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0

CentOS (assuming you are on it) does not keep separate repositories for critical and other (e.g. enhancements) updates. But do check this solution from Red Hat.


0

See details in answers above: I updated {/dev/sda3, /boot} from filesystem type=ext2 to ext4, then ran sudo dpkg-reconfigure grub-pc --frontend=text. I now see and boot to the updated kernel and have no boot-time error messages.


0

To clarify the best solution, similar to the answer Tobu gave: Do not use update-rc.d with the remove option. Instead, use update-rc.d with the disable option. Example: update-rc.d postgresql disable PLUS, You can also find (and disable) other, more specific services with systemctl. Example: systemctl disable pppd-dns.service


1

Use dpkg -L chntpw to show package contents, then look for paths in /usr/bin, /bin/ etc. e.g dpkg -L wget shows the following output, # dpkg -L wget /. /usr /usr/bin /usr/bin/wget /usr/share /usr/share/doc /usr/share/doc/wget /usr/share/doc/wget/README /usr/share/doc/wget/changelog.Debian.gz /usr/share/doc/wget/AUTHORS /usr/share/doc/wget/MAILING-LIST ...


-1

Could you elaborate on what "critical" means in your context? If you cannot do this in a manner a programme would understand there most likely is no such command to help you right away. EDIT: For critical="needs a reboot of the server" there's actually only a kernel-upgrade that forces this (which can be circumvented for HA systems to some extend using ...


0

Noting this because you mention that other distribution answers are welcome. rpm has a large set of output format tags, one of which is INSTALLTIME. (Using wget as an example) rpm -qi wget --qf "%{NAME},%{INSTALLTIME}\n" | tail -n 1 wget,1454014156 This can be formatted in a few ways. I use it in this way: rpm -qi wget --qf ...


0

Install a jail and copy the necessary files from there: cp /mnt/dataset>/jails/<jail-root>/etc/portsnap.conf /etc cp /mnt/<dataset>/jails/jail-root>/usr/sbin/portsnap /usr/sbin /usr/sbin/portsnap fetch


4

There are a few routines, old wives' tales, for finding and then cleaning out unnecessary packages, in additon to the already suggested debfoster. (first) but, why is that package installed? A tool you will want to use while cleaning out packages is aptitude why pkg-name From the aptitude man page: $ aptitude why kdepim i nautilus-data Recommends ...


3

To get a list of all the files installed by a package, you can use dpkg -L <package_name> In your case dpkg -L nginx-light will list all the files installed by the package. Look at that list to know where the executable has been installed. Also, if you know the executable's name beforehand, you can filter the list of files with grep: dpkg -L ...


0

This blog post have some details: http://sandervanderburg.blogspot.no/2014/07/managing-private-nix-packages-outside.html For more low-level from-the-ground-up details there's the nix-pill series: http://lethalman.blogspot.no/2014/07/nix-pill-1-why-you-should-give-it-try.html But I think the basic approach (disclaimer: kind of a noob myself) is to create ...


0

On Linux Mint 17 I encountered a similar sounding issue. I was zeleous in delteing files and found myself where the "Administration -> Upgrade Manager" just didn't look happy....... The solution that worked for me was to create a directory called "dpkg" as per the error message, and in it create an empty file called "status". I then ran Update Manager. ...


0

Because developers had dropped support for “likewise-open” package For more info visit enter link description here Avaibles packages enter link description here PowerBroker is the alternative of Likewise-open enter link description here


0

So you want to run a wget? This is an example pulling a rpm file and installing it. I also create a file in "/etc/firstruns/" so that it wont run every time. "creates" says: "Hey, I create this file when I'm done... so if it's already there, I don't need to do it!". You can also just specify the path in the command. The path parameter is not necessary. Feel ...


2

Speaking about Debian-derived distributions: They can differentiate multiple architectures within the same repository (including 32bit vs 64bit). The kernel modules are stored in a kernel-specific tree /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/ so you could build a package that included a module for all your possible different kernel versions and the right one would be ...


1

@terdon's answer is great but it is even easier to do this using dpkg-query which unlike apt-file is installed by default on Debian systems. ldd /bin/bash | awk '/=>/{print $(NF-1)}' | while read n; do dpkg-query -S $n; done | sed 's/^\([^:]\+\):.*$/\1/' | uniq This produces a list of packages.


-2

Check your /etc/resolv.conf and make sure you have the correct DNS.


2

Simpler oneliner: yum -q list installed packageX &>/dev/null && echo "Installed" || echo "Not installed"


0

I adress two issues in chaos answer: 1) The generated log file is not ordered because * will log files alphabeticaly (dpkg.log, dpkg.log.1, dpkg.log.2, ...) which is equivalent to from most recent to older, and inside a log file, lines are ordred from older to most recent. One solution is (thanks Toby) to use ls -rt awk '$3=="upgrade"' $(ls -rt ...


2

This won't help with your existing dev packages, but for future use, consider using mk-build-deps (in the devscripts package) to generate a meta-package for the dependencies. mk-build-deps needs just the name of an available package, or its control file. The latter is useful if your package isn't (yet) available or if you are adding new dependencies. It ...


2

This can be found in the file /var/log/dpkg.log. Use this command to generate a list: awk '$3=="upgrade"' /var/log/dpkg.log* Example output: 2015-12-30 15:33:15 upgrade firefox 38.0+build3-0ubuntu0.12.04.1 43.0+build1-0ubuntu0.12.04.1


0

You installed the package, but not its dependencies. That is something running python setup.py install will not do for you, you better try a package manager like pip in which case you don't have download pyxnat first: pip install pyxnat which will get you all dependencies specified for pyxnat, not just the requests packages. Alternatively you can do: pip ...



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