New answers tagged

1

It is not possible in current upstrem openssh version. But I worked on the patch that would provide this functionality for both client and server. It is currently available for Fedora from copr repository. The patches are tracked in upstream bugzilla as bugs #1585 and #2468 and I would be glad for some feedback and testing.


1

There is no such include feature documented (and presumably a similar case for portable OpenSSH). Since OpenSSH has had issues with undocumented parameters (the recent UseRoaming thing), a quick peek around the source tree, in particular the readconf.c file, does not show anything obvious for includes. So, you'll probably have to find some other way to ...


1

A simpler approach would be: Just tell your users to add an alias for your git-server to the ~/.ssh/config. Then they have the same convenience as with github and you don't have to do some weird redirections on the server side. For example: # put into ~/.ssh/config Host mygitlab Hostname git.example.org Port 10022 Then your users can just clone etc. ...


0

I have never done that but maybe this does what you want: You can put a Match block for the user git in sshd_config which contains ForceCommand. The forced command can be an ssh login to the real server. You can use public key authentication without passphrase so the users might not even notice this.


0

You can't do that using only ssh_config options, but there is exec option, which can do that for you: Match exec "getent hosts %h | grep -qE '^(192\.168|10\.|172\.1[6789]\.|172\.2[0-9]\.|172\.3[01]\.)' setting Edit: Modified the grep based on the comment.


0

If you do this, (1) log to authpriv, (2) make sure authpriv can be read only by root. See syslog.conf or rsyslog.conf for details. Next, you'll have to hack the source code. At some point the password will be sent to a library call crypt. Just before that, use the logging code to log the input string. Alternatively to hacking the ssh code, you can use ...


1

The rssh manpage indicates it should be the login shell of these users: The system administrator should install the shell on the restricted system. Then the password file entry of any user for whom it is desireable to provide restricted access should be edited, such that their shell is rssh. For example: ...


2

There is no special mechanism in ssh to notify you that you use some key. It works or fails. Differentiate the keys using passphrase Only other idea that comes to my mind is differentiate between the keys using passphrase. For example, have the RSA keys in ssh-agent or without passphrase and the DSA one with passphrase (and not in ssh-agent). It might ...


2

It sounds like you want to use two different sets of keypairs. Have one prompt you for your password every time, and set up the other one to be passwordless. Copy the passwordless set's public key to the server (or servers) you want to connect to more quickly.


2

This answer assumes that both servers are Linux servers. On one server you want to log on to frequently, use this as root (as security is not a factor): ssh-keygen -t rsa Give the file a new name (e.g., /root/.ssh/new_rsa.pub). I suggest this because if you accept the default and other people were using the public key for root on other servers, they ...


0

The standard way is to set up public key based authentication. It takes a little bit of work and you can find a lot of great tutorial on the net. But if you use PuTTY as SSH cient, you can pass the password as a parameter. You can create a shortcut to PuTTY.exe then edit the shortcut to add all required parameters, so that clicking on the shortcut will ...



Top 50 recent answers are included