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12

OpenOffice comes with the unoconv program to perform format conversions on the command line. unoconv -f csv filename.xlsx For more complex requirements, you can parse XLSX files with Spreadsheet::XLSX in Perl or openpyxl in Python. For example, here's a quickie script to print out a worksheet as a semicolon-separated CSV file (warning: untested, typed ...


8

I don't think OpenOffice can be convinced to read from its standard input. But that doesn't matter. Just write the data to a temporary file. You don't want the passwords to be written to disk. That's fine. Write them to a file that isn't stored on disk. Many systems use an in-memory filesystem (tmpfs) for /tmp. Solaris has been doing that for ages; Linux ...


5

I'm using Perl's xls2csv to convert xls files to csv. Not sure tho if it works with xlsx too. About: It can't be comma separated unfortunately since some columns have commas in them that's why quoting has been introduced: 1,2,"data,data, more data"


4

I've found that turning off "Anti-Aliasing" speeds up OpenOffice on my system. The setting is in Tools->Options, OpenOffice.org->View. You might also want to experiment with turning on and off Hardware Acceleration.


4

I'd recommend trying to fix the LibreOffice problem, but if that doesn't work, have you heard of Abiword? It's older than the OpenOffice.org project and is similar to MS Word (pre-ribbon versions) or Writer from the LibreOffice suite. Another idea, if you are familiar with LaTeX, is to try one of those near- (or not quite so near-) WYSIWYG editors like ...


4

From the FAQ (url has been moved): OpenOffice.org version 1 (old) On Windows, you can use the Add/Remove Programs option in the Control Panel. On Linux, you can use ./setup and choose the Remove option. OpenOffice.org version 2 & 3 (current) If you installed OpenOffice.org through another method (an RPM, or a Debian package), using the ...


3

Using unoconv would your best bet, it doesn't even need OpenOffice/LibreOffice installed. From its home page: unoconv converts between any document format that OpenOffice understands. It uses OpenOffice's UNO bindings for non-interactive conversion of documents.


3

The flag you want is -invisible. See this example, adapted from http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=786697 ooffice -invisible macro:///Standard.Module1.SaveAsXHTML("/tmp/somefile.rtf")


3

There is no way to restrict the content type. You may be interested in these to options in the settings: Load/Save -> Microsoft Office Load/Save -> General As far as a compatibility list, no one has made one yet - that I found. You may find this website to be helpful: http://ask.libreoffice.org/en/questions/


2

Other than LibreOffice, you could use an online conversion tool like Google docs to convert presentations from .pptx either directly or via a Firefox extension. There are other online conversion tools like Zamzar to convert the .pptx to a format that you can access on your machine; format choices include: .html .pdf .odp .png


2

Importing textual data Your questions isn't entirely clear to me but it almost reads as if you have data that you want to import into OpenOffice. If that is the case then I would use one of these approaches below. CSV file I'd write that data out to a CSV file (.csv) and then open that file in OpenOffice. csv2odf Another idea would be to use the ...


1

The package libreoffice-common is right - there is no longer a separate package it's just a command line option you need: --headless: libreoffice --headless ... For the headless use in general, which did not change much, see @AnwarShah on Install OpenOffice for headless use


1

This question is from ages ago, but I will add this in for reference. Kingsoft Office 2013 This is sort of the Chinese version of Microsoft Office, but with support for English and a few other languages, and has be simply brilliant in the latest versions. It has a nice interface compared to the bog standard libreoffice - and versions later than the 4207 ...


1

Stage (the presentations component) of Calligra is able to open .pptx files.


1

https://github.com/dilshod/xlsx2csv Worked well for me. About 85 MB XLSX file converted at about 3 minutes on a Mac Book Pro SSD.


1

I use PHP. Just instal the PHPExel library from http://phpexcel.codeplex.com/ and probably you need XML functions too. This is my code : <?php error_reporting(E_ALL); date_default_timezone_set('Europe/London'); /** PHPExcel_IOFactory */ require_once '/home/markov/Downloads/1.7.6/Classes/PHPExcel/IOFactory.php'; $file="RIF394305.xlsx"; //PATH TO CSV ...


1

Texmacs will do 2 columns, and is relatively lightweight and provides rich text: That seems to imply that you don't get three or more columns, but... that is the cost of asking for "lightweight". Mind you, I just use LaTeX.


1

(I have Polish-only version of interface currently, so I'm translating the menu entries.) Look under Edit->Changes sub-menu.


1

OpenOffice/LibreOffice already includes an equation editor, Math (Math). It's usable both as a standalone program and for equations embedded in a Write document. There are two other major open-source mathematical document editors, both more directly inspired by (La)TeX. LyX is a wysiwyg front-end for LaTeX and lets you insert literal bits of LaTeX if you ...


1

Create an event-driven macro assigned to the Open Document event for a particular document or a common document. Then you would load the document by itself to act on itself or load it along with other documents to act on one or more of them. This is along the lines of the idea of an auto-run macro.



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