Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Assume partition as just the rooms in the newly constructed house. It just doesn't have any layout or anything till now. All you have done is constructed new rooms in the house. Now, you need to have the rooms designed for specific purposes (for example, the kitchen has to have more storage shelves, the living room has to have more space to accommodate TV ...


3

By default, a linux filesystem reserves 5% of the space for root (the user) usage and maintenance. If the device was 100% full, you couldn't even create the temporary files necessary to allow a user to log in... like perhaps.... root! Total space: 395.00G (from your example) minus 5%: 19.75G (reserved space) ============ ======= User space: ...


3

You split your disk into (at least) two partitions - one for your home directories (/home) and another for everything else (/). It looks like you only allocated about 10GB for /, which is now full. The partition mounted as your /home directory is ~621GB, with plenty of free space, but that's not where most system files go. That's the danger of allocating ...


2

376 / 395 =~ 0.95. So you are missing approximately 5% of your disk. That sounds like the default value of disk space reserved by the system for system logs etc. You can find out by running tunefs -l which will show you what your reserved blocks percentage is. You can then retune your file system using tunefs -m See the man page for tunefs for more ...


2

The /home partition is useful if, for example, at one point you want to reinstall Arch or install another distribution, because thus you will save your personal settings, browser history, etc.


2

Of course the primary goal is not to have the need to use swap in the first place... The main thing is to create the swap LVM volume when the system is still quite fresh, the same as when you create a swap file, as swap space performs best when it is contiguous. You don't want to actual disk blocks that make up the logical volume to be fragmented all over ...


2

If you're absolutely sure that the end of the last partition fits on the target drive, you can copy the drive wholesale. Don't use dd, which is slower (unless used with additional options, and not always even then) and more error-prone; simply use cat. cat /dev/sdc >/dev/sdz Replace /dev/sdz by the proper path to the drive that you want to overwrite. ...


2

I suggest you read this guide on Ask Ubuntu. As for the difference, gparted and similar tools help you partition your hard drive. The Ubuntu installer can also do this automatically which is, presumably, the way suggested by the sites you read. I would not do that though and especially not with a system that has windowd8 installed since there are other ...


2

Your files are in the sda3 partition, so changing fstab by itself won't move the files. You could (among several alternatives) mkdir /home.new mount /dev/sda4 /home.new cp -a /home/user /home.new umount /home.new rf -fr /home mv /home.new /home mount /dev/sda4 /home then edit fstab to include /home /dev/sda4


1

Assuming that you're using legacy PC partitions (UEFI and other partition schemes have no notion of “primary partition” vs “logical partition”), the partition type can be determined from the number. Partitions numbered 1 through 4 are primary or extended. An extended partition is one that acts as a container for logical partitions, it cannot contain ...


1

Hard drives usually don't have labels, it's filesystems that do. Here are the main places where a filesystem label is likely to come up: In /etc/fstab. In your bootloader configuration (e.g. /boot/grub/grub.cfg). If your Grub configuration is automatically generated, run update-grub after changing your labels and verify that the result is what you wanted. ...


1

As far as I know, labels aren't that much used in the unix world, so there isn't any danger in changing them. Keep using the UUIDs and you should be fine.


1

You can use dd to create copies of the partitions and not of all the device. dd if=/dev/sad1 of=/tmp/boot.img dd if=/dev/sad2 of=/tmp/root.img As for Q2b: I did this several times, never had a problem, but still this is not recommended.


1

I'm not really sure that this is a correct place to ask such questions. But I assume that your partition numbering has changed when you created another partition for Linux therefore you'd need to change windows bootloader configuration. The link provided says: Immediately Reboot Windows After Shrinking Partition After shrinking the Windows ...


1

Confirm that you've created a full restore disk. It could be simply a repair/boot disk. I recently created restore disks from my laptop (and I know they works as I've used them) and they came to 3 DVDs. With a Windows full restore disk set you'll completely overwrite the HDD (wiping your Arch install), reinstating your Windows and OEM partitions. That ...


1

I think you have misunderstood something. What zimage commonly refers to is the compiled linux kernel, so this sounds like a boot partition. But that does not need to be very big at all. Looking at this, it seems that the beaglebone (and I presume the BBB) uses a (small) VFAT partition to boot from. This seems like a common ARM SOC methodology; it will ...


1

For simple copying, using rsync to copy to your backup medium, as mentioned in the comments, is sufficient. If you want versioned backups and easier control, rsnapshot is a good choice. However, for a system partition, there's often an easier option. Since most of the data comes unmodified from your distro's repositories, you can usually manage by simply ...


1

You can use fdisk to change your partition table while running.Refer this link http://codesilence.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/live-resizing-of-an-ext4-filesytem-on-linux/


1

After I shrunk the volume in Windows by a disappointing amount, the option to shrink the volume in the Fedora 20 installer became available allowing me to shrink it down by much more. Shrink the volume in Windows 1. Boot into Windows 2. Go to "Disk Management"     a. Right click "Computer" from the desktop or Start Menu ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible