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10

iwconfig (and its wireless extension API) is deprecated (it's in "maintenance only mode" and "no new features will be added"). Use iw instead. This requires a moderately recent kernel (e.g. >= 3.0) with support for nl80211. using iw dev wlan0 scan, you can figure out the protocol used: If there are Supported rates below 11mbps (except 6), there is ...


9

Another solution: awk '{$2 = sprintf("%02d", $2); print}'


7

$ sed 's/\<[0-9]\>/0&/' ./infile 201103 01 /mnt/hdd/PUB/SOMETHING 201102 07 /mnt/hdd/PUB/SOMETH ING 201103 11 /mnt/hdd/PUB/SO METHING 201104 03 /mnt/hdd/PUB/SOMET HING 201106 01 /mnt/hdd/PUB/SOMETHI NG


6

This answer applies to OpenSSH. OpenWRT includes Dropbear by default, so you would need to need to replace it, as per this link (basically, install openssh-server and disable dropbear). With OpenSSH, what you'd like is possible using two possible mechanisms: Separate sshd configurations for your LAN and WAN interfaces. This will only work well if you have ...


4

OpenVPN is designed to be secure. It will only allow clients who have the keys signed by you. The most important thing is keeping the private keys secure. Always encrypt them on the clients and check the permissions on the key file on the server. Don't keep the CA private keys on the server it doesn't need them. Encrypt it put it on a pendrive and protect ...


4

If you need to guard against malicious damage, then MD5 is the fastest hash which is secure enough (although it does have known weaknesses and so SHA2 is strongly preferred). If you just want to guard against accidental damage, then a CRC checksum will be faster and good enough. The standard cksum utility can be used to calculate this.


4

With SSH unavailable (and possibly no UNIX/Linux machine the FTP server runs on, you could use netcat otherwise, too), the following might work: Using curl, you can upload from STDIN to a file via FTP this way: tcpdump -w - | curl -u FTPUSER:FTPPASS ftp://ftpserver/where/ever/dump.pcap -T - where tcpdump outputs raw packets (compare this question) and ...


4

No. For so many reasons. One obvious one: 802.11 = 2.4, 3.6, or 5 GHz X band = 8-12 GHz K band = 18-27 GHz Ka band = 26.5 - 40 GHz Layman's explanation of the above: The router cannot "tune" to the needed frequencies. (Then there's the DSSS vs burst detection, etc, etc, etc...)


4

1) These rules afaik completely USELESS, I'm sure about this, so there is no real question regarding this, at least a "fixme". No, these rules are useful. I'll tell you why if you tell me why you think they're useless. Ok, I'm kidding, I'll tell you whether you want it or not. The purpose of these rules are to keep the design simple. Simplicity is ...


3

'tr' can be used for this. Normally, you could do the following: tr -cd '\11\12\15\40-\176' < raw.php This deletes any characters that aren't one of the ones listed. The \NNN notation represents the character in octal, this lets us get tab, newline, carriage return in addition to the other characters. Busybox's tr currently has a bug when it comes to ...


3

Sat Jul 9 13:14:21 2011 WARNING: potential route subnet conflict between local LAN [192.168.80.0/255.255.255.0] and remote VPN [192.168.80.1/255.255.255.255] For some reason, your configuration seems to be sharing ip address space. Your VPN is selecting addresses from the 192.168.80.x address space, and your local LAN is selecting addresses from the ...


3

You could look at using inadyn, a client to update your DNS entries. There is a page about it on the DynDNS support site. Alternatively, there is this line[1]: curl -v -k -u user:password "https://members.dyndns.org/nic/update?hostname=&myip=$(curl -s http://checkip.dyndns.org | sed 's/[a-zA-Z/ :]//g')&wildcard=NOCHG&mx=NOCHG&backmx=NOCHG" [1] ...


3

OpenWRT and DDWRT are the two main distros in this category. I would encourage you to help find and fix the issue. If it's affecting both distros, it's likely to be a kernel problem that you would run into even if you built your own system from sources only. It is unfortunate that the developer community is so small compared to the user base on these ...


3

[TL,DR: use the urlencode_grouped_case version in the last code block.] Awk can do most of the job, except that it annoyingly lacks a way to convert from a character to its number. If od is present on your device, you can use it to convert all characters (more precisely, bytes) into the corresponding number (written in decimal, so that awk can read it), ...


3

I think that what you're looking for is -T as documented in man dmesg: -T, --ctime Print human readable timestamps. The timestamp could be inaccurate! The time source used for the logs is not updated after system SUSPEND/RESUME. So, for example: [ 518.511925] usb 2-1.1: new low-speed USB device number 7 using ehci-pci [ 518.615735] ...


2

OpenWRT versions from Kamikaze onwards (which is basically Kamikaze and Backfire, but not White Russian) do not use NVRAM to store settings or configuration. It is all stored in the filesystem, either in the base squashfs image or the overlayed jffs image. This means you should be able to re-flash the image and get back to "factory defaults". The way to ...


2

So where points that address you typed in a gateway field? I've never configured OpenVPN using NetworkManager but i suppose that is the place where you should provide the address of your router. And in your log file there is a line which says: Mar 7 15:42:43 ASDF nm-openvpn[23554]: Cannot load certificate file /home/g/Desktop/client1/client1.crt: ...


2

Does the Busybox not have grep -v? This should do the job in one simple command: grep -vi "<[ \t]*script" SOMETHING.html


2

I can't see a way using Busybox's sed, but you could use Busybox's sh and grep like this: while IFS=' ' read -r line; do printf "%s\n" "$line" | grep -qi '<script' || printf "%s\n" "$line" done <SOMETHING.html >SOMETHING.html.tmp mv SOMETHING.html.tmp SOMETHING.html


2

If I understand your question correctly (which is always dubious with your questions), this isn't possible. Forwarding doesn't keep any state: the router receives a packet, analyses it, sends it onwards to its next destination, and forgets what the packet was. You can count or log packets, but you can't keep track of connections at that level. It would make ...


2

I don't believe it is in the standard distribution. You will need to compile your own kernel. There is ticket with a patch already submitted.


2

To monitor traffic and other information about my OpenWrt router I use munin. I detail my experience in my posting on Monitoring with Munin. It doesn't specifically address traffic by IP address, which a tool like ntop might be better suited for. The firewall can be configured to gather such accounting data, but you would need to extract and summarize ...


2

Traffic reporting on OpenWRT is not much different than on other Linux platforms. You can use a shell to look at the interface statistics or use one of the several reporting / monitoring packages. Personally I use collected to gather some data from my OpenWRT routers and build graphs on another machine along with some other relevant data.


2

Take a look at the -C option to tcpdump: -C Before writing a raw packet to a savefile, check whether the file is currently larger than file_size and, if so, close the current savefile and open a new one. Savefiles after the first savefile will have the name specified with the -w flag, with a number after it, starting at 1 and ...


2

You can write the tcpdump output to a pipe and then save it elsewhere. I updated your BPF filter as well. tcpdump -w - host 10.10.10.10 | ssh host2 'cat - > `date +%F-%Hh-%Mm-%Ss-%N`.pcap' This will write the packets to stdout, then write it over an ssh connection to another host. You can also turn it around and run it from the other host. ssh ...


2

If you have a recent version of openwrt and you have a package called luci-app-ddns where you can configure it on your web management console. Also check the OpenWrt documentation on this issue.


2

With iptables firewall this works (Openwrt also uses iptables): iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 53 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.1 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 53 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.1 On your router use Opendns servers. 192.168.1.1 is the Openwrt router ip. 192.168.1.0/24 is the LAN network ...


2

Have a look at the IPv6 HowTo on the OpenWRT wiki. It's a pretty good starting point. I'm not going to give a detailed guide here, but a point-form summary of the broad steps to take. First, choose a static IPv6 address from the /64 block your ISP gave you, and assign that address to the LAN side of your OpenWrt router. Next, install and configure radvd in ...


2

@derobert is correct. It is unaccessable because by default you cannot access the management web-page from the WAN interface. Only trusted devices (inside LAN) should be able to access the management interface.


2

No tool other than iw can give you more information. iw already gives all information that the network driver gives. If some information is missing, update your network driver (that mean your kernel) and/or iw. An example of an up-to-date iw output: BSS 42:42:42:42:42:42 (on w0) TSF: 4922636642679 usec (56d, 23:23:56) freq: 2437 beacon ...



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