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From the Wikipedia entry: [The] maximum disk size supported on disks using 512-byte sectors (whether real or emulated) by the MBR partitioning scheme (without using non-standard methods) is limited to 2 TB. 2TB = 2*1024*1024*1024*1024 = 2^41 = 2^32 * 2^9, and 2^9 is 512.


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It turns out that I needed to run the following: sudo update-grub This updated my /boot/grub/grub.cfg file and got rid of the windows 7 option.


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You can't tell what each partition is for from /proc/partitions, that only tells you the partition numbers and their sizes. Given the numbering, with a one-sector sda3 and no partition numbered 4, this is an MBR-type partition table where sda3 is an extended partition; since Windows needs to boot from a primary partition, the Windows partition has to be ...


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If all you did was delete the partition and not reused its space, then the program testdisk should have no trouble finding and recovering the partition. Take this as an opportunity to learn the lesson that if you don't backup your important data, it will be lost sooner or later.


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From TLDP: This directory is provided so that the system administrator may temporarily mount a filesystem as needed. The content of this directory is a local issue and should not affect the manner in which any program is run This means you can simply create the /mnt directory as instructed in the other answers. Since there was nothing mounted under /mnt ...


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Yes, all you have to do is to (as root) mkdir /mnt chmod 755 /mnt The chmod is necessary to ensure that the mountpoint works correctly.


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Create /mnt as root and: chmod 755 /mnt


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The lvmcache(7) manpage describes how you can remove the cache pool without removing its origin volume: Removing a cache pool LV without removing its linked origin LV This writes back data from the cache pool to the origin LV when necessary, then removes the cache pool LV, leaving the un-cached origin LV. lvremove VG/CachePoolLV Example: ...


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You could use parted for example. It has a -s flag for use in scripts: -s, --script never prompts for user intervention The command to delete a specific partition would then look like this: parted -s /dev/sda rm /dev/sda5


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I use fdisk. If you know what questions it will ask you can put the answers in a file and use that for input to fdisk.


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You probably need to install e4fsprogs CentOS package before you want to create an ext4 filesystem. In general, mkfs is just a front-end for a series of mkfs.* binaries. See the following example: root@locutus:/home/asd# strace -f -e trace=execve mkfs -t asdasd /dev/whatever execve("/sbin/mkfs", ["mkfs", "-t", "asdasd", "/dev/whatever"], [/* 18 vars */]) ...


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NOTE: You have not to use LVM for / and /boot But DB: DB always be stored in /var such as mysql and psql, So need a big space for it. You can create the following question from yourself: Do we have syslog center? Do we have more than 10 effective user account? What's size of our memory? (for size of swap) What do we have packages? What's your hdd size? ...


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Grub's menu comes from a configuration file, not by scanning hardware. However, the configuration file can be created by scanning hardware, which you would want to do after you've changed partitions around. The command to do this is either grub-mkconfig (Debian derived) or grub2-mkconfig (Fedora derived). I presume Mint would be the former but in any ...


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GParted is often worth using because it helps avoid several nasty mistakes. I guess the main advantage of command-line tools here is to have more visibility of details. This can be useful in unexpectedly fragile situations (at least once it's broken, the details might help you realize why). However I wouldn't recommend using them to others unless they ...


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You need the ntfsresize utility from the ntfs-3g package, which can resize NTFS file system. However, be sure to backup the partition before you make any changes to it, since sometimes Windows have other ideas of what the resized partition should look like. The backup can be conveniently performed with the ntfsclone utility (same package), since that saves ...


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You could move your extended (swap space) to the end of unallocated space and then resize sda1. By moving I mean you could simply delete it, resize sda1 and then create the swap space at the end of the disk.


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dd if=/dev/mapper/storage2-crypto bs=16 count=1 2>/dev/null | od -t c -t x1 0000000 L U K S 272 276 \0 001 a e s \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 4c 55 4b 53 ba be 00 01 61 65 73 00 00 00 00 00 That's what it looks like on my system. See http://wiki.cryptsetup.googlecode.com/git/LUKS-standard/on-disk-format.pdf (page 6) The ...


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The logical partitions (like sda1, sda2) of the physical disks (like sda, sdb) are the partitions. So partitioning is the task of modifying the partition tables of these physical disks. The Folders are only mount points where you can mount the partitions. I guess because the most partitions have a specific mount point (like /home) its obvious to name the ...


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I am a user of btrfs. In the past I used it for both the root and the home partitions. Now I'm using btrfs for the root and XFS for the home partition (because of openSUSE, as you pointed out). I cannot notice any differences, except one: with XFS, I can't snapshot my home anymore. Btrfs is fairly stable nowadays, however, you should always have backups ...



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