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17

I usually list out the contents of the RPM and filter it using /bin/. The files in that directory are executable. $ rpm -ql ImageMagick | grep /bin/ /usr/bin/animate /usr/bin/compare /usr/bin/composite /usr/bin/conjure /usr/bin/convert /usr/bin/display /usr/bin/identify /usr/bin/import /usr/bin/mogrify /usr/bin/montage /usr/bin/stream


6

If you look at the purpose of /var as given in the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, it says: /var contains variable data files. This includes spool directories and files, administrative and logging data, and transient and temporary files. Note that "transient and temporary" files are just one of the things it contains. It also contains "spool directories ...


6

The same for Debian; for an installed package, dpkg -L <packagename> | grep -F /bin/ dpkg -L lists out the package's contents (basically prints /var/lib/dpkg/info/<packagename>.list) and the grep picks out any file paths containing /bin/. For a deb file which you have not yet installed, dpkg-deb -c path/to/filename.deb | grep -F /bin/


5

You want the dpkg-divert utility. dpkg-divert --divert /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop.packaged --rename /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop


4

You're missing the main Debian repositories, your sources only point to the security repo. Uncomment the last lines in /etc/apt/sources/list. Change this: # deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-updates main # deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-updates main to this: deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy main deb-src ...


4

While wurtel's answer answers the question as phrased, considering the background in the question reveals that this is yet another case of a XY problem. In this particular case, /usr/share/applications/icedove.desktop should not be modified in the first place, but a local configuration file which overrides the default configuration should be placed in a ...


3

How about splitting your package into two: one part that contains the real functionality, and another part that conflicts with the packages you want to remove. Make the first package recommend the second package so that it gets installed by default, but if you later want to install something that your package conflicts with, then you can choose to remove ...


3

You can't "recreate" /var/lib/dpkg/status in the sense of just running a command and the file magically appears. No. You need to use a backup of the file, and learn never going around deleting things of the /var/lib directory: sudo cp /var/lib/dpkg/status-old /var/lib/dpkg/status This would give you the package status of the day before. Start praying it ...


3

To utilize the Debian redirector (http://http.debian.net/)... The redirector uses the geo and network location of the user and the mirrors, the architecture of the requested files, IP address family, the availability and freshness of the mirrors, and a few other things. Using main, contrib, and non-free with the redirector, /etc/apt/sources.list looks ...


3

Technically, i686 is actually a 32-bit instruction set (part of the x86 family line), while x86_64 is a 64-bit instruction set (also referred to as amd64). From the sound of it, you have a 64-bit machine that has 32-bit libraries for backwards compatibility. That should be totally fine.


2

As several others already have stated, look for "/bin" in the packages file list. Here's Gentoo $ equery f firefox | grep bin equery is part of the package gentoolkit.


2

When querying, only supply the name of the package, not the name of the rpm file it came in: rpm -q supportScripts-0.1-1 (or just rpm -q supportScripts). EDIT: to obtain a list of the files contained in an installed package: rpm -ql supportScripts


2

Google it. There isn't really a better way. It could be that some other software by the same name exists but no distribution has gotten around to packaging it yet. And even that isn't fully reliable: someone else could be doing the same thing right this minute and conclude that the name is available just as you do. You can check the package lists of major ...


2

The structure of the sources.list doesn't benefit of "minimization". There's no actual gain on compressing the lines further. All repositories listed should have the following: type [ options ] uri suite [component1] [component2] [...] or the rfc822 format Types: deb deb-src URIs: http://example.com Suites: stable testing Sections: component1 component2 ...


2

Of course, that's precisely what a 'package' is! Think of it as the install.exe on windows. You download a foo.deb or whatever file and that contains everything you need to install it. Yes, the process of installation will copy various files to various locations (that is commonly the case in Windows also by the way, not everything is in the Program ...


1

With: rpm -qlp package.rpm command you can list files inside a rpm file. Executables probably will be in some bin folder. So: rpm -qlp package.rpm | grep bin can work too.


1

After a bit of upgrading individual packages by hand, I stumbled across a conflict with jpeg-8_5, and jpeg-turbo-1.3.0_2, running sudo pkg install -f jpeg-turbo Spat out a load of warnings. I then ran: sudo pkg upgrade And some 2 months worth of upgrades are currently installing "happily". In summary, manually upgrading individual packages turned up a ...


1

No, not necessarily. There is no easy way to test. You can download the rpm/deb, extract the contents of the rpm/deb and look for any files that will be added to the repolist of the system, or look for any scripts included in the package that will do the same. To extract contents from a rpm rpm2cpio anyrpmfile.rpm | cpio -midv To extract contents from a ...


1

No. The only method I'm aware of is to interrogate the package looking for repository files. Example With RPMs you can interrogate a package like so: $ rpm -ql rpmfusion-free-release-19-1.noarch | grep yum.repos.d /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-rawhide.repo /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-updates-testing.repo /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-updates.repo ...


1

Not every OpenWrt environment ist set up the same way, so my answer is a shot in the dark... The example output is taken from OpenWrt-12.09 on a "TP-Link TL-WDR4300". ssh into your router. Check your filesytsems. root@AP9:~# df Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on rootfs 5184 2124 3060 41% / ...



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