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3

xargs seems to be what you want: echo install update doctor | xargs -n1 brew


2

Escape the first space and remove the other spaces: $ printf "'%s'\n" brew\ {install,update,doctor} 'brew install' 'brew update' 'brew doctor' If brew is a command just write (also without the spaces): brew {install,update,doctor} like with your mkdir example: mkdir {install,update,doctor} You need no external process or piping to do that; all can ...


0

Your plist file has been converted to a binary plist file. Best practice would be to use either defaults or PlistBuddy to perform changes on the plist file. Either will write to XML or binary plist files. I'm guessing that you wish to change the key GENERAL to false in your example. With PlistBuddy you must first delete the whole entry then add the entry ...


1

You can do it : rdr pass quick on $ext_inf inet proto tcp from any to any port 1394 -> $target port 1394


2

If fig is a binary, as opposed to a script, then it will not run on a different operating system. Run file fig to find out (if the output is something similar to ELF 64-bit LSB executable, then it's a binary, if it looks more like Perl script, ASCII text executable, then it's a script and has at least a fighting chance of running on a different platform). In ...


3

You should see file with name ..PPCES20152015-02-02_flyer_ppces.pdf in the directory where the original file 2015-02-02_flyer_ppces.pdf was. Backslash char ('\') is escaping character which you use to escape characters with special meaning for bash like \, ", ', #, $, <space> and others. If you use it before regular character like digit or letter it ...


0

Most current operating are multitasking and use virtual memory and therefore use swap. For example, this Linux question Why use swap when there is more than enough free space in RAM? and this OSX question Why would I disable swap file in Mac OS X? Yes, most Operating systems will create a swap during default installation. Yes, most operation systems will ...


1

Most OS installers including the Ubuntu/Debian installer will create and enable a swap partition if you select all of the default options in the installer, in particular if you use automatic/guided partitioning. If you use manual partitioning at installation time or if you retain the partition table that already exists on the disk, then it's up to you ...


2

The ability to swap in Linux is dependent on configuration of a disk partition or a sufficiently large (specially formatted) file on an active mounted partition to operate. Generally when a system is semi-automatically installed there is one swap partition created, configured and put into the /etc/fstab file for use. OSX being a UNIX/Linux off-shoot is ...


0

Install gnu coreutils already compiled with Rudix: sudo rudix install coreutils Or download and gui install Rudix coreutils


0

You should add -i after sed to edit the file like : sed -i 's/cat/dog/g' tt.txt Should work perfectly.


0

As long as your text has the exact sequence \<cat\> it should be replaced. But I assume it only has <cat> so try: sed 's/<cat>/dog/g' tt.txt The single quotes prevent interpretation of any characters between them.


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The sed is line-editor so it apply script to each line wich addressed. So you should collect lines which you'd like to exchange in one string with newline separator(s): sed -e '1{:1;N;/<\/value>/b1;s/.*/\<something\>lorem.....\n/}' $theFile Other way is to insert necessary text before block then remove the block: sed -e ...


1

Just for reference, since you pretty much answer your question yourself... On Mac OS X /tmp is a symlink to /private/tmp. Both are owned by root:wheel; /tmp has mode 0755, /private/tmp has mode 1777. There is no tmpfs-style filesystem involved. As terdon says, if the Finder gets confused, restarting it (or rebooting) should fix things. But even without ...


0

Even though you only want to change the limit temporarily, the change must be done in a persistent way by creating /Library/LaunchDaemons/limit.maxproc.plist file, owned by root:wheel and permissions 644 with these contents: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" ...


1

Run su -l $USERNAME via Terminal to log in as another user without losing your current prompt style.


1

The newline for sed's append is break it, so you have to backslash newline or sustitute by \n symbol: sed -i '' '/user_pref("mail.identity.id1.reply_on_top", 1);/ a\ user_pref("mail.identity.id1.sig_file", "/Users/illias.seba/Library/Mail/V2/MailData/Signatures/signature.html");\ user_pref("mail.identity.id1.sig_file-rel", ...



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