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4

Banshee (the animal) is not the same thing as banshee (the package name). These package names are case sensitive, and Debian packages have not been allowed to use upper case letters in their names since over fifteen years. Also, the lines beginning with deb are not commands; they are URIs that should be entered into the apt configuration file for that ...


4

Perl in Debian is split into several parts. One of these parts, the perl-base package, is part of the set of "essential" packages. Debian defines these essential packages as "will always be installed on a debian system". Packages can assume they will be available, even if they do not have any form of dependency declared on them. If you remove one of them, ...


4

There is no way to verify that a binary package does what the source says it should do (it's an unsolvable problem both in theory and in practice). However, if you know how the binary package was produced, you may be able to be certain that it was the result of compiling the source code. This requires trusting: the compilation tools (not just compilers as ...


3

That message indicates that apt didn't changed anything and the broken packages it tried to solve were kept in the same state. In this case "held" is used as "keep". If I had to reword it it would say: Unable to correct the problems, packages are left unchanged.


3

I think what you are trying to accomplish is very hard if not impossible, even when you can create a wrapper function to do what you want and an alias to call the wrapper instead of the actual command it all goes wrong because you usually run sudo pacman -S and sudo breaks all functions and aliases by switching contexts. But not all is lost, you can list ...


3

The easiest is probably just to install them as Stephen suggests in the other answer, but you can also just mark them as manually installed with aptitude unmarkauto <packages>....


3

Use Ubuntu elisp ppa to install latest Emacs snapshot available. After installing you need to run emacs-snapshot instead of emacs. $ sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ubuntu-elisp/ppa $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get install emacs-snapshot This will install emacs without any further steps. Good luck.


2

Debian policy is that libraries, tools, etc bundled with a program should be unbundled from it when creating a debian package. Debian policy also requires that libs be split into at least a runtime package (e.g. libfoo-version) and a development version with the static library and headers (e.g. libfoo-version-dev). What you do on your own system is your ...


2

So my question is, if the upstream developers created their software with the intention to distribute a large monolithic install complete with bundled dependencies, do the APT package maintainers need to rewrite the source so that the software uses the communal collection of dependencies rather than the local dependencies? Not necessarily, as long ...


2

I found this answer to a duplicate question on ServerFault titled: yum equivalent of “apt-get purge" that provides the only method I've seen that can do what apt-get purge <pkg> does on Ubuntu/Debian. for package in package1 package2 package3 do echo "removing config files for $package" for file in $(rpm -q --configfiles $package) do echo " ...


2

If you want to update Python, why don't you use your distro's package manager? apt-get in the case of Debian. If you want to install a different version of python, it would be best to do that in a virtualenv. If you're installing a package you're building, usually it would be placed somewhere like /usr/local/bin. You'll find most of your currently ...


2

You need to (at least) remove apache2.2-bin: apt-get remove apache2.2-bin Alternatively, you can force the installation of apache2-bin: dpkg -i --force-overwrite /var/cache/apt/archives/apache2-bin_2.4.20-2_amd64.deb and then try apt-get -f install again.


2

You only have the updates listed. The base repo you're missing is at deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib


1

There are several probabilities: Your list can be not updated, use apt-get update. You should also check if apt-cache policy list all the repositories. Is probable that the package isn't available in the repository sources you have added or in another component. For Debian, use madison, other distros have equivalents. For that package for example you need: ...


1

I have had this problem so many times I 'wrote it down' # tested works # jessie updates deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free deb http://mirror.cogentco.com/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free deb http://security.debian.org/ jessie/updates main contrib non-free # source list deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian jessie main ...


1

The other answer is incomplete, and not entirely correct. dpkg has a "hold" state. Essentially, this state means you do not want the system to upgrade the package in the given state, even if there is a newer version. This state can only be set manually. To figure out whether you have any packages in this state, run dpkg -l|grep ^h. If that produces any ...


1

You should be able to do sudo apt-get install .... and the packages you want to keep. This will tell the system the packages were "manually" installed and so remove them from the autoremove scope eg we can see my system wants to auto-remove a number of packages: # apt-get upgrade Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state ...


1

As I understand, upgrade step by step is most supported way. Upgrading is not only replacing old files to new, it also can contain conversion of old configuration to new (install script in rpm can do many things). This upgrade process tested for some popular upgrade scenarios and can depends on core system components (glibc binutils ...). There possible not ...


1

The "wrong architecture 'amd64'" error is because you tried to install a 64-bit ("amd64") package on a 32-bit ("i386") system. The libc6-dev-i386 package is sort of a strange one because it's built only for 64-bit systems, but it actually contains 32-bit software. It's meant to help with compiling 32-bit programs on 64-bit systems. Since you're running a ...


1

I upgraded Fedora 16 to 17, then to 19, then to 21, and I think most of the issues I hit probably would have been hit in a clean install anyway. However, each upgrade took about a full day including doing a full drive image beforehand, then following all the detailed upgrade procedures I've read which include doing things like checking for RPM packages ...



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