition. If you don't have a tool which allows to extend a partition directly then you have to delete the partition and ...


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Problem solved. I had to run resize_reiserfs /dev/sda4


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I do the same and because I rebuild my tool drive (added/removed/updated tools/ISOs) quite often, I'm using (http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/YUMI (Your Universal Multiboot Integrator)) It allows you to add/remove various distro's and tools to a usb flash drive. It's rather easy. The result will look something like this on boot: No ...



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