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1

You ask quite a lot of questions here. You are supposed to ask one question. However... Why most distros' package managers don't allow the same package in multiple versions In some cases they do. Eg. Debian allows different versions of Python to be installed simultaneously. In most cases they do not, because it would require extra overhead, some ...


0

Sometimes the package management system is so broken (often in a circular dependency chain) that the only combination of commands I have found to remove problematic packages are: cd /var/lib/dpkg/info ; rm <packagename.*> dpkg --purge --force-remove-reinstreq <packagename> OR dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq <packagename> Then ...


0

"AWLPhonetics3U.TTF: No such file or directory" sounds as if you're being bitten by a case-sensitive file system of UNIX - on Windows it doesn't matter whether a file ends in .TTF or .ttf, but on Linux it does. Permission errors can be because you are not the super user, or because the installation routine tries to execute some script that doesn't have the ...


0

The problem on the CentOS 6 server I was working on was that EPEL 5 was installed I found this through the following command. sudo yum repolist I solved this through the following commands: wget http://mirror.umd.edu/fedora/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm sudo yum remove epel-release sudo rpm -ivh epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm --test sudo rpm -ivh ...


0

I tried installing several Ubuntu packages on Debian Wheezy There's your problem: Ubuntu and Debian use the same package format, but you can't so easily mix Debian and Ubuntu packages on the same system, because the releases have different versions of the packages. You'd get similar issues if you mixed multiple releases of Debian or of Ubuntu. It can be ...


0

Have you tried running? apt-get clean Clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. It removes everything but the lock file from /var/cache/apt/archives/ and /var/cache/apt/archives/partial/.


0

In the end, I moved the directory with the problematic files: sudo mv /usr/share/doc/libqtwebkit4 /usr/share/doc/libqtwebkit4.backup After that apt-get -f install ran successfully.


0

Section 10.9. Permissions and owners in the Debian Policy Manual has what you are looking for (from "version 3.9.5.0, 2013-10-28"): If you need to create a new user or group for your package there are two possibilities. Firstly, you may need to make some files in the binary package be owned by this user or group, or you may need to compile the ...


1

You've upgraded the package containing the openssl frontend command, but not the package containing the OpenSSL library. That package is called libssl1.0.0, and you can upgrade it with apt-get install libssl1.0.0. Debian provides libraries in separate packages so that you can install multiple versions with incompatible binary interfaces simultaneously. For ...


1

If you care about security do not upgrade to 1.0.1; stick with 0.9.8 1.0.1 has bugs that allow the SSL key to be determined.


3

Debian validated that version of their operating system against all of the features in 1.0.1e. 1.0.1f added more features to openssl that have not been thoroughly tested in the Debian environment. 1.0.1g is the version with all of the 1.0.1f features and the bug fix for heartbleed. Instead of introducing those features and possible incompatibilities by ...


0

On Debian-based distros, you can upgrade the single offending OpenSSL package without a full apt-get upgrade: apt-get install libssl1.0.0


0

Updating an offline machine means finding a way to present the updates to that machine (this will most probably involve an external hard disk or USB stick, to move the files from online machines to the offline systems). In generic strategy terms, you have the choice between the three following solutions: Put the systems briefly online, behind some ...


3

A Debian binary package should not contain files in /opt. Per the FHS, this is for locally installed packages only. This will be flagged by lintian. Doing this will earn you an automatic reject by Debian, assuming it gets past your sponsor. No package in the official archives has files in /opt. Placing user-level executables at the top level of /usr/bin is ...


0

you have several possibilities: /opt stands for optional you can put them in a specific folder but it will not populate the PATH by default, then creating a symbolic link in /usr/bin could allow you to use them from /opt. This seems to be not a valid option if you use .deb files You can also put them in /usr/bin without bothering about anything, and do ...


2

This website tells you that the package is in the repository. You should not download the package from the website to install it. You should use your package manager : sudo apt-get install patch


3

".deb" files are not executable binaries. Use dpkg command to install your package : dpkg -i your_package.deb


1

The best way is to find what programs/services use the old libraries and restart them. And you can achieve it by listing all used files using 'lsof' and find those that have 'DEL' type. DEL means filename was removed from the filesystem but it is still stuck in memory because someone uses it. Here is the full command line: sudo lsof +c 0 | grep 'DEL.*lib' ...


1

The upstream version is 1.0.1e, which is what is being shown. What is the problem? Note the 2+deb7u5 after the dash is Debian-specific.


6

Per the Debian bug tracker, the Heartbleed issue was updated in version 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5: Marked as fixed in versions 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5. Request was from Salvatore Bonaccorso to control@bugs.debian.org. (Mon, 07 Apr 2014 21:45:14 GMT) Full text and rfc822 format available. As such, you're running the updated version and are no longer vulnerable. Source: ...


11

What was wrong in my command line? Nothing. It did what you asked it to do -- removed iptables and, by inference, everything that depends on it. And everything that depends on those things and so on. As Kiwy points out, it is pretty reckless to run a remove -y without having first considered what might happen. I'm sensing some frustration in the ...


1

Well the direct route would be to go to the PCRE website and download the package you want. http://www.pcre.org/ Or download from the SVN repo: $ svn co svn://vcs.exim.org/pcre/code/trunk pcre Since you're on SuSE you can probably go poking through the SuSE Build Service and get whatever version you need, or submit a build yourself. I found the PCRE ...


0

Downloading source code from Debian repositories is as simple as running apt-get source <PACKAGE>. It will put 3 files in your current directory, .dsc that describes package, .orig.tar.gz that contains unmodified sources, and .diff.gz that contains Debian-specific changes. But if you get error E: Unable to find a source package for <PACKAGE>, ...


2

To track the packages that are installed, updated and removed on an Ubuntu system, there is the /var/log/dpkg.log file which list all the operations done. To track the version of the kernel used at boot time, you can see this with the last command. An exemple of output of last : benoit pts/1 :0 Sat Mar 15 21:24 - 21:38 (00:13) ...


-1

I think you can do this with Tripwire.



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