Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

You look at the post-installation script, which is actually run by dpkg. You can find these in /var/lib/dpkg/info. Such scripts contain the name of the binary package in question, and have the suffix .postinst. Note that there are also pre-installation scripts, which have the suffix .preinst, but I think that a package is much more likely to create a new ...


3

Try: yum whatprovides <command> From man yum: provides or whatprovides Is used to find out which package provides some feature or file. Just use a specific name or a file-glob-syntax wildcards to list the packages available or installed that provide that feature or file. Example: yum ...


2

I solved it by making my own install-info command and putting it before /usr/bin in $PATH. The script was #!/bin/sh /usr/bin/install-info "$@" || true


2

dpkg used to have its own install-info script which was used in place of the GNU one. An email about the change gives a suggestion for packages (formatting added): These packages should just drop their info files in /usr/share/info, and call the update-info-dir script if present (postinst and prerm). They could suggest/recommend the info package. So, ...


2

There is not a more elegant solution. A postinstall-script is allowed under certain conditions, and your package seems to satisfy these conditions. From https://lintian.debian.org/tags/dir-or-file-in-var-www.html: As an exception, packages are permitted to create the /var/www directory due to its past history as the default document root, but ...


2

What apt-get install does is executing dpkg -i on the packages. To find out what a package does while installing you have to unpack it. Look in /var/cache/apt/archives/ if your package is still there. Inside the package is a data archive (data.tar.gz) and a control archive (control.tar.gz). Inside the control archive is a script to execute after the ...


2

There isn't a standard mechanism to keep track of how often you run programs. If your system keeps track of file access times, you can check the last read date for programs in /usr/bin or for their data files. This can only tell you how long it is since the program was last executed, not how often it had been executed before that. ls -rtu /usr/bin | head ...


2

According to the Debian Popularity Contest README, This package contains a script, /usr/sbin/popularity-contest, which generates a list of the packages installed on your system, in order of most-recently-used to least-recently-used. The simplest way to use this information is to help clean up your hard drive by removing unused packages. ...


1

At first sight, I would say that the packages are installed. So if you don't want them anymore, just remove them apt-get remove fglrx-driver gmail-notify libgl1-fglrx-glx libgl1-fglrx-glx:i386 (Maybe with a -f flag to pass the dependency check.)


1

I don't think there is any such thing as country local and global versions of Ubuntu packages! If you are just referring to what repository mirror you downloaded the packages from, that shouldn't make a difference, and there is nothing to "replace". Packages in the Ubuntu repository are cryptographically signed and ultimately verified against a release ...


1

I found this response in the Linux Mint forums: The reason for having these errors is that Mint 15 "Olivia" is no longer supported since January 2014. Mint 15 is obsolete and no longer supported. You need to either upgrade to Mint 17 if your system is not too old or install Mint 13. Both versions are LTS versions which stands for Long Term Support: Linux ...


1

Turns out I only needed to install chromium-inspector (not to be confused with chromium-browser-inspector) and chromium. For some reason it "fixed" the other dependencies. The procedure was the following: Export bookmarks to a .html file (via Chromium's Bookmark Manager) Backup configs (cp -r ~/.config/chromium BAK) apt-get purge chromium apt-get ...


1

You want to hold that package at it's current version. Make sure you have apt-mark installed. After installing chromium version 34, use this command apt-mark hold chromium Then rerun apt-get install -f


1

I wrote a small python script that takes care of this problem. The logic looks at each line in the file package.accept_keywords and only acts on lines that start with = or <=. These lines have a maximum bound version so we can check if they are needed anymore. Lines without a qualifier or a >= are left as-is as we cannot know if they are obsolete. ...


1

I think the important thing your build is missing is that on make install the Makefile honours the DESTDIR variable (which on packaging target should be something like ./debian/myprog). After the build, before the packaging, the library should be in myprog-1.1.0/debian/myprog/usr/lib not tmp. Just as reference: Following is a minimal working example and ...


1

If any of the dependencies has some other previously installed packages that recommend/suggest them then apt would not remove them. There should be another package that you already have installed that either suggests or recommends that package. If you check with apt-cache rdepends pulseaudio the packages that recommend/suggest pulseaudio then there's the ...


1

CentOS - install using yum Apache 2.4 for detailed installation process Install Apache 2.4, MySQL 5.5, PHP 5.5 on CentOS/RHEL 6/5


1

The Debian wiki has some more comprehensive and specific guidance than the already-mentioned Debian Policy Manual. See AccountHandlingInMaintainerScripts: The adduser program does the right thing if called with the --system option. It is thus usually only necessary to call adduser --system $USERNAME in your postinst to create the account with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible