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1

I see you are quoting my answer. Can you (a) give some details on what you tried to do (b) what happened when you did it, please? Specifically, what source did you use in /etc/apt/sources.list? As the documentation on http://cran.stat.ucla.edu/bin/linux/ubuntu/ says, use deb http://<my.favorite.cran.mirror>/bin/linux/ubuntu trusty/ So ...


5

There's no general answer. Sometimes you can find more information on a dependency in a package's description; this is more often true for "Recommends:" or "Suggests:" rather than full-blown "Depends:", to help users decide whether or not to install the weak dependency. Another source of information can be a package's changelog; that will sometimes indicate ...


2

The package maintainer lists the dependencies for a package when they create the specifications file. Looking at the list of what debianutils is it seems they use it to aid in the installation of the package, but yes, you would need to dig deep to find why it is a dependency. I'll bet you could find the usage of these tools in the ./configure script of the ...


0

The problem seemed to be that the OS on my machine was the same as the live image on the thumb drive I used to install it. When I called calamares it was attempting to reinstall the entire operating system again. The reason for the disk space issue was that calamares needed root privileges. My takeaway from this is that my distro (Maui) simply isn't quite ...


1

Per FHS, /opt/bin, /opt/lib, /opt/info, /opt/include, /opt/doc, and /opt/man are there for the administrator's convenience. For instance, you might have /opt/jdk and /opt/LibreOffice holding your jdk and office suite, but rather than add a new element to $PATH, ld.so.conf, etc. every time you add another package, you can just symlink the binaries to ...


4

I don't think its possible directly. But somehow the user got your package to install—and apparently not from your repository, since it hasn't been added yet. So the first workaround I'd suggest would be to do things the normal way: have the user add the repository (or give the user a simple shell script), then install your package as normal. This would be ...


0

if you just want to install skype, do this with sudo apt-get install skype! maybe you should have read the release notes first! if you're experiencing issues with skype on a 64bit-system, also install ia32-libs: sudo apt-get install ia32-libs would do this for you.


0

/etc/services is a conffile, so if you modify it locally and a new package version is installed with a modified version, dpkg will ask you whether to keep your version or install the new one. Unfortunately, it won't give you an easy way to merge your changes. You can divert the package-provided /etc/services and provide your own. dpkg-divert --add --local ...


1

This seems to come up in various bugtrackers from time to time: Debian #46049, Debian #711001, RH #133683. But none of these seem to be implemented. To recap: the Name Service Switch reads /etc/nsswitch.conf where to look for e.g. services information: $ strace -f -e open,stat getent services > /dev/null [...] open("/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6", ...


0

Unfortunately there is no way of doing this. One option would be to "Hold" the netbase package so that it doesn't get updated automatically. echo "netbase hold" | dpkg --set-selections Another option might be to declare an /etc/services.local and submit a patch to the netbase maintainer that merged this file and its own /etc/services. I don't see that ...


0

Building on @Gaurav's answer, the easter eggs in the two package managers are quite funny!: siddhartha@siddhartha-dev:~$ apt-get moo (__) (oo) /------\/ / | || * /\---/\ ~~ ~~ ..."Have you mooed today?"... siddhartha@siddhartha-dev:~$ aptitude moo There are no Easter Eggs in this ...


1

It looks like pacaur supports --noconfirm: --noconfirm do not prompt for any confirmation The following may also be useful: --noedit do not prompt to edit files


0

Once you install a package manager and begin to use it (plus repos), lfs basically ceases to be lfs and becomes the distro using that package manager and repos. What here is your goal in using lfs? If you want special self-built packages/kernel, you may as well install arch linux and then build those packages with makepkg and/or write your own PKGBUILD for ...


2

The more you test software before releasing it, theoretically the more bug-free it is going to be. Distributions like Debian believe in heavily testing software before it's released. However, that testing takes time, hence the age. Other distributions such as Arch Linux consider that "stable" according to the upstream developer is good enough for a package ...


0

Typically RPM sets vendor through a build system configuration macro. The buildhost cannot be reset and was originally included in package metadata to help identify misconfigured build systems that caused "buggy" packages. So in RPM vendor can be overridden but buildhost cannot (but you can configure a chroot with /etc/hosts to map the IP address ...


2

First remove elementary beta PPA and replaced it with stable. sudo add-apt-repository --remove ppa:elementary-os/daily sudo add-apt-repository ppa:elementary-os/stable sudo apt-get update Now remove elementary beta packages sudo apt-get remove elementary-os-prerelease Update Linux kernel to 3.16 similar to stable release. sudo apt-get install ...


0

You may try to install your package with the following steps (if you're installing the separate .deb package, not from repositories via APT tools): Install the package itself via: dpkg -i /path/to/package.deb. It seems that you've performed that action yet. If you'll have some unmet dependencies like in your message you have, run the following: aptitude ...


1

No, there is not. You could create you own repository, like many projects do. But that alone won't help your visibility.


1

gnome-core is a meta-package and gnome-terminal is part of this package. It is no problem to remove the gnome-core-package. And in your special case, reinstall automatically installed packages: sudo apt-get install --reinstall baobab caribou caribou-antler empathy empathy-common fonts-cantarell gcalctool gdm3 gnome-backgrounds gnome-dictionary ...


3

See this ServerFault answer: after updating with apt-get, you can check for the presence of /var/run/reboot-required. You didn't mention what operating system distribution you're using, so you may want to double check that your distribution does indeed behave this way.


0

The best way to remove such unmet dependencies that you do not want to satisfy is to use: apt-get purge Purge ensures that any configuration files in relation to the package are deleted as well. In short, purge would remove anything in relation to the package--and you would be rid of the unmet dependency problem.


1

Like shibley said, this would defeat the purpose of the package manager. It would be wiser to download the source and compile it with the version of the dependency you need. Hopefully, for you, the version you want will work without any source mods.


1

Yum doesn't have a way to do this. It would counter the purpose of the package manager. Moreover, it will usually render a package dysfunctional. Package maintainer's put effort into ensuring dependencies are properly defined and not overly restrictive. That said, you can install the rpm with the rpm utility using the --nodeps flag. As a result, it ...


0

In the meanwhile I solved my problem by means of the following steps I checked the synaptic package managing tool for the installed and available versions regarding the mentioned packages I then downloaded the versions tagged with (trusty) or whenever a (trusty-updates)-version was mentioned the trusty-updates version. The command was sudo apt-get download ...


1

It's possible, although it's not a good idea to mix package management systems... An Arch package is an xz-compressed tarball containing the package's files and some meta-data, stored in .PKGINFO, .INSTALL and .MTREE. To extract a package, simply run tar xf on it in a temporary directory; if you then decide you want to install the contents you can move them ...



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