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4

Both UUID of GPT partitions, and UUID of filesystems, are generated randomly when the partition/filesystem is created. You can check that they're version 4 UUIDs.


4

This was asked recently but it was in the context of local disks. In that situation, there is a good reason to use a partition table on the disk even if you only intend to make it a single big partition spanning the entire disk: documenting the fact that the disk is actually in use, thus preventing accidents. I believe that the situation is different for ...


3

An uuid is just formatted (hyphens at specific places) random bytes so there's nothing magical about it. By glancing at the source, which you can get with apt-get source libuuid1 if you're on a Ubuntu based distro, the uuid generation either uses truly random bytes (known to be rather slow -- you can get those by reading from the /dev/random special file) ...


3

Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


3

This scheme is certainly workable. You are right, the best solution is to transform your current layout as little as it is possible. If you don't ask Arch Linux to install his Grub bootloader, you'll have to run grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg in Ubuntu (if you have os-prober installed, it will find your Arch installation and update all the config ...


2

This bug is noted here: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/parted/+bug/1270203 As noted in the thread, there are two work arounds. The simplest is to simply append "Yes" to the command list: parted --script /dev/sda unit B resizepart 2 1166016512B Yes


2

At present in my Ubuntu 15.04 UUID version 4 is used for partitions. Version 4 UUIDs use a scheme relying only on random numbers. xxxxxxxx-xxxx-4xxx-yxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx here 4 denotes the version number x is any hexadecimal digit y is one of 8, 9, A, or B Random UUID probability of duplicates Out of a total of 128 bits, two bits indicate an RFC 4122 ...


2

UUID of a partition which generated in Linux distribution is version 4. The version 4 UUID is meant for generating UUIDs from truly-random or pseudo-random numbers. It is described in RFC 4122 .


2

It's correct in principle but you might consider reducing it to a single parted call. parted --script /device \ mklabel gpt \ mkpart primary 1MiB 100MiB \ mkpart primary 100MiB 200MiB \ ... Your alignment issue is probably because you use MB instead of MiB. You should not need an actual align-check command when creating partitions on MiB ...


2

If you partition the drive /dev/sda you will get as result two partitions, not drives /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 To partition it now you will need a lot of details. Will be better to back your data and start with new installation. And in the process of install select manual disk partitioning and split the disk


2

You can easily partition it into /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 with fdisk, parted, gparted, or another partitioning tool (if you're working from a live CD) or via Anaconda (if you're in the Anaconda installer).


2

The entries in /dev/mapper are LVM logical volumes. You can think of these as Linux's native partition type. Linux can also use other partition types, such as PC (MBR or GPT) partitions. Your disk is divided in MBR partitions, one of which (/dev/sda2) is an LVM physical volume. The LVM physical volume is the single constituent of the volume group ...


1

I don't see in your post that you have tried creating a new partition in the available space - via Fedora's installer. You may want to try that.


1

You still need to format the logical volume with some kind of filesystem. LVM just gets you to the point where you have one resizable volume instead of two fixed size volumes. Example: # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vol_grp1/logical_vol1 After that, try your mount command again.


1

rsync -avz /dev/sda1 user@ip:/backup/ would attempt to copy the device node, not the disk content. You can make an image of the partition as a remote file: ssh -C user@ip:/backup/sda1.img </dev/sda1 This makes an image of the partition. It won't give you access to your files. In order to access your files, you need to mount the partition or the image: ...


1

You can do dd if=/dev/sda of=back.sda bs=10M You can increase or reduce the bs(block size) based on your i/o capacity(fast increase,slow decrease),then copy the back.sda with scp or rsync on backup. Later you can mount the image and recovery the files,this will work if sda is not broken disk,if is corrupted you can try a fsck. Rsync works for files,i ...


1

Compressibility of a disk image depends a lot on what kind of data is stored in there, how much of it is used or has ever been used (without being explicitely erased during the whole life of that drive). In short, it's impossible to tell. 77% is completely plausible as are 0% (a disk full of videos/oggs) and 99% (an empty, recently erased with zeros disk). ...


1

you are quite lucky, because the second partition is a logical volume manager lvm partition for which it is easier to reduce, extend, add and delete logical partitions as described here. Basically you have to follow the steps described in the answer here, which does extend the logical volume. Instead of extending you would shrink/reduce it. Checkout the ...


1

If you don't want to fiddle with dd, gdisk can do: $ sudo gdisk /dev/sdb GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.8 Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: present Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT. Command (? for help): ? b back up GPT data to a file <snip> w write table to disk and exit x extra ...


1

It's not a performance problem, it's a troubleshooting and fixing things problem. /boot is the bootstrap location - in there is a few files that start off everything else in your system. And sometimes you need to poke in there to fix a problem (such as grub config or similar). If you have to do this, it's useful to have a lowest common denominators sort of ...


1

there are two 2Tb hard disks in RAID. Is there any way I can format them to one single partition on both drives and mount them to lets say /media/attachment For the purposes of this answer I am using /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. It is your responsibility to ensure that this matches your situation. You can do this provided you are happy to erase all the data ...


1

Does your disk partitioning tools recognise lvm? If they do Calada gives the right advice. I did a couple tests and file and fdisk on debian both do the right thing, but test the tools you use. $ sudo file -s /dev/sd* /dev/sda: DOS/MBR boot sector /dev/sda1: Linux rev 1.0 ext2 filesystem data, UUID=censored, volume name "boot" /dev/sda2: LVM2 PV (Linux ...


1

While dual booting is a useful concept to allow you to use both Windows and Linux on the same machine, the benefits of dual booting Linux are more subtle. The boot process in Linux typically involves using a boot loader to load a kernel and ram disk which eventually mounts the root file system and lets you do things. Different distros have different kernels, ...



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