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1

The correct way to do this is to have two ranges of IP addresses: one (/64) range for the interconnection between the OpenVPN server and the OpenVPN clients (let's say 2001:DB8:0:1::/64); one (/56) range that you will subnet into /64 prefixes that you will delegate to the client (let's say 2001:DB8:0:ff00::/56). For a given client, you can use this ...


-1

As far as I think you can tell OpenVPN to hand out IPv6 addresses and it should do that merrily. However, the IPv6 packets will go nowhere as you are not planning to have a real IPv6 address!


0

From the command line, you would simply add the following to your /etc/openvpn/server.conf: push "route 172.17.0.0 255.255.255.0 172.27.232.1 1" The configuration is described in more detail here. But, to answer question about making the change through the OpenVPN AS WebUI, I think you will have use the "Yes, using routing (advanced)" option shown in ...


0

I believe you need to add the following to your server's openvpn.conf file: push "route 172.17.0.0 255.255.255.0 172.27.232.1" the restart things. The default config file has a similar line commented out with a ; as an example.


3

From OpenVPN's man page: --server network netmask ['nopool'] A helper directive designed to simplify the configuration of OpenVPN's server mode. This directive will set up an OpenVPN server which will allocate addresses to clients out of the given network/netmask. The server itself will take the ".1" ...


0

You have to enable NAT on the server. SNAT for static IP address: iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.8.0.0/16 -o <if> -j SNAT --to <ip> Or if you have a dynamically assigned IP address use MASQUERADE (slower): iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.8.0.0/16 -o <if> -j MASQUERADE while <if> is the name of the external ...


0

Write for example: server 10.8.0.0 255.255.255.0 This is where you define the subnet for your OpenVPN network. You can't find it somewhere, you choose it. The above will serve a /24 subnet, the vpn server's IP will be 10.8.0.1, the first client 10.8.0.2. Check out the manpage for more information. This directive will expand as shown on the manpage: --...


0

The "server" line is only needed on the client config; it tells the client what server to talk to. The DNS entries are the IP address of the DNS servers you want the client to use. If you don't need to use specific DNS entries (eg no "internal DNS" on your network) then you don't need to push any DNS values at all.


0

My solution was to put them in /etc/dhclient.conf e.g.: prepend domain-name-servers 210.232.10.246; prepend ...; This way, these nameservers are tried first, as opposed to when they are put in the /etc/resolv.conf.tail, and connecting to the VPN works (semi)automatically, as desired. To read more about how arrived to this solution and why I'm not a 100% ...


0

I have not managed to complete the solution with Ryder's answer. My current understand is that you can only reach the target by using Virtual Machine as described here about How to Mimic Location of Slave VPN for Primary VPN? by klanomath Create a new VM hull and attach it to this NAT network. Install a familiar OS (e.g OS X 10.9-10.11) in this VM Set up ...



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