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9

You can't convert, but can reformat the partition. Boot into Ubuntu or from a live CD and format the partition from there. Be careful not to format the wrong partition. mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdx1


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If the filesystem is ext2, ext3 or ext4, then you can use the command tune2fs to find out particulars about a given filesystem on a device. $ sudo tune2fs -l <dev> Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sda2 tune2fs 1.42.8 (20-Jun-2013) Filesystem volume name: <none> Last mounted on: /boot Filesystem UUID: ...


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In order to recover this installation, I suggest: download & boot RIP Linux (11.7 is a version I prefer, although there is 13.7 available too); if you have problems booting the ISO, remember that for RIP Linux is enough to start the kernel and rootfs.cgz as initrd, making it very simple to boot even from an existing installation with gparted resize ...


2

This is going to be tricky to fix by hand. I hope you haven't modified any more data on this disk, apart from the broken partition table you wrote to it. Using sfdisk, fdisk, etc to create a backup of the partition table is a good idea (when you don't accidentally type the wrong command :) ). But for extra insurance I like to back up the boot sectors of my ...


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As this is not the root partition (/) you should be able to do this without losing data, if you login as the normal user, various files under your home directory are updated (from background email reading, surfing etc.). You don't want to lose emails that arrived between the backup and the restore). The important thing to be able to repartition being is ...


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You should build your own Debian image according to the instructions contained in this link: Debian UEFI-BIOS Compatibility I've done this before, following this exact guide. Let me know if you have any questions.


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1) What is wrong here, since syslinux is supposed to support ext2 partitions? Yes, Syslinux supports ext2 fs via Extlinux. If you are using a UEFI/EFI based system then you need a fat32 partition. For GPT only you don't need to have a fat32 partition, just go with the traditional. i.e. ext? 2) Do I have to install a MBR, isn't syslinux compatible ...


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Not having partitions is like having a partition starting at sector 0 which is aligned (unless you have something crazy like an off-by-1 offset jumper for old OS that start at sector 63, in which case you'd have the same alignment issues with partitions...). With a partition table, making a partition that starts at 0 is usually not possible since that's ...


1

If this is your objective, you can create the logical volume and specify the extents for its placement: lvcreate -l 100 -n lvol1 vg01 /dev/sdb1:900-999 In this example, you would be creating a 100-extend logical volume named 'lvol1' on 'vg01', using the physical volume 'sdb1', extents 900 through 999. In the case of existing logical volumes, if you have ...


1

You have a 1TiB hard drive with only 10GiB or so used. While it would be possible to expand this 10GiB partition up to a TiB or any size in between, an alternative solution is to add another separate partition for your home directories. For example, add a new partition (/dev/sda6) and move the contents of your /home directory to it (this will need to be ...


1

The Standard of Practice is to enter into a Linux recovery environment. Any distribution Live-CD will enable you to access your computer in a manner appropriate to resize your hard drive partitions. Resizing partitions is based on the ability to work on your drive without having the drive actually mounted. $> fdisk -l Invoking the command above will ...


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for the resize2fs bit, it's like this: e2fsck -f /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest 96M #always a bit smaller than the LV ### then the rest as above lvresize -l 100M /dev/myvg/lvtest vgreduce myvg /dev/sdX ###then regrow that to fit the volume perfectly lvresize -l 100% /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest I hope you're on ext2/3/4 . ...


1

Do you have any securelevel set? Because a securelevel inhibits EVEN the root from writing onto disks!!! It does not look to me like a broken disk, because with a broken disk you would get a storm of I/O errors over several monitor pages at least. He there just says that he can not do it because he has no permission to do that. If you are root, it might be ...



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