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8

There is a solution using partprobe from parted software. More information here: http://www.gnu.org/software/parted/ After using your fdisk command and having done your modifications, do a partprobe or partprobe /dev/sdx and it should inform the kernel of the change without reboot.


3

Moving pacman is not the right approach. You do, however, have a couple of options. All of them assume that you already have a full and tested backup of your data. First, make sure that you have cleared all available space in pacman's cache with pacman -Sc: pass the second c for everything. There is a pacman tool for more fine-grained control fo this, see ...


3

Normal Minix file system partitions can be further divided into up to four subpartitions. According to the install guide, the installer will take the partition you specified earlier and subpartition it into root, /usr, and /home; it's asking you how large you want /home to be. A comparable Ubuntu example would be if you selected "Specify partitions ...


3

The current version of the Anaconda installer in the Centos 6.5 repository is 13.21.215-1. By checking out that source code, we can see that the installer has sanity checks for the storage configuration (starting at 1008 of storage/__init__.py). Part of those sanity checks assert that the following directories must be on the root filesystem and thus cannot ...


3

It always annoys how CentOS/RHEL, by default, on a large hard disk, create a fairly small / partition and a really huge /home partition. This is why, when install CentOS, I always manually partition, and never use LVM (which, I have heard, also reduces performance). LVM makes sense when you want to stream a partition across multiple hard disks, but not as ...


2

Volume Groups have their uses; they keep PV separate, so things don't mix where they shouldn't be mixed. For example adding an external disk to your internal VG may be a bad idea since LVM does not particularly like missing disks. You could just as well argue that a single partition or single filesystem was enough. Why use several LV when one is enough to ...


2

LUKS has a distinct header, you could find possible offsets with grep: # grep -a -b --only-matching 'LUKS' /dev/sda5 1832480940:LUKS 1959072314:LUKS 2019974297:LUKS For each possible offset you find, you could create a loop device and see if it's a valid LUKS device or not: # losetup --find --show --offset 1832480940 --read-only /dev/sda5 /dev/loop3 # ...


2

No it will not move the entire extended partition nor make the space contigious. Although in theory the extended partition could just be recreated with the same logical partitions, that would mean that the entries stay in place (with some zero size first, logical partition), or you would have to rearange the Extended partition information. Both that would ...


1

When you see weird kernel behavior, dmesg is a great first thing to check. In your case, it gave an important pointer: 4 ofpart partitions found on MTD device spi32766.0 Creating 4 MTD partitions on "spi32766.0": 0x000000000000-0x000000500000 : "boot" 0x000000500000-0x000000520000 : "bootenv" 0x000000520000-0x0000006402c0 : "image" mtd: ...


1

Since physical and logical volumes can't span different volume groups, the volume group becomes important when you want to take if offline or move it between different systems. The volume group is another way of subdividing and managing resources.


1

I did this same thing myself the other night while debugging gparted. I used dd if=/dev/zero count=1 of=/dev/sdc to wipe out the dos partition table, then pvcreate --uuid xxxx --norestorefile to reinitialize the lvm header, and finally vcfgrestore to restore from the backup in /etc/lvm/backup, which you can also look at to find what the uuid of the drive ...



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