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If you truly mean a gpg file, then the gnupg plugin as mentioned is your best option. If you mean "how can I open, edit, and save an encrypted file with vim" then you might also explore the -x option. It will allow you to enter a password and then save the file in an encrypted form, and does the right thing in terms of encrypting the .swp file as well. ...


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It turns out that virtually all web pages out there the walk you through installing login_ldap, ypldap and ypind to do this leave out one thing. Because /etc/login.conf is a termcap-formatted file, you need to do 'cap_mkdb login.conf' for the login_ldap routines to actually see your configuration in the resulting /etc/login.conf.db file. This is different ...


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If you don't create a configuration file of your own, then it has to be GENERIC. GENERIC is the name of the configuration file to use when setting up the kernel compilation. You can create your own kernel configuration by copying GENERIC to something else and then editing it. The you would put that name in for GENERIC. However, the OpenBSD project ...


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You can change the entry in /etc/myname and everything else will still work as usual. The new hostname you put in /etc/myname won't take effect until you reboot though. From the man page for myname: The myname and mygate files are read by netstart(8) at system startup time. /etc/myname contains the symbolic name of the host machine. The file should ...


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I had the same problem. Very hard sometimes with the nVidia cards to get the resolution right by futzing directly with xorg so I like to use arandr for this kind of thing. (This is one of the few times that I find the GUI stuff better then the command line approach.) pkg_info tells us about arandr: # pkg_info -d arandr Information for ...


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The OpenBSD FAQ is your friend in this case. They have extensive documentation on how to build your own kernel. In particular you want section 5.3.4 but before you do that make sure and read all of section 5.3 to get a feel for the bigger picture. I'd also recommend taking a look at Absolute OpenBSD by Michael Lucas. He's got a pretty good walk through on ...


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I'm no expert but I believe it goes something like this: If your pf rules are static then I don't see a great way to use persist but if they are dynamic (meaning you use anchors in your rules) then rules spring into and out of existence. Persist is what keeps tables alive when the rule set changed and there are no longer any rules that reference them. I ...


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For me updating NetBSD packages is a command in /usr/pkgsrc: # cvs update -dP && csup /some-path-to-wip-supfile/netbsd-pkgsrc-wip && pkg_rolling-replace -u


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On NetBSD, you usually upgrade pkgsrc to the latest version (which is nothing more than tar -xvzf pkgsrc-version.tar.gz) and updates the installed software individually. More information on the NetBSD/pkgsrc website: http://wiki.netbsd.org/pkgsrc/how_to_use_pkgsrc/#index1h2 http://wiki.netbsd.org/pkgsrc/how_to_use_pkgsrc/#index7h1 Hope this helps!


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I needed to get updates because I installed bash and didn't want to suffer from the Shellshock vulnerability, so I went with Holu's suggestion http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/103661/93476 and it got me patched up.



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