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1

I recommend you read this article since it can help you much. All you need, is to do steps below: First of all, remove epel-release: yum remove epel-release Then, delete it from rm -rf /var/cache/yum/x86_64/6/epel or the 32 bit version if your system is 32 bit, and then you need to install the correct epel-release package. So download the correct epel-...


0

First you need to remove the epel-release: yum remove epel-release Remove the cached files for epel under /var/cache/yum/... Then enable EPEL Repository: RHEL 6 32-Bit wget http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm rpm -ivh epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm RHEL 6 64-Bit wget http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/...


0

As per kba's comment, it will: install development tools like compiler, linker, make and such as referenced in this Stack Overflow answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/37528215/4957508 The answer there says: Please note that Solus is not based on Ubuntu, rather, it is built from scratch. Thus Ubuntu repos and package names are not applicable here. ...


1

Solution (taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/29201696/4684797 , as indicated by the OP, with a lot of noise removed): sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list and add these lines at the end of the file: deb http://packages.dotdeb.org wheezy-php55 all deb-src http://packages.dotdeb.org wheezy-php55 all Then do wget http://www.dotdeb.org/dotdeb.gpg sudo apt-...


0

If you are using bash: trap `echo $BASH_COMMAND | fgrep "pacman - S" >> /home/logfile You'll also want it in your .bash_profile or similar so it runs for every interactive shell. Of course, this only captures the things you typed into bash, not anything that was executed in some other way, such as a front-end running pacman in the background. ...


-1

Have a look at sudosh2 for logging of your entire command history with replay. This might do what you want.


3

I think what you are trying to accomplish is very hard if not impossible, even when you can create a wrapper function to do what you want and an alias to call the wrapper instead of the actual command it all goes wrong because you usually run sudo pacman -S and sudo breaks all functions and aliases by switching contexts. But not all is lost, you can list ...


2

You only have the updates listed. The base repo you're missing is at deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib


1

I have had this problem so many times I 'wrote it down' # tested works # jessie updates deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free deb http://mirror.cogentco.com/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free deb http://security.debian.org/ jessie/updates main contrib non-free # source list deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian jessie main ...


1

The other answer is incomplete, and not entirely correct. dpkg has a "hold" state. Essentially, this state means you do not want the system to upgrade the package in the given state, even if there is a newer version. This state can only be set manually. To figure out whether you have any packages in this state, run dpkg -l|grep ^h. If that produces any ...


3

That message indicates that apt didn't changed anything and the broken packages it tried to solve were kept in the same state. In this case "held" is used as "keep". If I had to reword it it would say: Unable to correct the problems, packages are left unchanged.


1

There are several probabilities: Your list can be not updated, use apt-get update. You should also check if apt-cache policy list all the repositories. Is probable that the package isn't available in the repository sources you have added or in another component. For Debian, use madison, other distros have equivalents. For that package for example you need: ...


2

If you want to update Python, why don't you use your distro's package manager? apt-get in the case of Debian. If you want to install a different version of python, it would be best to do that in a virtualenv. If you're installing a package you're building, usually it would be placed somewhere like /usr/local/bin. You'll find most of your currently ...


4

Banshee (the animal) is not the same thing as banshee (the package name). These package names are case sensitive, and Debian packages have not been allowed to use upper case letters in their names since over fifteen years. Also, the lines beginning with deb are not commands; they are URIs that should be entered into the apt configuration file for that ...


4

Perl in Debian is split into several parts. One of these parts, the perl-base package, is part of the set of "essential" packages. Debian defines these essential packages as "will always be installed on a debian system". Packages can assume they will be available, even if they do not have any form of dependency declared on them. If you remove one of them, ...


0

Let me throw a brick to attract some jade here. dnf list all | less shows all packages(including installed and available packages). The output has two sections: "Installed Packages" and "Available Packages". All "Installed Packages" are preceded by @ sign, while "Available Packages" are not. So I believe @ signs show the packages are installed. If a package ...


1

I upgraded Fedora 16 to 17, then to 19, then to 21, and I think most of the issues I hit probably would have been hit in a clean install anyway. However, each upgrade took about a full day including doing a full drive image beforehand, then following all the detailed upgrade procedures I've read which include doing things like checking for RPM packages ...


4

There is no way to verify that a binary package does what the source says it should do (it's an unsolvable problem both in theory and in practice). However, if you know how the binary package was produced, you may be able to be certain that it was the result of compiling the source code. This requires trusting: the compilation tools (not just compilers as ...


1

As I understand, upgrade step by step is most supported way. Upgrading is not only replacing old files to new, it also can contain conversion of old configuration to new (install script in rpm can do many things). This upgrade process tested for some popular upgrade scenarios and can depends on core system components (glibc binutils ...). There possible not ...


1

The "wrong architecture 'amd64'" error is because you tried to install a 64-bit ("amd64") package on a 32-bit ("i386") system. The libc6-dev-i386 package is sort of a strange one because it's built only for 64-bit systems, but it actually contains 32-bit software. It's meant to help with compiling 32-bit programs on 64-bit systems. Since you're running a ...


0

I looked into it and found this answer from another post: sudo apt-get install build-essential autoconf libtool pkg-config python-opengl python-imaging python-pyrex python-pyside.qtopengl idle-python2.7 qt4-dev-tools qt4-designer libqtgui4 libqtcore4 libqt4-xml libqt4-test libqt4-script libqt4-network libqt4-dbus python-qt4 python-qt4-gl libgle3 python-dev ...


2

I found this answer to a duplicate question on ServerFault titled: yum equivalent of “apt-get purge" that provides the only method I've seen that can do what apt-get purge <pkg> does on Ubuntu/Debian. for package in package1 package2 package3 do echo "removing config files for $package" for file in $(rpm -q --configfiles $package) do echo " ...


2

You need to (at least) remove apache2.2-bin: apt-get remove apache2.2-bin Alternatively, you can force the installation of apache2-bin: dpkg -i --force-overwrite /var/cache/apt/archives/apache2-bin_2.4.20-2_amd64.deb and then try apt-get -f install again.



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