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1

From your question I think, your problem is just a typo - the correct command is pip-3.2, not just pip3.2. EDIT: Ok then, if the typo wasn't the main bad guy, let's try something else... 1) Uninstall python3-pip sudo apt-get purge python3-pip 2) Clean everything :-) sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get autoclean sudo apt-get remove sudo apt-get autoremove ...


0

Since you're using Linux Mint, and presumably Linux Mint Debian Edition, I wouldn't do it since the next major release completely breaks with your current installation. I mean, it will be based on Debian Jessie instead of Wheezy. I also presume that you want to simply cut or copy everything manually somewhere else (like in Windows), and then relocate them ...


2

Of course, that's precisely what a 'package' is! Think of it as the install.exe on windows. You download a foo.deb or whatever file and that contains everything you need to install it. Yes, the process of installation will copy various files to various locations (that is commonly the case in Windows also by the way, not everything is in the Program ...


1

With: rpm -qlp package.rpm command you can list files inside a rpm file. Executables probably will be in some bin folder. So: rpm -qlp package.rpm | grep bin can work too.


2

As several others already have stated, look for "/bin" in the packages file list. Here's Gentoo $ equery f firefox | grep bin equery is part of the package gentoolkit.


6

The same for Debian; for an installed package, dpkg -L <packagename> | grep -F /bin/ dpkg -L lists out the package's contents (basically prints /var/lib/dpkg/info/<packagename>.list) and the grep picks out any file paths containing /bin/. For a deb file which you have not yet installed, dpkg-deb -c path/to/filename.deb | grep -F /bin/


17

I usually list out the contents of the RPM and filter it using /bin/. The files in that directory are executable. $ rpm -ql ImageMagick | grep /bin/ /usr/bin/animate /usr/bin/compare /usr/bin/composite /usr/bin/conjure /usr/bin/convert /usr/bin/display /usr/bin/identify /usr/bin/import /usr/bin/mogrify /usr/bin/montage /usr/bin/stream


2

The structure of the sources.list doesn't benefit of "minimization". There's no actual gain on compressing the lines further. All repositories listed should have the following: type [ options ] uri suite [component1] [component2] [...] or the rfc822 format Types: deb deb-src URIs: http://example.com Suites: stable testing Sections: component1 component2 ...


0

Software Center like, as GUI package manager, you can use packagekit or synaptic. They don't use many graphics effects, as USC does, but it should be a GUI equivalent of the package manager.


3

How about splitting your package into two: one part that contains the real functionality, and another part that conflicts with the packages you want to remove. Make the first package recommend the second package so that it gets installed by default, but if you later want to install something that your package conflicts with, then you can choose to remove ...


0

I think your best bet is probably to wrap a script (shell script for example) around pacman that takes care of setting things up. There's some details missing from your question, but I'm going to assume your repository is not accessible from the internet and only your local LAN but the software is licensed per user (rather than for your entire site) so you ...


0

Files located in /var are very much system-critical. For example, /var/mail or /var/spool/mail contains the users' email; you would no more delete that than you would light a fire in your neighbor's mailbox. It's only files in certain subdirectories of /var that contain files that are more or less transitory: log files in /var/log, caches that can usually be ...


0

Well I suppose you could recreate the file empty and then do apt-get install long-list, assuming you know what you installed the first time. I have an ancient script that does basically this from the smallest set of packages that can run apt-get. When using it I ended up reporting dozens of non-declared dependencies. If you don't know everything you ...


6

If you look at the purpose of /var as given in the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, it says: /var contains variable data files. This includes spool directories and files, administrative and logging data, and transient and temporary files. Note that "transient and temporary" files are just one of the things it contains. It also contains "spool directories ...


3

You can't "recreate" /var/lib/dpkg/status in the sense of just running a command and the file magically appears. No. You need to use a backup of the file, and learn never going around deleting things of the /var/lib directory: sudo cp /var/lib/dpkg/status-old /var/lib/dpkg/status This would give you the package status of the day before. Start praying it ...


3

To utilize the Debian redirector (http://http.debian.net/)... The redirector uses the geo and network location of the user and the mirrors, the architecture of the requested files, IP address family, the availability and freshness of the mirrors, and a few other things. Using main, contrib, and non-free with the redirector, /etc/apt/sources.list looks ...


4

You're missing the main Debian repositories, your sources only point to the security repo. Uncomment the last lines in /etc/apt/sources/list. Change this: # deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-updates main # deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-updates main to this: deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy main deb-src ...


0

I will answer myself. It may be useful someone. Docker used storage driver "aufs" on the old kernel. Therefore the module "aufs.ko" must be loaded. In the new kernel support aufs was not be enabled and docker began to use storage driver "devicemapper".


0

run sudo yum clean all then run sudo yum update and the system should now have all updates and software new to the server.


2

Google it. There isn't really a better way. It could be that some other software by the same name exists but no distribution has gotten around to packaging it yet. And even that isn't fully reliable: someone else could be doing the same thing right this minute and conclude that the name is available just as you do. You can check the package lists of major ...


0

apt never searches directly under pool, it only looks if referred from dists/kali/main/binary-amd64/Packages or whatever.


1

After a bit of upgrading individual packages by hand, I stumbled across a conflict with jpeg-8_5, and jpeg-turbo-1.3.0_2, running sudo pkg install -f jpeg-turbo Spat out a load of warnings. I then ran: sudo pkg upgrade And some 2 months worth of upgrades are currently installing "happily". In summary, manually upgrading individual packages turned up a ...


3

Technically, i686 is actually a 32-bit instruction set (part of the x86 family line), while x86_64 is a 64-bit instruction set (also referred to as amd64). From the sound of it, you have a 64-bit machine that has 32-bit libraries for backwards compatibility. That should be totally fine.


0

If you dig i686 in Wikipedia, Wikipedia will tell you clues that the i686 microarchitecture is considered as a x86 extension. In general all x86 architectures are considered similar, and the x86_64 (or maybe amd64) architecture is considered in another microarchitectures group.


4

While wurtel's answer answers the question as phrased, considering the background in the question reveals that this is yet another case of a XY problem. In this particular case, /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop should not be modified in the first place, but a local configuration file which overrides the default configuration should be placed in a ...


5

You want the dpkg-divert utility. dpkg-divert --divert /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop.packaged --rename /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop


0

You need to pay more attention when reading man pages - it is: rpm --install PACKAGE_FILE and rpm --query PACKAGE_NAME The packge name doesn't contain the .rpm suffix, and usually is understood to be just the name without any versioning/architecture information. When in doubt what the package name is exactly, use for example rpm -qa | grep ...


2

When querying, only supply the name of the package, not the name of the rpm file it came in: rpm -q supportScripts-0.1-1 (or just rpm -q supportScripts). EDIT: to obtain a list of the files contained in an installed package: rpm -ql supportScripts



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