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4

The same tools that you can use for other files (generally) can also be used on block devices. This means that you can use, for example, xxd or hexdump to inspect the filesystem: $ sudo xxd /dev/sda2 | head -10 00000000: eb58 9053 5953 4c49 4e55 5800 0200 0000 .X.SYSLINUX..... 00000010: 0000 0000 0000 0000 3f00 ff00 0008 2000 ........?..... . 00000020: ...


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Your partition table looks OK, but it's a bit odd. In particular, most partitioning tools put a data structure known as an Extended Boot Record (EBR) in the sector immediately preceding the logical partition it describes. In your case, though, there's no gap between your logical partitions 5 and 6, so your partition 6's EBR must be located somewhere else. ...


3

The "DOS mode" that the man page is referring to is a mode that keeps partitions aligned on cylinder boundaries, which have been an anachronism since the late 90's. In other words, it defaults to letting partitions start and end on any sector. The DOS disklabel, otherwise known as MBR, is the conventional PC partition table, as opposed to GPT, which is ...


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That is a mess of partitions you have going on. I would just start over and do a custom partitioning job and don't let YaST make any suggestions. At that point, it'll leave your 2TB alone. Then you should be able to resize your SSD and install.


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(I know this is an old question, I came across this problem myself and got my FS back to life without ddrescue, so I'll share the expericence for anyone else encountering this) Ext filesystems store backups of the superblock -- for an occasion just like this one. First, determine the locations of the backups: mke2fs -n /dev/sdxx This is a test run (i.e. ...


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Download gparted LIVECD iso from here From your VM Choose the iso file and boot as live CD Once tha gparted Live Cd runs you can use gparted now Choose the partition to resize and choose the new size and then apply When end reboot and be sure to remove the iso file attached to the VM CD ROM, and boot to your Ubuntu.


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From Ubuntu (in VM) Install gparted by executing sudo apt-get install gparted in Terminal. Open gparted either from terminal or from dash. Then extend you disk, maybe you may have to move your extended partition at the end of disk.


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To online resize the filesystem, especially /, you need to have some form of abstraction between the physical and virtual layer, e.g. LVM. To live resize with LVM use: pvcreate /dev/sdX vgcreate vg1 /dev/sdX lvcreate Root -L10G Then next time the disk is about to be full, you will use lvextend /dev/mapper/vg1-Root -L+10G --resizefs and voilĂ  you got ...


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The kernel will use the old (cached) partition table until you unmount all partitions on the affected disk. Since you can't do it with the / partition, the option you have is to reboot. Next time try to use LVM.


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For the benefits and some additional information of partitioning, check out: http://askubuntu.com/questions/516353/what-are-the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-mounting-various-directories-on-sep



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