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The command du will show you the disk space used by your files and directory. du -sh /home/* will show you the size of each subdirectory directly below the /home directory, afterwards depending on your preferences you might then: Either run the same command against one of these directories to manually step one level lower (for instance du -sh ...


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Be sure that you run sudo update-grub immediately after you make any changes to the partition table. That is not necessary in some cases but it is always safe to do it. In your case it is better to make all changes from your new Linux installation: delete a partition and then update grub. If you are going to use Live CD instead you need to update grub ...


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I'm answering my own question because this is a bit too long for a comment. I've fixed this, but it involved wiping out all my changes and starting from scratch. I basically followed "Method 0" from this page, https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LiveUsbPendrivePersistent, which involves removing a file called casper-rw, which stores the persistent changes and is ...


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Your home folder contains two directories you own, /home/sougata and /home/sougatapc. The 182 GB you look for are these subdirectories plus possibly in an hidden one. To display hidden directories, use ls -la /home. On the other hand, unless you had a file system corruption and some files and directories were recovered with fsck, your lost+found directory ...


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fdisk -l shows that your new partition already occupies all 20GB of space, so all you need to do is resize the filesystem itself. There are various ways of doing this depending on the filesystem you're using; if you have fsadm installed, you can use that: fsadm resize /dev/vda1 (this will work for ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems as well as ReiserFS and XFS). ...


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You can't swap sdaX for sdaY, which wouldn't do anything in Windows anyway. Your problem is a Windows problem, not a Linux problem: use the disk manager thingy in Windows to set a letter drive to the NTFS partition.


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You could swap the first partition entry in the partition table with the second one using the dd tool. I advice though that you make a backup of your files (or filesystems) before trying this procedure! I also won't claim a high degree of reliability afterwards because it is not common practice to have partition entries in descending order. Note for ...


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df shows the free disk space on mounted partitions. If you give it a device name, it will try to find the corresponding mounted partition, and show you that; that's why df /dev/sda9 works on your system. But since /dev/sda1 isn't mounted, it finds the "closest" mounted filesystem, which is /dev, an 10MB RAM-based filesystem in your case. To find out the ...


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Okay, if I get you right dd is what you need (comes with OS X). You can create bootable USB with the following command: dd if=/path/to/your/ubuntu.iso of=/dev/xxx bs=4M (Make sure you saved all necessary data from USB) Replace xxx in /dev/xxx with your USB device. You can list devices with diskutil list command to find out which one is your USB. After ...


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There's no special structure so there's no harm in doing dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/yourswapdev. Just be sure you use the right device. :) (Guessing this is a VM otherwise there's no benefit to this.)


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You can do... printf 'n\n\n\n\n\nw\n' | fdisk /dev/disk ...for an msdos type. Practically the same thing works for gpt... printf 'n\n\n\n\n\nw\ny\n' | gdisk /dev/disk And you can label your disk during filesystem creation time.


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I ran into issues when I attempted to use the other answer. What worked for me wa to use the percentages approach like this instead: $ parted /dev/sdf --script -- mkpart primary 0% 100% There's an issue with parted and the way that it deals with the alignment of the partitions. These 2 articles discuss the issue a bit: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 - ...


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The absolutely easiest way I found using Linux was the following: 1) Partition the drive (I used GParted) in 2 partitions with the SECOND partition being large enough to hold your operating system. My drive was a 2gb Flash Drive so I created a 500Mb Partition 1 and the remainder as Partition2. 2) I installed the latest version of UNetbootin on my Linux ...



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