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4

When you run > /tmp/foo.txt, you are overwriting the contents of /tmp/foo.txt with the output of sed 's/old text/new text/' file1.txt. Since /tmp/foo.txt doesn't exist when you run this command, bash will create that file for you and then write it. Then, when you use the -p flag to cp, you are copying the permissions and attributes of /tmp/foo.txt to ...


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You should see file with name ..PPCES20152015-02-02_flyer_ppces.pdf in the directory where the original file 2015-02-02_flyer_ppces.pdf was. Backslash char ('\') is escaping character which you use to escape characters with special meaning for bash like \, ", ', #, $, <space> and others. If you use it before regular character like digit or letter it ...


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The ability to swap in Linux is dependent on configuration of a disk partition or a sufficiently large (specially formatted) file on an active mounted partition to operate. Generally when a system is semi-automatically installed there is one swap partition created, configured and put into the /etc/fstab file for use. OSX being a UNIX/Linux off-shoot is ...


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If fig is a binary, as opposed to a script, then it will not run on a different operating system. Run file fig to find out (if the output is something similar to ELF 64-bit LSB executable, then it's a binary, if it looks more like Perl script, ASCII text executable, then it's a script and has at least a fighting chance of running on a different platform). In ...


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You can do it : rdr pass quick on $ext_inf inet proto tcp from any to any port 1394 -> $target port 1394


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Most OS installers including the Ubuntu/Debian installer will create and enable a swap partition if you select all of the default options in the installer, in particular if you use automatic/guided partitioning. If you use manual partitioning at installation time or if you retain the partition table that already exists on the disk, then it's up to you ...


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The newline for sed's append is break it, so you have to backslash newline or sustitute by \n symbol: sed -i '' '/user_pref("mail.identity.id1.reply_on_top", 1);/ a\ user_pref("mail.identity.id1.sig_file", "/Users/illias.seba/Library/Mail/V2/MailData/Signatures/signature.html");\ user_pref("mail.identity.id1.sig_file-rel", ...


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I found the solution and in the end it was pretty simple, I just couldn't see the forrest for the tree. Find out the actual username on Windows by going to Computer Managamenet -> Local Users and Groups -> Users. Account should be listed there with the real name. Then use this name instead of the Microsoft account one and all should work.


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Just for reference, since you pretty much answer your question yourself... On Mac OS X /tmp is a symlink to /private/tmp. Both are owned by root:wheel; /tmp has mode 0755, /private/tmp has mode 1777. There is no tmpfs-style filesystem involved. As terdon says, if the Finder gets confused, restarting it (or rebooting) should fix things. But even without ...


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Run su -l $USERNAME via Terminal to log in as another user without losing your current prompt style.



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