Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

I don't think the OpenBSD installer supports directly creating and installing to an encrypted partition. There's little use in encrypting the system partition anyway¹. So I suggest installing the system normally, then creating an encrypted filesystem image and putting your sensitive data (/home, parts of /var, perhaps a few files in /etc) there. Boot into ...


9

From the FAQ (really): 13.14 - Can I have Flash support in my web browser? (i386 only) Firstly, if you are just looking to watch flash videos from common websites, there are a number of options in packages, including: get_flash_videos, minitube, youtube-dl, get_iplayer and yt. The Flash plugin is distributed by Adobe in binary form only. Adobe ...


9

Rendering HTML is a function of the browser, not the operating system. Don't let Microsoft's patently ridiculous marketing of "native support" delude you into thinking otherwise. Install a modern browser. Live happily ever after.


8

You're question is pretty general, so I'll just take a little stab at the NetBSD part: The webpage of NetBSD's vax port lists supported machines (such as yours), many can use NetBSD 6.0.1, some are only supported in -current. It also points to VAXarchive, a website collection some information that might help you further. It also points to the vax port of ...


8

I believe what you are looking for is: ls good bad >/dev/null 2>&1 You have to redirect stdout first before duplicating it into stderr; if you duplicate it first, stderr will just point to what stdout originally pointed at. In bash you can do this with &>/dev/null but that's a bash extension.


7

SMP has been supported since OpenBSD 3.6, released in 2004. Presumably the old limit was 4 cores or 16 cores. The easiest way to get SMP support is to install the bsd.mp kernel. That should happen by default if your system has multiple cores. OpenBSD SMP project As of June, 2004, SMP (Symmetric MultiProcessor) support has been merged into the main ...


7

I assume that you're wondering about amd64 vs i386, the 64-bit and 32-bit architectures on PCs (there's also a choice of word size on Sparc64). According to the official platform description: The only major shortcoming at this time is that the kernel debugger ddb is somewhat poor. Another mentioned limitation is that if your processor lacks the NX bit ...


7

QEMU is available for BSD, although it looks like you might have to do a little fiddling to get it to go based on NetBSD packages. Here is a guy that got Windows to run in QEMU on OpenBSD.


7

Random832's answer is the correct one but I'll give you an easier answer. The only part of a OS with direct access to the hardware is the kernel. In traditional unix systems, the X server (XFree86/Xorg) needs direct access to the graphics hardware, i.e. a userland process needs to bypass the kernel. This is a big security problem, so OpenBSD ask you for ...


7

There is no correlation between the number of processes and the “clarity” of an operating system. You are comparing apples and gooseberries. On a Linux system, ps ax will show a lot of processes that consume no memory and have a name in square brackets, like this: root 2 0.0 0.0 0 0 ? S Nov02 0:01 [kthreadd] root 3 ...


6

From: http://www.openbsd.org/papers/bcrypt-paper.pdf We have implemented bcrypt and deployed it as part of the OpenBSD operating system. Bcrypt has been the default password scheme since OpenBSD 2.1


6

First: packages and ports are entirely two separate things. There is no such thing as "packages from ports". From the FAQ: Packages are the pre-compiled binaries of some of the most used third party software. Packages can be managed easily with the help of several utilities, also referred to as the pkg* tools. and from the section on Ports: As ...


6

To quote the OpenBSD FAQ on What web browsers are available: Lynx, a text-based browser, is in the base system, and has SSL support. Other browsers in the ports tree...


6

This is an illustration of the difference between authentication and authorization. Sudo is primarily a tool for authorization. Its job is to determine whether you are allowed to execute a command with elevated privileges, and if you are, to execute that command. An entry like bruno ALL = (ALL): ALL in the sudoers file allows the user bruno to execute ...


6

Yes, of course. It's standard. (And there're more, also non-standard, security features in OpenBSD.) (If you meant "are there any files with these bits set", try find / -type f \( -perm -4000 -o -perm -2000\) -print)


6

The number of running processes is not necessarily a good indicator for "clarity". Take, for example, FreeBSD's devd which uses a socket to communicate where udev uses D-Bus (and hence needs another dbus-daemon process). Process count: 1:2. But D-Bus brings in a lot more features and possibilities, many other system daemons use it (handled by the same ...


6

I haven't had the honour of playing with a VAX, but OpenBSD 5.2 has mg, a mini emacs clone. So if you can't compile emacs, mg should do. :)


5

What daemon? Most daemons come with a commandline or config option to drop privileges. But if you're looking for a generic way, try: RUN_AS=my_user su -c /usr/sbin/my_daemon $RUN_AS


5

Chrome has been in OpenBSD's ports tree since at least OpenBSD 4.8. $ sudo pkg_add chromium Should do the trick, assuming your PKG_PATH environment variable is properly set. For more information on ports/packages, see here: OpenBSD Packages and Ports System


5

XXXTerm is developed by Marco Peereboom an OpenBSD developer, probably as good as you'll find for graphical browsers security wise in the ports https://opensource.conformal.com/wiki/xxxterm


5

The gnupg plugin for Vim does this: This script implements transparent editing of gpg encrypted files. The filename must have a ".gpg", ".pgp" or ".asc" suffix. When opening such a file the content is decrypted, when opening a new file the script will ask for the recipients of the encrypted file. The file content will be encrypted to all ...


5

According to the FAQ, this question results in enabling the xf86(4) aperture driver, which allows the X server (or any other process that has access to it) to directly access the video memory. 11.2 - Configuring X Good news: In the vast majority of hardware in most platforms, X requires no configuration at all, it Just Works. The details of ...


5

Short answer: The Internet Doesn't Work That Way Longer answer: IP address blocks are not neatly demarcated per country. As far as IPv4 is concerned, the parent organization IANA allocated (past tense -- they're out of blocks) address blocks to the various NICs, which operate in very wide regions as you can see here. They then assign IP blocks to ISPs on a ...


5

You can use vbetool to turn the display on/off from the console. off: $ sudo vbetool dpms off on: $ sudo vbetool dpms on This command construct will turn it off, and then if you hit a key turn it back on: $ sudo sh -c 'vbetool dpms off; read ans; vbetool dpms on' References [SOLVED] How to turn off monitor at CLI Turn off monitor using command ...


5

It's all explained on the OpenBSD AnonCVS page. Specifically in this case: $ cvs -d anoncvs@anoncvs.ca.openbsd.org:/cvs get www This happens over SSH, hence the data copy is encrypted as promised in your quoted email exchange. Once the site tree has downloaded, open www/index.html in your browser of choice. When you later want to update the mirror, go ...


5

Virtualbox will have no trouble reading that as-is: just Rename cdrom30.fs to cdrom30.iso (virtualbox will error without this) open Settings -> Storage use the Icons below the tree to Add New Storage Controller if not asked, click Add Floppy Device on the floppy controller tree entry select your ISO (cdrom30.fs). Boot, walla! Downloaded cdrom30.fs this ...


4

The canonical reference for this is The OpenBSD FAQ - 5.1 The install4.8.iso in the 4.8 directory is the 4.8 before patches. So, if you want the patches, you need to install 4.8 then patch your system yourself. The install48.iso in the snapshots directory is more than just the patches to the OS listed on the errata page, it's also everything new that is ...


4

The easiest way to select some suitable mirrors is with netselect. You can use the -s 3 option to tell it to pick the 3 best servers.


4

According to the OpenBSD ksh man page, Ctrl+L is bound to redraw. redraw: ^L Reprints the prompt string and the current input line. If that isn't sufficient, I can't see any editing command that will help, so I would suggest learning more about bind -m. Perhaps you can do something like bind -m '^L'=clear'^J' to make it type clear Enter.


4

The generally accepted practice for installing onto a flash device is the same as installing onto any other disk. The entire OpenBSD base system will readily fit in 1GB of space. It will likely be harder to find a flash device that small than to get OpenBSD installed on it. As far as turning off logging, don't worry about it, just let them be written to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible