Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Well, your distribution has TeX Live packages, so you could use those: sudo apt-get install texlive If you don't want to do that, see https://www.tug.org/texlive/debian.html, specifically the section "Integrating vanilla TeX Live with Debian". The issue is that since you installed TeX Live locally, the Debian package management system doesn't know TeX is ...


4

Actually, you can install multiple versions of a shared library if it's done properly. Shared libraries are usually named as follows: lib<name>.so.<api-version>.<minor> Next, there are symlinks to the library under the following names: lib<name>.so lib<name>.so.<api-version> When a developer links against the ...


3

It is apt-cache policy PACKAGE between release and architecture.


2

Your Package Manager is now a defunct PerlScript. I Quote: What, you're afraid to run it? Don't worry. It's harmless. In fact it doesn't do anything anymore. It used to do something (5 points if you can tell me what), but then bitrot set in. There's a moral to this story (worth 10 points). Taken from: ToastBall.net Please note that I did not ...


2

Since you installed from source code (I'm guessing with ./configure; make; make install), the RPMDB (RPM database) didn't get updated, so RPM thinks you still ahve the old version installed. If you want RPM to know about the new version, find an RPM of the new version (or make one) and install it with RPM (rpm -i).


2

You can use apt-get --reinstall install … to reinstall all the files in a bunch of packages. To get the list of packages that contain a specific file, use dpkg -S. dpkg -S /usr/share/doc searches for substrings of file names, so it'll find all files whose path contains /usr/share/doc, including a hypothetical /usr/lib/foo/usr/share/doc/, but that doesn't ...


2

This functionality is not disallowed, it is just not very common as a result of the way most libraries numbering work and because of the inconvenience of package name changes. If the use a dotted version number scheme X.Y.Z. The "micro" version Z often changes on bugfixes, the "minor" number Y changes on backward compatible changes and the "major" version ...


1

Fedora 12 is a bit old but I think you can still do the following: Look in /var/log/secure which has lines for each use of sudo. For example, you might find: Aug 11 15:16:37 home sudo: user : TTY=pts/2 ; PWD=/home/user ; \ USER=root ; COMMAND=/bin/rpm -i /home/user/mypackage.rpm List all the installation times of the rpms with: rpm -qa --qf '%{name} ...


1

Every single package in Debian ships at least a symlink in /usr/share/doc, to provide the copyright file which details the package's license. So you'll pretty much need to reinstall everything! A package's files are listed in /var/lib/dpkg/info/package.list (replacing package as appropriate); the following will reinstall affected packages: grep -l ...


1

On Arch you can use debootstrap to set up Debian or Ubuntu chroots. It's as easy as debootstrap jessie ./jessie-chroot http://httpredir.debian.org/debian (to set up a Jessie chroot; Ubuntu variants are similar). You can also deploy the Open Build Service locally and use that to build for all the main distributions. That's a bit more complicated though... ...


1

I'm on fedora 20 with the same /etc/yum.repos.d/fedora.repo as you and yum can find fedora 12 version files. Eg: $ sudo yum --releasever=12 --installroot=/tmp/ list available '*gcc*' (1/2): updates/12/x86_64/primary_db | 6.3 MB 00:54 (2/2): fedora/12/x86_64/primary_db | 12 MB 01:49 Determining fastest ...


1

There aren't any URLs that still work for Fedora 12. You could try manually downloading a few packages if it's small, or you could try to mirror the old archive locally and use that as a yum repo, but Fedora 12 is well past its end of life, so there aren't live repos for it anymore. To find individual packages, or the tree for where to download the repo ...


1

Which distribution and package manager? Most of them have a history/undo which will allow you to recover the removed packages or at least see a list of what you removed. For yum that would be: to see a list of entries in the history: $ sudo yum history to see the action that took place in an entry: $ sudo yum history info 33 to undo these actions: $ ...


1

I believe you're out of luck if you want to use yum. That's not a feature the yum package supports. yum uses a subset of all the features provided by the rpm command. (It actually uses a python module rpmUtils rather than calling rpm directly.)


1

OK I re-installed again. I was able to download password tools sudo apt-get install kali-linux-pwtools


1

The first thing you should do is check if the image you used to burn the cd/made a bootable drive with is OK and if it was downloaded from the official Kali Linux website (http://kali.org). Kali has a "Verifying Your Downloaded Kali Image" section on their website, see: http://docs.kali.org/introduction/download-official-kali-linux-images#manual


1

for everyone else with the same problem: the line "scripts" in my setup.py-file was the bad-guy. removing this line and configuring the install-file in debian-folder is the right way to install your app where ever you want. setup(name="myapp", version="0.80.04", description='My Appicantion.', author='ajava', ...


1

From the man page install (in) [options] name|capability|rpm_file_uri... Install or update packages. The packages can be selected by their name or by a capability they provide. A capability is formed by "NAME[.ARCH][ OP EDITION]", where ARCH is an architecture code, OP is one of =, or > and EDITION is ...


1

This works for me on a debian system, i'm guessing the file format has changed since 2011 . This system is pretty fresh so i wouldn't expect this to work on an older system, although that might just require unzipping the logs and using a glob to refer to all of them. grep 'install ' /var/log/dpkg.log.1 | cut -f4 -d' ' /var/log/dpkg.log has a date and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible