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16

Yes and no. *nix has a huge advantage over Windows in package management. Unlike in Windows where you must rely on third-party packages to have sane (un)installers, *nix distributions offer package managers that take care of installation and uninstallation in a unified manner. As a result, when you remove a package, all the system-level files for that ...


7

To see what particular versions are available to you via yum you can use the --showduplicates switch. $ yum --showduplicates list httpd | expand Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, langpacks, refresh-packagekit Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile * fedora: mirror.steadfast.net * rpmfusion-free: csc.mcs.sdsmt.edu * rpmfusion-free-updates: ...


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Uninstalling packages in Linux may leave behind configuration files. This shouldn't be observable normal usage, unless you reinstall the same package you removed: the configuration files are usually small and not used by any other package than the ones you installed. There is usually an option in the package manager to remove configuration files when ...


4

Using RPM Try the following: $ rpm -Uvh --oldpackage pkg1.rpm pkg2.rpm excerpt from rpm man page rpm {-U|--upgrade} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ... This upgrades or installs the package currently installed to a newer version. This is the same as install, except all other version(s) of the package are removed after the new package is ...


3

Previously, VCS PKGBUILDS included a more transparent function for cloning the git repository identified in the source array, so it was a lot more obvious how they worked. Changes to the way makepkg handles these packages, documented by one of the pacman developers here, made the overall process a lot simpler. Esentially, the same thing still happens: the ...


3

Removing vim-minimal was a mistake. If you intend to make use of sudo you have to have that package installed on Fedora. You can tell that sudo requires it like so: $ rpm -q --requires sudo | grep vim vim-minimal I'd suggest putting it back, and working around whatever the other issue actually was with vim. Fedora has always had excellent support when it ...


3

You've accidentally removed NetworkManager during the uninstall of GNOME Desktop. Reinstall it with: sudo yum install NetworkManager and restart the Network Manager service: sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service Check that you are connected with: nmcli d which will hopefully show something similar to: DEVICE TYPE STATE ...


2

Note to myself and others: The solution I use now is aptly. From their website: aptly is a swiss army knife for Debian repository management: it allows to mirror remote repositories, manage local package repositories, take snapshots, pull new versions of packages along with dependencies, publish snapshots as Debian repositories. So far my experiences ...


2

These are called reverse dependencies. apt-rdepends -r libplrpc-perl | less should do what you want. This shows the reverse dependencies of the specified package, and then the reverse dependencies of those reverse dependencies, and so on, in recursive fashion. libplrpc-perl doesn't have any reverse dependencies, so perhaps a better choice is ...


2

Why it is installed: aptitude why libplrpc-perl What depends on this package: aptitude search '~i~Dlibplrpc-perl' What would happen, if libplrpc-perl is removed: aptitude -s purge libplrpc-perl


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Does this do what you want/need? aptitude -v --show-summary=all-packages why <package>


2

Ok, if anyone ends up in a similar situation, you can use pkexec yum install sudo. pkexec will let you enter your password in your OS's GUI. pkexec allows an authorized user to execute PROGRAM as another user. If username is not specified, then the program will be executed as the administrative super user, root. This helped: ...


1

Most likely it is using the rhnplugin to access "RHN Classic." To disable a repository (unsubscribe from a channel) you use the rhn-channelcommand or the web interface at http://rhn.redhat.com/


1

Another option, you can download rpm file then instruct yum to do a localinstall: yum localinstall /path/to/package.rpm


1

Using conffiles is not the way to go, primarily because when your package is updated the user will be prompted whether to keep their old "config" file or to accept your new packaged version. The alternative that comes to mind is to just clean up these files in a postrm script, which will allow your package to completely and cleanly uninstall, but will not ...


1

In addition to jasonwryans excellent answer: Most AUR helpers have a flag to update development packages, even if their pkgver hasn't changed in the AUR. For pacaur, that flag is called --devel which can be used in conjunction with its update operations. It will cause pacaur to rebuild development package, but only if their source is newer than that of the ...


1

dpkg --search do not show /etc/nsswitch.conf because it is not registered as conffile so it is a bit of a special case. For example dpkg -S /etc/deluser.conf can be used to identify package that owns /etc/deluser.conf file. With path omitted dpkg --search nsswitch.conf actually show results. I also like dlocate utility which is very helpful to find which ...


1

You could use debmirror in debmarshal mode which seems to keep snapshots of release of packages allowing you to rollback if necessary. Seems simple enough according to the wiki. If that's too complex, mirrors normally don't delete the packages when they are updated, so using a browser you should able to redownload the packages, if necessary. Also, apt keeps ...



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