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4

You may want to try booting into a recovery disk. System Rescue CD MAY be able to recover the data. It is better to do this from a live disk because then you are less likely to overwrite the information that is there. When you delete a file it is not wiped, but instead the computer sees it as space that it can write over. As long as it has not been ...


4

I figured it out. My bootloader wasn't configured properly. Sounds obvious, right? Modifying fstab doesn't quite qualify as configuring the bootloader. I had to change a line in /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cgf to refer to correct boot partition. That said, there was no need to boot off of the second disk in the first place. I could have avoided this problem by ...


3

If you're new, gparted is probably your friend as it's quite user-friendly for both the above options. Use it to create three partitions on /dev/xvdc of the required size for your partioning scheme. Once installed, run it as root: gparted /dev/xvdc Make sure you create the filesystems as well as the partitions. Use ext4 for the partition filesystems - ...


2

I ran across the same issue just now, and found another workaround. Basically, it involves making the hosts /run directory available to the guest. First, we mount /run where it can be accessed by the guest. I will assume that your install partition is mounted at /mnt mkdir /mnt/hostrun mount --bind /run /mnt/hostrun Then, we chroot into the guest, and ...


2

You don't even need to do that. Simply log out of all users and log back in as root (root's home is /root; not within /home) Unmount the /home partition. Resize /dev/sda3 using gparted or similar. Mount /home. Run lsblk - /dev/sda3 should now be about 280GiB.


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This is a critical moment of the installation, the guide doesn't want to interfere too much because: you have chosen expert you could erase data involuntarily Exposing all possible options to a GUI installer is difficult (GUI is always limiting choices). Finally some recommendations: Bootable flag for boot partion: on Other partitions, bootable flag: ...


2

You can try recover some files with the program testdisk. They have a good tutorial and in some Linux distros it's already included. If yours has it not, download from here.


1

Your best bet is to hook up an external drive and use dd to clone the drive - make sure your external drive is formatted. dd will take a long time so you will need to be patient. After the disk is copied you can mount the drive and use encryptfs commands (along with your password) to access the contents. If it is critical data then you will also need ...


1

If it's encrypted, and I assume that you know your own password, you can try something like rescatux or more simply gparted which will allow you to manually mount your disk. Chances are high that they share the same encryption libraries since they are all Debian-based distros. So they may offer to decrypt on mount. More distros that offer full suites of ...


1

This should be doable. Once you've booted up your system using the Knoppix LiveCD you'll need to open a shell and then determine what the device ID is for the SSD device. You can use a command such as blkid or lsblk, assuming they're available on Knoppix. Once you've identified this, you can mount it: $ mount /dev/sda1 /mnt Once mounted you can ...


1

Run from an up-to-date Linux distribution in a POSIX shell the following should list the contents of every Windows 7+ User folder on any disk in the system. I don't know exactly where the desktop background is kept though - and I don't have a Windows installation - but hopefully the following is enough to go on. mkdir /tmp/mnt ( set $(lsblk -pno ...


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Did you extend any filesystem in logicla volume ? if yes reduce size of Filesystem (If this can be achieved) ... (remove file, use fsck -B). if no lvreduce --size 100M /dev/myvg/lvtest vgreduce myvg /dev/rdsk/myusb with obvious meaning for myvg and myusb.


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1: it doesn't have to do anything with primary/extended/logical partitions. 2: I think you wanted to say "logical" partition instead of "extended". 3: mkfs thinks your partition size if 0 bytes. It was very surely, because the kernel wasn't able to update the partition table after a repartitioning. After you edited the partition table, didn't you get some ...


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See here mount info for current directory This question answers how to find mount info for file-system for current working directory. So if you can cd to somewhere in the mount, then you can find out with (cd $somewhereInTheMount; until findmnt . ; do cd .. ; done)


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- Editing partitions /dev/sda3 to /dev/sda2 in terminal as root - Backup partition table sfdisk -d /dev/sda > sda.bkp Copy partition table backup to the new partition table cp sda.bkp sda.new Edit new partition table gedit sda.new Save, close Reinstall the new partition table sfdisk --no-reread -f /dev/sda < sda.new Reboot computer


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This is not a hardware issue or a bug. The reason that it is taking so long is that it is doing a secure wipe of the entire hard disk by filling it with random data. The reason that this is being done, from a security standpoint is that it prevents attackers from being able to determine which parts of the disk actually contain your encrypted data, and ...



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