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6

You will first need to reconstruct the partition table the way it was. This will not affect the contents of any partition, just the system's idea of where each partition begins and ends. It sounds like you might have already done this because you seem to have a partition that exists that is "unknown", but exactly the same size as the partition was before. ...


4

No! /dev/sda contains: a small /dev/sda1 which is needed to boot. a extended partition /dev/sda2 The extended partition contains a logical partition /dev/sda5. The logical partition contains a LVM setup, broken down into to two logical volumes: /dev/mapper/server--vg-swap_1 which is your swap space /dev/mapper/server--vg-root which is your root (/) ...


3

You may want to try booting into a recovery disk. System Rescue CD MAY be able to recover the data. It is better to do this from a live disk because then you are less likely to overwrite the information that is there. When you delete a file it is not wiped, but instead the computer sees it as space that it can write over. As long as it has not been ...


2

I don't think the installer can do what you want yet (although it's getting better over time), so you could try booting the installation image, and run a root shell from the initial menu. You can then use gpart, zpool and zfs to configure your disks by hand and install the system from the archives on the image. There are numerous guides around the Internet, ...


2

Add the shared volume to your /etc/fstab file so it mounts automatically at boot. Then run the following commands: mount -a ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Music /home/My_Music ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Videos /home/My_Videos ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Documents /home/My_Documents Navigating should be pretty ...


2

The offset is specified in 512-byte sectors. Your alternative offset of 63 comes from the C/H/S geometry, which is obsolete and should be ignored. Offset 64 sounds better than 63. It's clearly more even - it provides alignment to 512*64 = 32KiB. You definitely want to aim for 4KiB alignment. (Even if you weren't using an SSD - hard drives are now based ...


2

Like UVV wrote in a comment, this shouldn't present a problem. Do it from single user mode if you want to play it safe. Create a partition to hold the new /home, create a file system on it, and mount that file system. Move everything under /home into the root of the file system on the new partition. mv /home/* /mnt/ or something like that should do nicely. ...


2

Modern disks these days usually contain a number of spare sectors that are automatically put into service should a problem in one sector is found. If you run out of these spare sectors, then you are looking at a disk that is in pretty bad shape. Instead of attempting to zero out the bad blocks and continuing, I'd get a new disk and install it. It's far ...


2

I ran across the same issue just now, and found another workaround. Basically, it involves making the hosts /run directory available to the guest. First, we mount /run where it can be accessed by the guest. I will assume that your install partition is mounted at /mnt mkdir /mnt/hostrun mount --bind /run /mnt/hostrun Then, we chroot into the guest, and ...


2

The first step is to create a partition. There's no entry in /dev for the free space because it's free space, not a partition. You can use fdisk to create a partition. Run fdisk /dev/sda, then enter the n command and create a partition covering the free space. Once you're satisfied with the new partition table, enter the command w to write it to disk. You ...


1

I figured it out. My bootloader wasn't configured properly. Sounds obvious, right? Modifying fstab doesn't quite qualify as configuring the bootloader. I had to change a line in /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cgf to refer to correct boot partition. That said, there was no need to boot off of the second disk in the first place. I could have avoided this problem by ...


1

You can try recover some files with the program testdisk. They have a good tutorial and in some Linux distros it's already included. If yours has it not, download from here.


1

See here mount info for current directory This question answers how to find mount info for file-system for current working directory. So if you can cd to somewhere in the mount, then you can find out with (cd $somewhereInTheMount; until findmnt . ; do cd .. ; done)


1

sda2 is kind of like a 'suitcase' holding all extended partitions. You can't delete it. sda5 is the only partition in the 'suitcase', and is your LVM physical volumes. You can't delete it. To actually see what you have spare space wise, use these commands: df -h : Shows the free space on all your volumes (you might be able to reclaim some space) vgs : ...


1

From man fstab: Instead of giving the device explicitly, one may indicate the (ext2 or xfs) filesystem that is to be mounted by its UUID or volume label (cf. e2label(8) or xfs_admin(8)), writing LABEL= or UUID=, e.g., 'LABEL=Boot' or 'UUID=3e6be9de-8139-11d1-9106- a43f08d823a6'. This will make the system more robust: adding or removing a ...


1

You can't do fdisk because you're already at twice MBR's maximum with a 4TB device at 512b sectors. You need to format it with GPT. From wikipedia: The organization of the partition table in the MBR limits the maximum addressable storage space of a disk to 2 TB (232 × 512 bytes). Get the gdisk package and reformat the disk (though it seems to me it ...


1

If you access the disk using a filemanager then the partition is mounted in: /run/media/<username>/<label or uuid> Only the user which used the filemanager has permissions to this partition. To make the partition visible to others, you'll need to add it to /etc/fstab. For example: /dev/sdb1 /media/mystuff ext4 defaults 1 2 ...


1

If you have space, please back up the disk as a whole (e.g. dd if=/dev/sdb of=disk.img bs=1M), before running random programs like fsck on things that you don't think are valid partitions :p. I'm not saying you've damaged it, but there's a very good chance of doing so while experimenting. The partition table shown by parted & the kernel looks ...


1

This is related to the file system you intend to use. Some of them, such as EXT4 or ReiserFS, allow to mark bad sectors: see the -c option of e2fsck or the -B option of reiserfsck. I think this works on other file systems as well. If you choose this way you should partition and format the hard disk with bad blocks control enabled, and proceed with the ...


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I haven't used the new installer yet but I have used mfsbsd with 9.x, doing exactly what you describe. There is an option to the zfsinstall on mfsbsd: -z zfs_part_size : create zfs parition of this size (default: all space left) mfsbsd is really simple and fast to use.


1

The debconf question partman-partitioning/default_label should set the partition table type. You also need to set the boolean question partman-partitioning/confirm_write_new_label to true or partman will not overrite an existing partition table. So you should put in your pressed file : d-i partman-partitioning/default_label select msdos d-i ...



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