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The command du will show you the disk space used by your files and directory. du -sh /home/* will show you the size of each subdirectory directly below the /home directory, afterwards depending on your preferences you might then: Either run the same command against one of these directories to manually step one level lower (for instance du -sh ...


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Your home folder contains two directories you own, /home/sougata and /home/sougatapc. The 182 GB you look for are these subdirectories plus possibly in an hidden one. To display hidden directories, use ls -la /home. On the other hand, unless you had a file system corruption and some files and directories were recovered with fsck, your lost+found directory ...


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fdisk -l shows that your new partition already occupies all 20GB of space, so all you need to do is resize the filesystem itself. There are various ways of doing this depending on the filesystem you're using; if you have fsadm installed, you can use that: fsadm resize /dev/vda1 (this will work for ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems as well as ReiserFS and XFS). ...


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Firstly, you have your /dev/sdX numbers mixed up between your screenshot and your summary. Hence, the four partitions from df are /dev/sda4 mounted on / /dev/sda2 mounted on /boot /dev/sda1 mounted on /boot/efi /dev/sda3 mounted on /home /dev/sda1 is not empty; df shows it contains 191M. Type: Microsoft basic in the partition table ...


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You can't swap sdaX for sdaY, which wouldn't do anything in Windows anyway. Your problem is a Windows problem, not a Linux problem: use the disk manager thingy in Windows to set a letter drive to the NTFS partition.


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resize2fs is a tool used to resize the filesystem, not the underlying block device. Before you can use resize2fs, you need to ensure that the underlying device (/dev/sda7 in this case) has more space available to use. In normal usage, the filesystem is sized correctly for its underlying device; thus, usually, you need to grow the block device before you can ...


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You can observe in /sys the block device for a given partition name. Eg for /dev/sda1: $ ls -l /sys/class/block/sda1 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root /sys/class/block/sda1 -> \ ../../devices/pci0000:00/.../ata1/host0/target0:0:0/0:0:0:0/block/sda/sda1 A script to take arg /dev/sda1 and print /dev/sda is: part=$1 part=${part#/dev/} disk=$(readlink ...


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Why this has happened I am no expert but from what I understand I think this issue is caused by a mistakenly placed bootflag. Whenever you are installing a linux OS for dual booting you want to make sure the bootloader is installed on dev/sda (i installed it on dev/sda5 which is probably why i got the grub rescue error) To fix this (it worked, at least ...


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You could swap the first partition entry in the partition table with the second one using the dd tool. I advice though that you make a backup of your files (or filesystems) before trying this procedure! I also won't claim a high degree of reliability afterwards because it is not common practice to have partition entries in descending order. Note for ...


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df shows the free disk space on mounted partitions. If you give it a device name, it will try to find the corresponding mounted partition, and show you that; that's why df /dev/sda9 works on your system. But since /dev/sda1 isn't mounted, it finds the "closest" mounted filesystem, which is /dev, an 10MB RAM-based filesystem in your case. To find out the ...


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Okay, if I get you right dd is what you need (comes with OS X). You can create bootable USB with the following command: dd if=/path/to/your/ubuntu.iso of=/dev/xxx bs=4M (Make sure you saved all necessary data from USB) Replace xxx in /dev/xxx with your USB device. You can list devices with diskutil list command to find out which one is your USB. After ...


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The absolutely easiest way I found using Linux was the following: 1) Partition the drive (I used GParted) in 2 partitions with the SECOND partition being large enough to hold your operating system. My drive was a 2gb Flash Drive so I created a 500Mb Partition 1 and the remainder as Partition2. 2) I installed the latest version of UNetbootin on my Linux ...



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