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7

As you suspected, Unix-like systems prevent most files being executed from being overwritten. Here's what the standard says about the open system call: The open() function may fail if: [ETXTBSY] The file is a pure procedure (shared text) file that is being executed and oflag is O_WRONLY or O_RDWR. But a file being executed can still be unlinked, ...


7

The browser files on disc just get replaced. The running program (if not completely in memory) keeps the old executable files open until the program closes (but until then those are no longer the executables files you get via the directory entries). On the next restart of the browser you get the version. No reboot necessary except for the program that gets ...


4

It should be fine to delete files in /usr/share/doc on Debian-based systems. The Debian policy explicitly specifies in section 12.3: Packages must not require the existence of any files in /usr/share/doc/ in order to function. [...] The system administrator should be able to delete files in /usr/share/doc/ without causing any programs to break. ...


3

On Debian-based systems (including Ubuntu), packages create users using maintainer scripts, usually postinst. Therefore one way could be to grep through these scripts: grep -R --include='*.postinst' -e useradd -e adduser /var/lib/dpkg/info/ This assumes, of course, that the postinst script hasn't been deleted (either manually or because you uninstalled ...


2

AFAIK there is no native package manager function that creates (or removes) those functional /system users but that is done in a custom pre- or post-install script sections in RPM packages. Typically the RPM package will create and claim ownership of the home directory of those users e.g. the httpd package creates the user apache and the home directory of ...


2

Generally, the /usr hierarchy is used for stuff coming from the OS vendor/site administrator, while /usr/local is used for things installed locally (for example on a network, /usr might be a NFS mount which is shared by several computers, while /usr/local is a local filesystem). This is why configure scripts usually install into /usr/local by default - to ...


2

I use Gentoo, So i would extract the 5th field of /etc/passwd to find the info: cat /etc/passwd | grep cron | gawk -F: '{print $5}' added by portage for cronbase Portage is package management system for Gentoo. So cron account is created by portage for the package cronbase.


2

As wikipedia says, Ångström uses opkg for package management designed for embedded devices that resembled Debian's dpkg. So you can download your package, copy it on your device and run opkg install <package_name>.ipkg.


1

The files that are to be packaged need to be installed/isolated into a shadow tree. This is usually done by overriding]DESTDIR like make DESTDIR=%{buildroot} install in the %install section.


1

Warning: This is a crude way and may not work for all the users created by packages. Most of the packages that create users will be creating those user's home directories outside /home and most times their home directories will be part of the package. In such cases, you can rpm -qf such users home directory and find out the package. User ntp ...


1

The freebsd-update and pkg upgrade do very different things. The freebsd-update will (binary) update your base system. The base system contains everything except /usr/local: check /{,s}bin and /usr/{,s}bin to what programs are shipped with the base system. The parts of base system don't appears in package database, it is a separated infrastructure. The ...


1

You could use dpkg-checkbuilddeps. The man page says This program checks the installed packages in the system against the build dependencies and build conflicts listed in the control file. If any are not met, it displays them and exits with a nonzero return code. For example: faheem@orwell:/usr/local/src/julia/julia-0.3.2$ ...


1

The nvidia kernel module must be rebuilt with each kernel update because the nvidia.komodule is built and placed in the modules directory for each kernel. This occurs for a few reasons (off the top of my head): The module is binary. Each build requires access to the new kernel headers. The dkms mode switching interferes with the binary module. The ...



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