Hot answers tagged

6

List all the files in the reverse order of their installation date into a file: rpm -qa --last >list You'll get lines like atop-2.1-1.fc22.x86_64 Wed Apr 13 07:35:27 2016 telnet-server-0.17-60.fc22.x86_64 Mon Apr 11 20:10:43 2016 mhddfs-0.1.39-3.fc22.x86_64 Sat Apr 9 21:26:06 2016 ...


5

You can unpack .deb files using the ar command (since .deb files are ar archives). ar x file.deb will start the process. That will give you three files, debian-binary control.tar [or similar] data.tar [or similar] The last two contain control metadata and then the actual package files and are tar archives (which may be compressed using gzip, bzip, ...


4

You can also try with yum history and usually you get a numbered list of what has been installed, like : [root@localhost ~]# yum history Loaded plugins: product-id, refresh-packagekit, subscription-manager Updating Red Hat repositories. ID | Login user | Date and time | Action(s) | Altered 3 | root <root> | ...


4

This is still quite a broad question. Verifying packages The contents of the mirrors are signed using PGP keys, directly or indirectly. Starting at the "root" of a Debian distribution: Release, signed with a detached signature in Release.gpg, contains the hashes (MD5, SHA1, SHA256) of all the package indices and installer hashes; the package indices ...


3

The basic error is this (emphasis mine): dpkg: error processing archive /var/cache/apt/archives/nginx_1.10.0-1~jessie_i386.deb (--unpack): trying to overwrite '/etc/default/nginx', which is also in package nginx-common 1.6.2-5+deb8u1 This means that the new package you are installing is trying to overwrite a file provided by another package (your ...


3

You can use apt-show-versions for this. Running it will list all installed packages, with their origin and the installed version, and various messages depending on the available versions: "newer than version in archive" if the installed version is newer (and should perhaps be downgraded in your scenario) "No available version in archive" if none of the ...


3

That's because Debian 7 is now on long-term support, and security support is only available on i386, amd64, armel and armhf. There is no mipsel security support any more on Debian 7, you should upgrade to Debian 8.


3

In FreeBSD, you have to explicitly allow services outside the core system to start. In your /etc/rc.conf add the following line: avahi_daemon_enable="YES" (You might also need avahi_dnsconfd_enable="YES".)


2

"Going hybrid" with Debian versions is not always worthwhile, (or safe, or reliable, etc.), but sometimes it works. The hybrid version's best case is when a package from testing or unstable makes only trivial changes, (in perpetuity even), and everything works smoothly thereafter. Possibly it's already been packaged in Debian Backports, or some repository ...


2

I was able to solve this problem by following commands : mv /var/lib/dpkg/info/coturn.* /tmp/ dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq coturn This worked. And I installed coturn again, then it worked.


2

You could try creating an empty file for each of the files listed, e.g.: touch /usr/local/share/locale/cs/LC_MESSAGES/pkg.qX9SMkCPZb and so on. Once the files are there use pkg_delete -qq to delete without comparing recorded checksums. If that doesn't work, /var/db/pkg/<pkg-name>/+CONTENTS lists the package's contents and locations where files ...


2

A PGP-signed list of hashes is available, covering all the release files. The PGP key used to sign this is well connected in the web of trust.


1

This appears to be related to bug #665487. To remove dovecot-managesieved, try renaming /etc/init.d/dovecot temporarily: sudo mv /etc/init.d/dovecot{,.disabled} sudo apt-get purge dovecot-managesieved sudo mv /etc/init.d/dovecot{.disabled,} This should avoid the attempt to restart dovecot during the package's removal.


1

sudo apt-get install automake/rosa dh-python/rosa libssl1.0.2:amd64/rosa openssl/rosa should do the trick; it will prompt you to verify you really do want to downgrade.


1

Neither aptitude nor apt-get can show that information in package views, because it's not part of the information these programs handle. The information available is that contained in the package indices (which doesn't involve downloading individual packages); you can find these in /var/lib/apt/lists, and they include the following information for each ...


1

There is a component called Polkit that is used by many applications to request root permissions to do things (it can do so because it's a daemon running as root). Polkit can be configured to ask for a password (either your user account password or the root password) or to just allow it without a password prompt. That decision can be based on any number of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible