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Unless you need an exact size, you can have a look at LibreOffice download page - their Linux installer has around 200MB, but includes most of the generally available libraries you may (or may not) have already installed - the reason is that it strives to run on a general Linux distribution so it needs to fit a reasonable low common denominator. On the ...


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LibreOffice calls one document made up of many sub-documents a "master document". File -> New -> Master Document. You have to use the menu; it's not in the splash screen. In the Navigator that pops up, click the Insert icon, the select "File" Select your files. You may select multiple files using Shift-click or Control-click. Press insert. Repeat the ...


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Take a look at the tool OOoPy. One of the tools included with this toolset is called ooo_cat which does what you want. ooo_cat for concatenating several OOo files into one Installation After downloading it you can install the tool set like so: $ python setup.py install After which ooo_cat will show up on your $PATH. Usage is pretty straightforward: ...


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You will find detailed information about PPA packages using the link in the upper right corner of the PPA's overview: On the package details page, you'll find information about the size of the complete archive, as well as details of the single packages: EDIT: You may have to activate JavaScript in your browser - it seems the package totals are ...


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Playing around with this I find that when you choose to open a document with an external program in Firefox, what happens is that Firefox downloads the program to /tmp and then runs the chosen program with the downloaded file as an argument (read 'opens the file with the chosen program'). If you then save the file (without choosing Save As or the ...


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Do you think this is the correct behavior? Of course it is the right behavior. It only happens when you didn't choose to save the file but instead chose to open it. In my opinion, it's usually better to save everything instead of opening. Shouldn't the program at least remind you that you're not really saving anything? Why? If you wanted to save, ...


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Firefox has a cache for "opening" files. This cache is cleared up each time you close Firefox. If you open that file with LO, and close Firefox you will notice that the file will disappear. This is true for all Firefox independently they are stored in /tmp or not.



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