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6

The direct answer is procps. Here is how you can find this out for yourself: # Install apt-file, which allows you to search # for the package containing a file sudo apt-get install apt-file # Update the package/file mapping database sudo apt-file update # Search for "top" at the end of a path apt-file search --regexp '/top$' The output of the final ...


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See this ServerFault answer: after updating with apt-get, you can check for the presence of /var/run/reboot-required. You didn't mention what operating system distribution you're using, so you may want to double check that your distribution does indeed behave this way.


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On a Debian systems file can be installed with: sudo apt-get install file


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apt-file search all repos listed in /etc/apt/sources.list and related databases, as long as repo serve a contents-%architecture%.gz. if believe the file of interest is an executable name "top", use this regex. '^/(usr/)?s?bin/top$' for the official debian repo, there is a web interface https://packages.debian.org/file:top, there are other search options.


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TL;DR: On the source machine: cat /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d >sources.list dpkg --get-selections >selections.list apt-mark auto >auto.list On the target machine: cp sources.list /etc/apt/ apt-get update /usr/lib/dpkg/methods/apt/update /var/lib/dpkg/ dpkg --set-selections <selections.list apt-get dselect-upgrade xargs ...


2

You can search for things with apt-cache search ..., although it is just a match on package names and descriptions, which sometimes is not enough. In that case using, e.g., apt-file search top might work -- it finds all packages that have a file with top in their name, but for this that is a bit zany (it includes setopt, .desktop, etc). To refine this ...


2

Plug a pendrive on the CentOS host that have internet conectivity Mount the pendrive(depends on your hardware probing). Probably: mount /dev/sdb1 /media Create a dir inside your media to keep things clean mkdir /media/rpms Use yum to download the software you want with it's dependencies. Here: yum install -y --downlaodonly --downloaddir=/media/rpms python ...


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The more you test software before releasing it, theoretically the more bug-free it is going to be. Distributions like Debian believe in heavily testing software before it's released. However, that testing takes time, hence the age. Other distributions such as Arch Linux consider that "stable" according to the upstream developer is good enough for a package ...


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It looks like pacaur supports --noconfirm: --noconfirm do not prompt for any confirmation The following may also be useful: --noedit do not prompt to edit files


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No, there is not. You could create you own repository, like many projects do. But that alone won't help your visibility.


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gnome-core is a meta-package and gnome-terminal is part of this package. It is no problem to remove the gnome-core-package. And in your special case, reinstall automatically installed packages: sudo apt-get install --reinstall baobab caribou caribou-antler empathy empathy-common fonts-cantarell gcalctool gdm3 gnome-backgrounds gnome-dictionary ...


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Like shibley said, this would defeat the purpose of the package manager. It would be wiser to download the source and compile it with the version of the dependency you need. Hopefully, for you, the version you want will work without any source mods.


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Yum doesn't have a way to do this. It would counter the purpose of the package manager. Moreover, it will usually render a package dysfunctional. Package maintainer's put effort into ensuring dependencies are properly defined and not overly restrictive. That said, you can install the rpm with the rpm utility using the --nodeps flag. As a result, it ...


1

It's possible, although it's not a good idea to mix package management systems... An Arch package is an xz-compressed tarball containing the package's files and some meta-data, stored in .PKGINFO, .INSTALL and .MTREE. To extract a package, simply run tar xf on it in a temporary directory; if you then decide you want to install the contents you can move them ...


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I know of no program to obtain this information. 1st idea Remove Kali repository. Install Synaptic Package Manager sudo apt-get install synaptic Run synaptic Klick Reload Open Installed (local or obsolete) Use Package > Force version Sometimes synaptic thinks it does not get further. Simply restart synaptic. Sometimes it is easier if other packages are ...


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From your armhf system try to ping the 64.50.236.52 ip address. ping 64.50.236.52 If you don't have any answer check your internet connection. On the other hand, if you got answer from this ip address ping the ftp server name ping ftp.us.debian.org If it doesn't answer, go to your /etc/resolv.conf file and verify it is properly set.


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There is an old script which does a really good job; it is called safepac. What does it do and how does it work? The way I usually update Arch is to read the news and then do pacman -Syu, or to just do pacman -Syu and if anything goes wrong, read the news. Now this script does nothing else: It gets the latest news entries from the RSS feed, does ...



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