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8

Restore You can restore the image back to your replacement HDD with something along the lines of: # dd if=backup.img of=/dev/sd? You will end up with a clone of your original disk including all partitions and data. The downside to this is that the partitions won't be resized by dd so your replacement disk must be identical to or larger in capacity than ...


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du is for disk usage; it is showing that you are using 100G. Rather than du, use df -h; it will report used and available space.


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du shows occupied space. To show the total, use df.


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I don't think most of the partition management programs for Linux will move a partition unless there is no overlap, and you can't do that because the ~90.8G extended partition (sda2) will not fit inside the ~11.7G free space. (You can't just move swap, sda5, because of how extended partitions work). Please read and understand the whole thing before ...


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When working with LVM (Logical Volume Manager) you should bare in mind that the order of operation is imperative. If you do not follow the order you risk losing your data. If you already have a PV(Physical Volume) and a VG(Volume Group) it is easier to extend the volume group by adding additional devices. To extend the volume group e.g vg1 you can do the ...


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You are confusing filesystem (organization) semantics with partition (storage) semantics. Linux filesystem hierarchy is like a single giant tree with a stem (/) , branches ( /boot, /home, /bin, /usr, /var ) and sub-branches ( /usr/bin, /var/log ...). This metaphor is equivalent of the parents, children and grandchildren. All these symbols/names ...


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Partitions do not contain other partitions. Every partition that you use has a mounting point. The main (root) partition, needs to be automatically mounted on / during boot, and then other partitions can be mounted in any existing location you chose. One important thing to note is that mounting a partition somewhere will hide what is already present at ...


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You need to tell the kernel that the partition table has changed after you make any changes to partition tables with fdisk, cfdisk, or parted etc. There are two main ways of doing this: Reboot. The kernel will detect the new partition table and use it automatically. run partprobe as root. This will tell the kernel to scan the block-device partitions and ...


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You can do all this with GParted. The 1.5TB partition you want to keep and extend is inside an extended partition (which makes it a logical partition), so using standard tools you won't be able to turn it into sda1 — the "container" extended partition will end up being sda1 and your useful partition will be sda2. (You can turn a logical partition into a ...


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This appears to be a bug in older versions of LVM. A bug that could be corrected by compiling from source with a different set of flags to add support for thin devices. I can not speak for the SystemRescueCD you mentioned, because I have never used it, but it may be using an older version of LVM, for whatever reason, which may have this very bug. Since ...


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You have a huge list Devansh. but here is what is understood. Which Linux Distro you want to install. You need at least 100 GB of partition per Linux Distro system its totally depends on your package selection. If you leave space unattended in the disk management then it can be detected by the Linux OS while installation. you don't need to create a file ...


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This configuration works but it's a bit messed up. The output of parted shows that you have just 2 usable partitions: 1 1049kB 256MB 255MB primary ext2 boot This is the boot partition. 2 257MB 107GB 107GB extended 5 257MB 107GB 107GB logical lvm This is the main (root) partition, using LVM, ...



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