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5

To figure out if a package (Tor here) is installed by user, run this in terminal: apt-cache show tor | grep Priority if the priority was optional‍‍‍‍‍, The package was installed by user, If was standard (important on Debian ) it's a default installed package. Now to find out when the package is installed, check the apt logs in /var/log/apt/history.log. ...


1

sudo apt-get remove libreoffice orage brasero exfalso quodlibet gimp imagemagick ristretto xsane orage is an xfce4 dependency in at least Ubuntu, therefore removing orage will also remove xfce. To avoid this, verify the packages that will be removed are the ones you intended when using apt-get remove.


0

This seems to solved the error. I opened the file /etc/default/grub and found on line 11 GRUB _ CMDLINE _ LINUX _ DEFAULT="quiet splash acpiosi=linux Removing the spaces between _ to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpiosi=linux solved the problem


0

2) You can find out which packages are installed from this particular repository with aptitude (source). aptitude search '~S ~i (!~Atesting ~Aunstable ~O"Unofficial Multimedia")'


2

You can use dpkg-deb command to manipulate Debian package archive (.deb). From manpage:- -I, --info archive [control-file-name...] Provides information about a binary package archive. If no control-file-names are specified then it will print a summary of the contents of the package as well as its control file. ...


0

Why are you trying to add an OpenSuSE repo? zypper and yum aren't compatible. If you're trying to get the stress application installed it's in EPEL so you'll have to add the EPEL repo even if you're on CentOS.


0

You know you can convert the package.* files in directories, right? Then you can organize your atoms in several files, eg, in my system I got the following (well, not really, i am not at my laptop now. But you het the idea): /etc/portage/package.keywords: package.keywords qt5.keywords xfce.keywords /etc/portage/package.use: package.use qt5.use ...


1

Yes, those files are considered configuration files. Generally, (at least) everything in /etc is considered a configuration file in Debian. That's why it takes a purge to remove them. The reason they are configured configuration files is that anything that the system administrator is reasonably expected to customize or edit should be considered a ...


0

Sounds like something went a little wrong in Fedup. Since every system which has been running for a while and has had some packages added and removed is effectively unique, this, unfortunately, happens sometimes. From your comments, you have some duplicate packages and other issues; to fix this, make sure you have the yum-utils package installed, and run ...


1

Pacman is a distro-agnostic package manager: it was originally developed for Arch Linux, but is now used by a variety of distributions, including all of the Arch derivatives and some that are not Arch-based, such as: Chakra (originally an Arch derivative, now idependent) DeLi Linux Frugalware Linux


1

Task descriptions are stored in /usr/share/tasksel/descs The format of task descriptions is explained in /usr/share/doc/tasksel/README.gz The file format is a rfc-822 style stanza, with fields named Task, Section Description (which should include an extended description), Key, Packages, Enhances, Test-, Relevance, and Parent fields. Here is an ...


0

apt-get install --no-download --reinstall --print-uris package-name


1

You will generally find each distribution prefers one package manager system. Package managers have been ported to other distributions (e.g. APT is available for RH-type distros), but using a foreign package manager may not work well with the distro.


1

You can try: yum -y install net-snmp net-snmp-utils net-snmp-libs


1

You've installed version 1.0.1j-1 of libssl1.0.0 from somewhere apt doesn't know about (hence the lack of a URL in the output of apt-cache policy). If you want to install libssl-dev, you need to either: install the version of libssl-dev matching your installed copy of libssl1.0.0, from wherever you got libssl1.0.0 downgrade libssl1.0.0 to match the ...


0

alias vi='echo "vi not allowed (Ok, ok, if you are a vi fanatic: /usr/bin/vim)"'


0

Usually (always?) vi is simply a link to vim. On my system (OpenSuSE), /bin/vi is just a symbolic link to /bin/vim. So if you just remove both of those, it should be gone. But as others have asked, why on earth would you want to do that?


3

You can test where /usr/bin/vi to lead update-alternatives --query vi Usually there is link to /usr/bin/vim.tiny To find package name you can try dpkg -S /usr/bin/vim.tiny In my system I have received vim-tiny: /usr/bin/vim.tiny So there is additional package vim-tiny.


1

It seems like you have changed lsb-release.. replace it with the original file


3

Packages have to specify all their dependencies, unless the package depended on is "Essential". https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-binary.html#s-dependencies Packages are not required to declare any dependencies they have on other packages which are marked Essential (see below), and should not do so unless they depend on a particular version of ...


0

You're using the wrong distro if you cannot accept that you'll be starting with "outdated" packages even on the first day of a new major CentOS version release, and that they'll only get older. CentOS is that way on purpose. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 — on which CentOS 7 was based — was forked from Fedora 19, which was released about 15 months prior to the ...


0

In one of the ressouce cited by Lucas Malor, I found a script called populator which seem to be near the solution. If you set the packages selection variable to the list of all your packages PKGLIST=$(dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall| cut -f1) you can then run the script and reinstall all packages but the system will probablaby have some problems. ...


-2

This worked for me: BuildRoot: /var/tmp/%{name}-buildroot



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