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11

/dev does not hold any partitions. /dev is a de facto standrad place to keep all device nodes. Originally, /dev was a plain directory in the root file system (so the device nodes created survived a system reboot). Nowadays, the special virtual filesystem backed by RAM is used by most Linux distributions. There is no standard of any kind to have some ...


5

The options correspond to the various partitioning systems supported in libparted; there's not much documentation, but looking at the source code: aix provides support for the volumes used in IBM's AIX (which introduced what we now know as LVM); amiga provides support for the Amiga's RDB partitioning scheme; bsd provides support for BSD disk labels; dvh ...


4

The MBR partition format is three decades old, and subject to weirdness for historical reasons. Back then, the computer needed to know the geometry of the hard disk. How is data organized on a hard disk? In three dimensions: cylinder, heads and sectors. (Diagram by LionKimbro) The geometry was stored with maximum values that were large enough for the ...


3

A file or directory in the filesystem need not actually correspond to anything on disk. For instance, you can have a filesystem (and its files) or part of it exist entirely in memory. But they don't have to be files at all, at least in the sense we usually use the term. Think of the filesystem and its "files" as an abstract interface. Almost all of your ...


3

Since you have LVM set up, just use that — you can either extend an existing LV (and the filesystem it hosts), or create a new LV. See lvextend(8) and lvcreate(8) for details.


3

A partition name is a name given in the GPT; it's external to the partition itself. A partition label is a label stored inside the filesystem; for example with ext-family filesystems, this is the label you can manipulate with e2label. You can then use filesystem labels or partition names to mount the filesystems, which helps avoid issues with disk name ...


3

You are confusing filesystem (organization) semantics with partition (storage) semantics. Linux filesystem hierarchy is like a single giant tree with a stem (/) , branches ( /boot, /home, /bin, /usr, /var ) and sub-branches ( /usr/bin, /var/log ...). This metaphor is equivalent of the parents, children and grandchildren. All these symbols/names ...


2

The only thing resembling a partition in /dev/ is udev which is a pseudo filesystem used for dynamic device allocation which is a kernel feature to make device files flexible and easy to use. What you see in /dev/ are device files which actually refer to real devices, including hard drives (/dev/sda) and their partitions (/dev/sda1). Partitions are mounted ...


2

In the case of MBR (and 1/2 KiB blocks) the information are stored in the first block (first 512 bytes) and for historical reasons and out of compatibility with various OSes the first really useful block would be the 63th. The space in-between is often used by boot-loaders for the program code for one of their levels. In the case of GPT you have the ...


2

Yes msdos is the Master Boot Record based partioning. You should either go with msdos or with gpt. You will have to go with gpt if you want more than 7 partitions (unless you want a non-standard MBR, which I don't recommend, you never know what utilities assume the msdos/windows restrictions). You also have to go with gpt if you have drives > 2Tb. If this ...


1

The default action of resize2fs is to grow the filesystem to occupy the whole partition, so you just need to run resize2fs /dev/sda4. Indeed, this is what I think most people do to shrink a filesystem: shrink the FS to some size that lies between the minimum size (defined by the volume of files already in the filesystem) and the desired size resize the ...


1

Use the command line: $ sudo rm /boot/.Trash-1000/* would empty all the files from the trash. The 1000 refers to your UID so may differ. It will begin with .Trash- though. There are two directories within this one - one called files where your deleted files reside and another called info which stores small text files containing the original filename ...


1

/boot and /var aren't necessarily on their own partition, but you can do so, on installing a *nix OS... Personnaly my /home has its own partition The data these folders really contain is located on parts of the actual hard drive, and as I guess the /dev/sda* files are just info about the actual disk partition (like its beginnig and end on the disk, its ...


1

If I understand correctly, your partitions are already filling up the new disk, but your filesystems aren't filling up the partitions. Since they're ext3 or ext4 filesystems, you can simply run resize2fs /dev/sda1 etc. as root, even while the filesystem is mounted, to grow it to the partition size.


1

If gparted only has to extend the partition or filesystem into unused space (immediately following the partition), then it should be safe to let it extend the partition and/or fs. If, however, it has to MOVE any partitions around to make space for resizing, you'll have to boot with a gparted Live CD See the man page for resize2fs (which is the command-line ...


1

You sound confused. /boot is a directory. It is possible to put the contents of /boot on a different partition, but /boot itself is a normal directory. It doesn't really make sense to say "/boot is a partition". It is customary to have a directory named /dev, which contains "device nodes" such as sda, sda1, and so on. These look like files, but if you open ...


1

Partitions do not contain other partitions. Every partition that you use has a mounting point. The main (root) partition, needs to be automatically mounted on / during boot, and then other partitions can be mounted in any existing location you chose. One important thing to note is that mounting a partition somewhere will hide what is already present at ...


1

If you need the text mode to resize partitions you can try parted: https://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/5.2/Deployment_Guide/s2-disk-storage-parted-resize-part.html



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