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6

Uninstalling packages in Linux may leave behind configuration files. This shouldn't be observable normal usage, unless you reinstall the same package you removed: the configuration files are usually small and not used by any other package than the ones you installed. There is usually an option in the package manager to remove configuration files when ...


16

Yes and no. *nix has a huge advantage over Windows in package management. Unlike in Windows where you must rely on third-party packages to have sane (un)installers, *nix distributions offer package managers that take care of installation and uninstallation in a unified manner. As a result, when you remove a package, all the system-level files for that ...


1

dpkg --search do not show /etc/nsswitch.conf because it is not registered as conffile so it is a bit of a special case. For example dpkg -S /etc/deluser.conf can be used to identify package that owns /etc/deluser.conf file. With path omitted dpkg --search nsswitch.conf actually show results. I also like dlocate utility which is very helpful to find which ...


1

Another option, you can download rpm file then instruct yum to do a localinstall: yum localinstall /path/to/package.rpm


7

To see what particular versions are available to you via yum you can use the --showduplicates switch. $ yum --showduplicates list httpd | expand Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, langpacks, refresh-packagekit Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile * fedora: mirror.steadfast.net * rpmfusion-free: csc.mcs.sdsmt.edu * rpmfusion-free-updates: ...


0

There is a version of Software Center in Debian 7: https://packages.debian.org/wheezy/software-center However, it does not offer commercial software. That package is not available in Debian Testing or Sid. Interestingly, the Gnome package "Software", which is the same kind of gui affair is marked as being "not in Debian" for Gnome 3.12.


1

Note to myself and others: The solution I use now is aptly. From their website: aptly is a swiss army knife for Debian repository management: it allows to mirror remote repositories, manage local package repositories, take snapshots, pull new versions of packages along with dependencies, publish snapshots as Debian repositories. So far my experiences ...


0

Aptitude is more aggressive at the time of solving dependencies, in fact it creates several recipes to solve the dependencies. What you probably did, you tried to install/remove/upgrade, aptitude detected some broken dependencies and asked you if you accept the proposed fix. You didn't noticed (pressing YYYY) but aptitude did asked you and you accepted the ...


1

You could use debmirror in debmarshal mode which seems to keep snapshots of release of packages allowing you to rollback if necessary. Seems simple enough according to the wiki. If that's too complex, mirrors normally don't delete the packages when they are updated, so using a browser you should able to redownload the packages, if necessary. Also, apt keeps ...


0

The best way to upgrade Plesk is by Plesk's autoinstaller. You can run the command /usr/local/psa/admin/sbin/autoinstaller and proceed with the installer and perform upgrade. However, before doing upgrade make sure that --> You have disabled all third party repo files under /etc/yum.repos.d --> Take the present psa, apsc data base backup ...


2

These are called reverse dependencies. apt-rdepends -r libplrpc-perl | less should do what you want. This shows the reverse dependencies of the specified package, and then the reverse dependencies of those reverse dependencies, and so on, in recursive fashion. libplrpc-perl doesn't have any reverse dependencies, so perhaps a better choice is ...


2

Why it is installed: aptitude why libplrpc-perl What depends on this package: aptitude search '~i~Dlibplrpc-perl' What would happen, if libplrpc-perl is removed: aptitude -s purge libplrpc-perl


2

Does this do what you want/need? aptitude -v --show-summary=all-packages why <package>


1

In addition to jasonwryans excellent answer: Most AUR helpers have a flag to update development packages, even if their pkgver hasn't changed in the AUR. For pacaur, that flag is called --devel which can be used in conjunction with its update operations. It will cause pacaur to rebuild development package, but only if their source is newer than that of the ...


3

Previously, VCS PKGBUILDS included a more transparent function for cloning the git repository identified in the source array, so it was a lot more obvious how they worked. Changes to the way makepkg handles these packages, documented by one of the pacman developers here, made the overall process a lot simpler. Esentially, the same thing still happens: the ...


0

Try to reconfigure your package using the following command : sudo dpkg-reconfigure zentyal-firewall


0

I don't know of a one-stop command line solution, although all the tools exist (apt-cache depends --installed, apt-cache rdepends --installed --recurse, apt-mark showmanual, dpigs, etc.). It would be possible to hack together a command line script that could attempt to find large packages with few manually installed reverse dependencies. Here's the proof of ...


1

Using conffiles is not the way to go, primarily because when your package is updated the user will be prompted whether to keep their old "config" file or to accept your new packaged version. The alternative that comes to mind is to just clean up these files in a postrm script, which will allow your package to completely and cleanly uninstall, but will not ...


0

Indirectly related info: As of today complete KDE desktop system on systemd can be compiled in pure multilib way (no emulation packages). The only problem is now proprietary nvidia-drivers package, but this can be solved by going with open-source one for now. How to starting point(other links included there): ...


0

An alternative to installing NetworkManager would be to configure the interface manually. On Fedora, you'll have to look at /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-<iface_name> Replace <iface_name> with the actual name of the interface you're trying to configure. Edit that file to specify whether that interface will be configured via DHCP or ...


3

You've accidentally removed NetworkManager during the uninstall of GNOME Desktop. Reinstall it with: sudo yum install NetworkManager and restart the Network Manager service: sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service Check that you are connected with: nmcli d which will hopefully show something similar to: DEVICE TYPE STATE ...


2

What apt-get install does is executing dpkg -i on the packages. To find out what a package does while installing you have to unpack it. Look in /var/cache/apt/archives/ if your package is still there. Inside the package is a data archive (data.tar.gz) and a control archive (control.tar.gz). Inside the control archive is a script to execute after the ...


5

You look at the post-installation script, which is actually run by dpkg. You can find these in /var/lib/dpkg/info. Such scripts contain the name of the binary package in question, and have the suffix .postinst. Note that there are also pre-installation scripts, which have the suffix .preinst, but I think that a package is much more likely to create a new ...


2

There isn't a standard mechanism to keep track of how often you run programs. If your system keeps track of file access times, you can check the last read date for programs in /usr/bin or for their data files. This can only tell you how long it is since the program was last executed, not how often it had been executed before that. ls -rtu /usr/bin | head ...


2

According to the Debian Popularity Contest README, This package contains a script, /usr/sbin/popularity-contest, which generates a list of the packages installed on your system, in order of most-recently-used to least-recently-used. The simplest way to use this information is to help clean up your hard drive by removing unused packages. ...


1

At first sight, I would say that the packages are installed. So if you don't want them anymore, just remove them apt-get remove fglrx-driver gmail-notify libgl1-fglrx-glx libgl1-fglrx-glx:i386 (Maybe with a -f flag to pass the dependency check.)


3

The Debian wiki has some more comprehensive and specific guidance than the already-mentioned Debian Policy Manual. See AccountHandlingInMaintainerScripts: The adduser program does the right thing if called with the --system option. It is thus usually only necessary to call adduser --system $USERNAME in your postinst to create the account with ...


0

Try installing CodeAnalyst with yum: yum localinstall <path to CodeAnalyst rpm>



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