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You should set TCPKeepAlive yes in you /etc/ssh/ssh_config or ~/.ssh/config on your client, or /etc/ssh/sshd_config of your server. I am running VMs and ssh out an in of them, with this setting I have not had any recurring problems. You can also increase the loglevel by starting the server with -v, or (often easier) adding LogLevel DEBUG to your ...


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Copy them in as root and then chown them to the required owner.


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There are two issues here: openSUSE comes with openSSH pre-installed, so the ssh server does not need to be installed https://nl.opensuse.org/OpenSSH The packages for openSSH apparently have different names in openSUSE than they do in Ubuntu and Fedora (and maybe others?). In Ubuntu (using apt-get) and Fedora (using yum), "openssh-server" is a valid ...


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If the user does not have root access (or any way to gain it, such as exploiting an insecure setuid program), escaping a chroot jail should be impossible. With root access, escaping a chroot jail is trivial. In fact, the chroot(2) manpage even gives instructions: This call does not change the current working directory, so that after the call '.' can ...


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No it cannot, it would give them an error. That's the whole point of chroot. They'll be only locked up in a location without being able to go out that location. But if you want tias.


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This is simply a feature of the Cisso ssh server implementation; it parses the user name, and if it contains a :[0-9]+ component then it understands it has to connect the session to the console port with the corresponding number. Note it has nothing to do with an alternate port number, those connects happen over port 22.



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