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yum is a high-level package manager, able to solve dependencies. This means that should cf-cli_amd64.rpm need other packages to be installed (as it happens in 95% of cases), yum will retrieve and install them without any hassle for the user.


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Finally figured it our myself. I went with trying to build the library, and discovered a couple issues with libGL. One, my libGL.so was pointing to a folder that didn't exist. Two, being on a 64 bit machine, libGL.la was referencing /usr/lib, when my libraries are in /usr/lib64. So, I changed the last line to lib64, and tried ./configure. Bam. It worked. ...


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It's a bug in the twolame packages, tracked as #777223. There's a pending upload which should go into unstable on Sunday; you'll be able to fix your system then (or five days later in stretch). In the meantime, you can revert to the previous version of libasound2-plugins (amd64 and i386), then hold them until libtwolame0 is available; that should fix your ...


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you can use rpm -qi <package name> to have all information of installed package. you can use below commands as well yum info <package name> yum list <package name> yum --showduplicates list package name


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This answer is an improved version of Zvika's answer. Since the source-code is substantially different, I believe it is better to add it as an additional answer, instead of an edit of the original one. #!/bin/sh grep -H Installed-Size: /overlay/usr/lib/opkg/info/*.control | \ sed 's,^.*/\([^/]\+\)\.control:Installed-Size: *\(.*\),\2\t\1,' The original ...


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The lists are the knowledge of what's available, so if you delete them, you won't be able to install anything - that's exactly equivalent to removing the repositories from your sources list (which you say you don't want to do). One option is that you could compress the lists, and remember to uncompress them before you next update. What I often do ...


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You can just use: rm /var/lib/apt/lists/* This will remove the package lists. No repositories will be deleted, they are configured in the config file in /etc/apt/sources.list. All that can happen is that tools like apt-cache cannot get package information unless you updated the package lists. Also apt-get install will fail with E: Unable to locate package ...


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dpkg -l | grep -e package1 -e package2 .... Will list packages you are interested with their current insstallation stauts. The output will be something like this bala@bala-laptop:~$ dpkg -l | grep apache2 ii apache2 2.4.10-10 amd64 Apache HTTP Server The first 2 characters tell the status ...


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apt-cache showpkg shows detailed information about potentially installable packages. It does indicate whether the package is installed, kind of, but not in a very readable way: Versions: 2:3.6.6-6+deb7u5 (/var/lib/apt/lists/mirrordirector.raspbian.org_raspbian_dists_wheezy_main_binary-armhf_Packages) If the package was installed, you'd see ...


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dpkg -l $PACKAGENAME is enough. The first two characters in the line will show the package status


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I know this is a bit late, but this post is currently one of the top search hits related to finding alternatives in Debian. The problem with using update-alternatives here is that it will only show you installed options as far as I can tell (its man page is pretty sparse). To answer the question as posed in the title, i.e. finding all available packages ...


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After a couple of hours Googling I found a post that suggested that the issue was with mintinstall and advised running the following:- apt-get purge mintinstall apt-get install mintinstall After running these and a reboot the Synaptic Package Manager behaved in its normal manner. The puzzling thing was that there was no suggestion that mintinstall was ...


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AFAIK you'll need to check manually if an update is available and, if you want it, manually uninstall the old version and download + install the new one. It's clearly more cumbersome a process than installing packages via apt-get, which also allows you to easily solve dependencies and do updates. However, there are a few advantages: You can compile with ...


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This Perl one-liner can be used to parse dependencies from debian-control: perl -ne 'next if /^#/; $p=(s/^Build-Depends:\s*/ / or (/^ / and $p)); s/,|\n|\([^)]+\)//mg; print if $p' < debian/control or perl -ne 'next if /^#/; $p=(s/^Depends:\s*/ / or (/^ / and $p)); s/,|\n|\([^)]+\)//mg; print if $p' < debian/control


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You need to remove the various i386 packages which are causing issues: apt-get purge devscripts:i386 gcc:i386 gcc-4.8:i386 gcc-4.9-base:i386 libgcc1:i386


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Only practical example seems to be mentioned in a puppet bugreport - "yumrepo type does not support multiple gpgkey entries" which says that you need to use multi-line URLs instead of multiple gpgkey= entries. Hence it should look like this gpgkey=<url1> <url2> and not like this gpgkey=<url1> gpgkey=<url2> This is also ...


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I had the same question, I tried sudo apt-get install python3 and it worked. $ ls /usr/bin/python* /usr/bin/python /usr/bin/python3 /usr/bin/python3m /usr/bin/python2 /usr/bin/python3.4 /usr/bin/python2.7 /usr/bin/python3.4m Hope that helps.


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The main idea is to use aptitude and its larger options. The answer follows this one on ubuntuforums. Made /etc/apt/sources.list support multiarch by adding [arch=amd64,i386] to the deb-line: deb [arch=amd64,i386] http://fr.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty universe sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-wine/ppa sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 sudo ...


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Just in case, try to reinstall each package: for i in $(cat list.log); do apt-get install --reinstall ${i} You may wish to add answer yes to all questions option too.


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In Debian and derivatives there are six types of dependencies: pre-depends depends recommends suggests build-depends build-depends-indep Each of these give corresponding reverse dependencies. To list them you can use grep-dctrl: grep-dctrl -FBuild-Depends mypackage -sPackage /var/lib/apt/lists/*Sources will list all the packages which build-depend on ...


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Fedora 12 is a bit old but I think you can still do the following: Look in /var/log/secure which has lines for each use of sudo. For example, you might find: Aug 11 15:16:37 home sudo: user : TTY=pts/2 ; PWD=/home/user ; \ USER=root ; COMMAND=/bin/rpm -i /home/user/mypackage.rpm List all the installation times of the rpms with: rpm -qa --qf '%{name} ...


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This works for me on a debian system, i'm guessing the file format has changed since 2011 . This system is pretty fresh so i wouldn't expect this to work on an older system, although that might just require unzipping the logs and using a glob to refer to all of them. grep 'install ' /var/log/dpkg.log.1 | cut -f4 -d' ' /var/log/dpkg.log has a date and ...



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