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2

I used to have a "no internet" update process on my machine. This is how I did it: First I used apt-get --print-uris update > meta.list to create a list of all files needed for updating the system. Using wget, I could run wget -x -i meta.list on any other machine to download the meta data on a USB stick. Back to my machine, I generated the list of files ...


9

This sounds like it may work, but personally, I'd just use apt-offline. From the manpage: apt-offline brings offline package management functionality to Debian based system. It can be used to download packages and its dependencies to be installed later on (or required to update) a disconnected machine. Packages can be ...


2

Lintian checks the quality of your Debian package; generally speaking you can ignore its output for a simple package if you're not concerned about distributing the package. It's complaining about the ownership of the files in your package; they should be owned by root, not john (I'm guessing you're the user with uid 1000). Your control file looks fine (for a ...


1

Nowdays the changelog command within apt-get, download and display a changelog for the given package: apt-get changelog tinyproxy


1

Look at the keepcache parameter. I believe that it goes in /etc/dnf/dnf.conf and should read keepcache=1 or keepcache="true"


0

To get a list of last installed packages, you can run: cat /var/log/pacman.log | grep -i installed Example output of last installed packages: [2015-08-24 15:32] [ALPM] warning: /etc/pamac.conf installed as /etc/pamac.conf.pacnew [2015-08-24 15:32] [ALPM] installed python-packaging (15.3-1) [2015-08-24 15:32] [ALPM] installed python2-packaging (15.3-1) ...


0

I am not sure whether it applies in your case - but I use graft. It basically allows me to have a tree of installed packages in whatever place I want (e.g. $HOME/packages) and install symlinks to their files in whatever hierarchy I want (e.g under $HOME/local or /usr/local if I have root access). In effect, it helps you maintain a number of custom compiled ...


0

I just synced my potrage tree and ncurses got updated. After this sync I added =sys-devel/llvm-3.5.0 -ncurses to my packages.use since on my system llvm pulled the problematic version on ncurses in slot 5. This solved the blocks in my case. I think I can live without ncurses in llvm for now...


3

The following command will list all packages which have ever been removed (or purged), as far back as apt's history allows: zgrep -E '^(Remove:|Purge)' /var/log/apt/history.log* This does not distinguish automatic removals from explicit removals, but with a little work you should be able to reconstruct that information. If you always use the command ...


0

There should be logs located at /var/log/apt/history.log that contain your past actions with apt.


1

I don't know a way to do this using apt, but you may try searching your bash history: grep 'apt-get .*remove' ~/.bash_history This should output all lines with remove or autoremove.


1

You can do a sudo apt-get autoremove to uninstall everything that was automatically installed and is no longer needed. I guess tor-geoipdb gets removed because it depends in tor so it can't be installed without tor being installed. Now torsocks can be installed on it's own but is no longer required to being installed. So it can be automatically removed. ...


2

To uninstall a package with all its dependencies you can use --auto-remove sudo apt-get remove --auto-remove tor


5

As indicated by derobert, Debian packages which are maintained in a VCS are supposed to indicate this in a pair of Vcs-... fields in their source package. The best tool to use this information is debcheckout in the devscripts package. debcheckout -d gnome-disk-utility will show you gnome-disk-utility's repository information, and if you then want to ...


9

A lot of package include this in their control information in the Vcs-* fields. You can see it easily (and without downloading the source package) using apt-cache showsrc. $ apt-cache showsrc gnome-disk-utility ⋮ Vcs-Browser: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/pkg-utopia/gnome-disk-utility.git Vcs-Git: ...


1

You're just fetching data from Debian's database, which might be out of date or incorrect. With that caveat: You can pass the no-act flag, -s, to apt-get when fetching source like you're doing now to get the same data: $ apt-get -s source konsole Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done NOTICE: ...


0

You are not entirely right: the Debian source code is in source packages: you need some lines with deb-src in your /etc/apt/sources.list like e.g. deb-src http://ftp2.fr.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free (adapt that to your geography and habits) Then you can ask that source code to be built from source using e.g. aptitude build (and you ...


1

dpkg --search /usr/bin/mysqldump dpkg -S /usr/bin/mysqldump The argument of dpkg --search is a shell wildcard pattern, so you can do things like dpkg -S bin/*dump. Alternatively, you can search the database manually — it's just text files. grep mysqldump /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list On a system with a lot of packages installed, dpkg -S can be slow because ...


0

You could use apt-cache depends package (for dependencies) or apt-cache rdepends package (for reverse dependencies).


0

Another solution would be to run apt-cache rdepends libplrpc-perl.


5

You want dpkg. Specifically the -S option will find which package owns a file. An example: $ dpkg -S /usr/bin/whereis util-linux: /usr/bin/whereis The example shows that util-linux is the package which contains /usr/bin/whereis.


0

Assuming that you are using CentOS because of the tag I can say this: Additional packages are often in 3rd party repos. Information on additional CentOS repos is available at http://wiki.centos.org/AdditionalResources/Repositories Pay attention to the reference on yum-priorities.


0

Just remove the install-info package. After two days of "computer hell", I finally got the answer. It wasn't easy! Uninstall it from synaptic package manager, or from terminal. sudo apt-get remove install-info I recently upgraded from Xubuntu 14.04 to 14.10, then immediately to 15.04. BOTH TIMES I got the "unmet dependencies" and "held broken packages" ...


1

In the left panel, select the “Status” filter, and choose the “Installed (upgradable)” list. You can select all packages in a view by clicking the first package, scrolling to the last package and shift-clicking it. Or with the keyboard, press Home then Shift+End. Then right-click or bring up the “Package” menu and select “Unmark” or “Mark for Upgrade”. You ...


1

As stated in the comment by @steven-lu , patch is missing in the os, so his solution works perfectly: yum -y install patch


1

Regardless Kernels And Modules Package Sorting : This is tested under Mageia/Redhat etc like systems 1. Get all used licenses from all your packages. rpm -qia | grep "License" | sort 2. Find out what license does not match your needs 3. Find out what package are using the problematic license rpm -qia | grep ": Problematic License" -A 15 -B 20 ...



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