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All my USB's are 'normal' installs. If you have an install CD/DVD you should be able to install to your USB stick or USB HDD no problem. If you have installed to a regular HDD you should be able to clone that over to the USB too, which is what I do since I use the USB's as backups.


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You can use a for loop to delete all snapshots within a range (run as root). # for i in `seq 1 999`; do snapper delete $i; done This will hit some invalid entries (when the number doesn't correspond to a snapshot ID), which will result in a harmless error log. To determine the range (lower and upper limit) of snapshot IDs, so that the loop won't run ...


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From your description it seems that the problem isn't with the LDAP server as other servers and machines were able to authenticate without problem. My thoughts were to look at /etc/pam.d/common-auth and /etc/pam.d/common-account to have OpenSuSE read from those files for authentication.


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I had a similar problem, installing openSuSE 13.2 x86_64 from scratch, using a boot partition and an encrypted LVM containing root and swap. (Side note: It's not easy to do that actually since when creating an lvm partition the installer UI will not even let you chose "encrypt this device", you can "ungrey" the checkbox however by first chosing "format ...


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I did found the locale files but not were @thiagowfx pointed. They are in /usr/lib/locale/, and they belong to one glibc-locale package. I downloaded the source package and corrected the locale for ar_SY, and now I don't know how to compile and install my modified version of package!


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Turns out it's my sogou pinyin IME used for inputing Chinese. No wonder why only I am experiencing this problem.


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The locale files are located probably under /usr/share/locale/*/LC_MESSAGES' in your system, but those are in a binary format. Their actual sources (in a editable, human-readable format) are not usually shipped with your distro. In this case, you'll have to search for them in upstream. In your specific case, try searching for the translation you want to ...


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So you probably overwrote the beginning of your hard drive, I guess you're lucky anything it booting from it. I'd expect it's written it's own partition & maybe even MBR/GPT. Using a good live cd/dvd/usb should let you delete the new unwanted partition(s) and attempt to fix things, but restoring the overwritten data from a backup may be required. When ...


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I think the better option (compared to running Pulseaudio systemwide) is to set a configuration location outside the NFS mount. The Pulseaudio manpage explains two possibilities: If a ~/.pulse/client.conf is not found, the global /etc/pulse/client.conf is used (and other config files in the same directories). To use the global settings, simply delete the ...



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