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0

OP solution and conclusions Based on previous answers here is the solution I ended up doing. 1. Copy the source code Copy your source code to the VM or other machine. I've used : scp -R /host/path/to/src/ user@remoteHost:/remote/build/path/ It's like going on a road trip, so pack well, gather all the sources that you require for compile, minus the ...


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You might want to look at Sabayon Linux, a child of Gentoo. It uses pre-compiled packages, a.k.a binaries stored in repos, that are remote. What actually happens is that maintainers configure the package using predetermined USE Flags, and then compile the package with portage. Then using the Sabayon Binary Package Manager, Entropy, the maintainers upload ...


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I would suggest not doing this. It's generally easier to build binaries for the different distros within that distro's package building process. On CentOS, that would be making use of rpmbuild. Since you're dealing with VMs it would be much more trivial to setup a CentOS 7 VM + build tools and then do the package construction there. Observations from a ...


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since your patch is tar.gz a simple way to install is to get alien sudo apt-get install alien then turn tar.gz into deb sudo alien -k file.tar.gz


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For those who don't want to install aptitude: sudo dpkg -P $(dpkg -l | awk '/^rc/ { print($2) }')


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You can set the USE-flag for VIM using this commands: sudo echo ">=app-editors/vim-7.4.273 gpm" >> /etc/portage/package.use sudo emerge -av vim or you could set the gpm flag globally in /etc/portage/make.conf and ad it in the line USE USE="gpm <a bunch of other use flags>" and after this update the system with the new USE-flag sudo ...


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Thanks to Anthony Geoghegan pointing me in the right direction, I was able to find a working solution rpm -e --justdb --nodeps libstdc++ That will remove the pacakge from the db without touching the files, then simple yum install will work.


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Out of interest, I’d first try removing the package using the rpm command: rpm -e libstdc++ However, I suspect that rpm’s internal database is corrupted and the above command won’t work so I’d then try rebuilding its database using: rpm --rebuilddb


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Other than copying the file from another instance you can also reinstall the package (via yum reinstall $package), e.g.: [root@localhost ~]# rpm -qf /bin/hostname net-tools-1.60-110.el6_2.x86_64 [root@localhost ~]# ls -l /bin/hostname ls: cannot access /bin/hostname: No such file or directory [root@localhost ~]# yum reinstall net-tools (...) Running ...


2

Sorry I just saw your question now, and I had to deal with the same issue on Apalis T30. Toradex is quite helpful if you ask them questions, but I found the solution myself in their release notes. Newer images of Toradex builds for Apalis and Colibri have an issue with the Angstrom package feeds. (V2.3 Beta1+ is my understanding). You will need to manually ...


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The following code prints the list of packages that some package in the list $package_name depends on. You can pass input from dpkg -s to use data from the list of installed packages, or from apt-cache show to use data from the list of available packages. This code skips all or-dependencies (PACKAGE1 | PACKAGE2), because determining which one to pull in ...


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No robust solution yet. https://bugs.gentoo.org/150031 La la la la la (30 characters yet?)


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There are a number of steps involved in submitting your project to be added to Debian's archives. There are two main things you need to do. Get your software into suitable shape for Debian. Debian is quite demanding about what software is allowed in its archives. This includes: a) making sure your license terms are compatible with the Debian Free ...


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Submitting packages to Debian requires you to be a Debian developer. You will find more information about this in the Debian Developer's Corner. I also came across this submission to the debian-devel mailing list, in which you may find interesting information. You may navigate through the answers by using the Next by thread links at the bottom of each ...


1

I use JuJu which basically allows to have a really tiny linux distribution (containing just the package manager) inside your $HOME/.juju directory. It allows to have your custom system inside the home directory accessible via proot and, therefore, you can install any packages without root privileges. It will run properly to all the major linux ...


0

See the options for -R (remove) in man pacman, notably -u: -u, --unneeded Removes targets that are not required by any other packages. This is mostly useful when removing a group without using the -c option, to avoid breaking any dependencies. To skip dependency checks, you add the -d option: -d, --nodeps Skips ...


3

Debian's package databases are under /var/lib/dpkg. They're text files, fairly easy to parse manually even if you don't have Debian tools around. In particular, the file /var/lib/dpkg/status contains one paragraph of information for every package (not just installed packages but also some other packages known to the system), starting with Package: ...


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It depends on how npm was configured when it was installed. If npm was installed on Debian from the package that is included in the distribution, then, yes, it is safe. npm with the global option installs to /usr/local, which is explicitly set aside for local software installation and should not conflict with the operating system distribution's own ...


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Based on yeti's solution, there is another possibility, that might be faster. Instead of computing the size with du for the files in the list file, we can use the declared size in the control file. Something like my little opkg_sizes script cd /usr/lib/opkg/info for i in `ls *.control` do echo `grep Size $i | cut -f 2 -d ":"` `echo $i | cut -f 1 -d "."` ...



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