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4

The physical volume (PV) is simply the partition with LVM metadata added. You can't create the volume group (VG) without referring to the metadata, thus you have to first create the PV(s) that will be members of the VG. A physical extent (PE) is just that - the actual section of the disk that you're writing to, very similar to an old-style disk CHS ...


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You have four primary partitions and want to add a fifth... and you can't just redeclare them extended/logical because those need an extra sector for each partition. Also GPT has a backup at the end of the disk so if you ever lost a partition table to MSDOS and had to resort to TestDisk, with GPT you might be able to do without. grub on BIOS system with ...


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As the volume/partition that you wish to modify is mounted, you should not modify it. In fact, GParted will not let you modify mounted partitions: Why are some menu items disabled? The partition is mounted and modifying a mounted partition is DANGEROUS. Just unmount the partition… To use GParted on the boot volume, you'll need to stop/finish ...


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The three block devices are logical volumes in an LVM volume group, fedora. swap is used for swap (spill-over for RAM), home is used to store all your personal data, and root is used for everything else (programs, system configuration, system logs...). There are good reasons for these three devices to be separate: swap works better as a separate block ...


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You can access the disk image and its individual partitions via the loopback feature. You have already discovered that some disk utilities will operate (reasonably) happily on disk images. However, mkfs is not one of them (but strangely mount is). Here is output from fdisk -lu binary.img: Disk binary.img: 400 MiB, 419430400 bytes, 819200 sectors Units: ...


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You are running your disk usage via LVM, the Logical Volume Manager. Almost the entire disk is given over to LVM. Your "partitions" for / and /home are allocated out of the LVM space. You can see the usage with the pvdisplay, vgdisplay and lvdisplay commands (run these as root). If you want a new logical "partition" for your CentOS system you create one ...


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You need to create a filesystem on the new partition still. You created the partition, but it doesn't have a filesystem on it (as shown by its lack of entry in df -T). Do mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda4 then try to mount it after


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MTPFS is a filesystem, not a partition. Your computer makes requests like “give me the file at this location”, not “give me the content of this block”. How the files are stored on the other side is not visible through MTP; it could be a gnome typing replies very very fast. If you want to make a backup of what you can see over MTP, just back up the files. ...


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Your partition table claims that the size of the disk is only 0.7 tb despite the fact that it is really 2.7 and has a partition using that much space. Use gdisk to create a new, empty partition table, then recreate those two partitions with the exact same start and end sectors and type codes, and that should fix it.


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Answer: none of the above. But the question is ill-posed because: /dev is usually not a partition. In most modern Linux distributions, it's a virtual in-memory filesystem (tmpfs) managed by udev so that it dynamically reflects the devices that are actually present in the system. But you can have a Linux system with a static /dev directory and that ...


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It is not something I would do online but I think it is possible. I guess you are using ext4. umount /home $ umount /home shrink the /home filesystem $ fsck -f /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home $ resize2fs /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home 80G shrink the /home logical volume $ lvreduce -L -40G /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home resize the /home partition to the size of ...


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You cannot resize or change at all any partition on a storage device that is currently mounted. That means that your system needs to be shutdown if you intend to modify the root partition (since you cannot unmount it) You will need to boot in an external OS (e.g. using a live-CD) to perform these tasks. I would recommend you to backup any sensible data ...


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To enable the swap device you can swapon /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 If there is an error with that swap space, because it was destroyed somehow, you can reformat the swap device with mkswap /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 Check the related manual pages swapon(1) and mkswap(1) for more information.


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There is another way to do this in general, use kpartx (not kde related) sudo kpartx -a binary.img and now you should have all partition devices defined under /dev/mapper as loop0p1, loop0p2, ... and then sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/loop0p1 Optionnaly, when you are done, you can run also sudo kpartx -d binary.img to get rid of the loop0p? deivce


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I happened to find the answer on serverfault in which we can modify image/sda-pt.parted in image folder produced by cloning before the iso file is made to overcome this problem. The sda-pt.parted file contains the following: Model: ATA ST31000524AS (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 976562500s ... where the value in the second line can be converted to the size of the ...


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I don't know why it looks for binary.img1 (… and later for binary.img2 buried in the commentary.) That is because the tools are expecting the filenames to follow a specific pattern. That pattern is the one used by device files for actual discs and disc volumes on your system, namely: A device file encompassing the whole disc is named sda (or ...



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