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12

Here are some points you could start with: Have a look at the packages installed on your system with pacman -Q and remove the ones you don't need. A good start may be to append the -t switch: Restrict or filter output to packages not required by any currently installed package. Clean the package cache of pacman with pacman -Sc Always use pacman ...


6

Edit ~/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml with your favorite text editor and then, within the existing <keyboard> element, add the following lines: <keybind key="Print"> <action name="Execute"> <command>scrot</command> </action> </keybind> Use the openbox --reconfigure command to use the new settings. ...


5

The simplest is slock, the suckless screen locker. You could combine this with xautolock if you wanted to automate it after a period of inactivity. If you want something more "featurefull" you could install xscreensaver. Of course, gnome-screensaver is an option as well...


4

Alt+Space, x is the default shortcut for maximize/unmaximize in most window managers. Does that work? Or maybe it's Alt+F6 and Alt+F7 as suggested in the Actions Documentation. If not, you can add a binding using the information in the Openbox Bindings Documentation, but it sounds like you can only set shortcuts for all windows, not just for one program. ...


4

Are you actually asking about having 'desktop icons', because it seems to be the situation. I'll go with the assumption that you want 'desktop' style icons, and still use the *box style right click menu. Yes it is possible, and some good guides already exist. Although Fluxbox is different from Openbox, the minimal environment is similar. The are quality ...


4

If you are talking about icons in your panel (like tint2, for example), then you can use xseticon (there is a PKGBUILD in AUR). You can set an icon for an application like so: xseticon -id "$WINDOWID" path/to/icon.png


4

I think you would be better off just removing libnotify and notify-send from the equation, given your stated requirements they do not provide any additional flexibility of functionality. If you are looking for a minimal status bar, conky has a comprehensive amount of functionality, all of which can be updated in real time (depending upon how resource ...


4

I have used arandr, this utility allows to save a script configuring your two screens. (I know there is also the utilityxrandr but I have not used it.) I have added this script to my startup in fluxbox (I don't know where to put it for openbox) so each time a session is started, my two monitors get configured. I don't understand what you mean with desktop ...


4

Yes, Gnome and KDE provide some of their own keyboard shortcuts in addition to the ones provided by their respective WMs. However, this may not mean what you think. The fact that Fn + UpArrow produces the keysym XF86AudioRaiseVolume is mainly due to your laptop's keyboard. You can verify this by using xev again (in the Openbox environment); It should have ...


4

First, Openbox depends on Xorg so it needs to and will be installed as a dependency. Second, you can set up your machine to boot only into a shell which is the standard for a minimal Debian install. Then you can run startx (if Xorg isinstalled) in that console and this command will start your X11. To start an Openbox session with startx you have to edit ...


4

The main practical implementation is that descendants of the window manager will inherit the environment variables of the window manager. This is helpful for dealing with cryptographic key agents such as gpg-agent or ssh-agent where the login manager starts up the agents so the window manager and its descendants inherit the SSH_AGENT_PID and SSH_AUTH_SOCK ...


4

xset --help usage: xset [-display host:dpy] option ... To control Energy Star (DPMS) features: -dpms Energy Star features off +dpms Energy Star features on dpms [standby [suspend [off]]] force standby force suspend force off force on (also implicitly enables DPMS features) ...


3

It looks like a badly configured X server. Try the following: Boot normally. When you are at the login screen hit Ctrl+Alt+F2 (or any other F1-6 key) to drop to a CLI login screen. Login as root and stop the Display Manager. If you are using gdm: service gdm stop Generate a default xorg.conf file and copy it to /etc/X11: Xorg -configure cp xorg.conf.new ...


3

I have implemented this function by using wmctrl. The relevant part in rc.xml of openbox: <keybind key="A-space"> <action name="execute"> <execute>wmctrl-switch-by-application</execute> </action> </keybind> below is the code in wmctrl-switch-by-application: # taken from: http://www.st0ne.at/?q=node/58 # get ...


3

You can find key binding definitions here, And window actions here. An example here to set Ctrl + Shift + A for toggling window maxmize state: edit your ~/.config/openbox/rc.xml, put in these lines: <keybind key="C-S-a"> <action name="ToggleMaximize"> </action> </keybind>


3

Almost certainly feh is loading the background, then something else is resetting the X background during the rest of the startup process. I suspect this has to do with the fact that you are firing up the gnome-settings-daemon. This starts a whopping chain of things that will include setting the background and other desktop settings like font rendering. You ...


3

(I assume you mean after a certain amount of time with no activity) slock doesn't have that capability built-in; you have to use another tool that watches X and tracks how long there's been no activity. For example, using xautolock with a delay of 15 minutes: $ xautolock -time 15 -locker slock


3

As far as I can tell, adding these lines to ~/.config/openbox/autostart should work. Unfortunately, I don't have openbox installed so I can't check. However, I can tell you why it does not work with ~/.xinitrc. ~/.xinitrc is only read when you are launching X manually from a tty using startx or xinit (see here). When you log in from a graphical loigin ...


3

So after looking a little bit into the standard I found this quote An application wishing to provide an icon to the system tray should first locate the system tray by requesting the owner window of the manager selection. If the manager selection has no owner, clients may use the method described in the ICCCM (watching for a MANAGER client message) to be ...


3

Consolekit is long deprecated in Arch. Remove the ck-launch-session string from your .xinitrc. You are also trying to start two window managers, twm and openbox; so remove the twm, xclock and xterm lines as well. Read the Arch Wiki Openbox article on how to run Openbox as a standalone window manager. Essentially, you only need one line in your .xinitrc ...


3

Different window managers can use different keyboard mappings, and the keymapping defines how your Fn key is recognized. This is why what works in XFCE doesn't necessarily work in Openbox. To check how X (and Openbox) interpret your Fn key, follow this guide. Based on the results, you can either use the appropriate key symbol in rc.xml instead of Fn. Fn on ...


3

One application is using GTK2 and the other is using GTK3 (unless I'm mistaken). Thus, you need to switch to a theme with both GTK2 and GTK3 components. One theme that supports both is Phenix, but if you search you can find many others. Most GTK3 themes on OpenDesktop.org also support GTK2. As for Qt, install qtconfig (I'm sure Arch has some version of it ...


3

Use Ctrl-Alt-F2 - F5 to bring up a tty login. After logging in you can open you menu.xml file with a text editor and fix the problem. Once finished run the update-menus command and then reboot the computer or kill the Openbox session. Instead of restarting or killing the session, you might get lucky with the openbox --reconfigure command. Then just ...


3

OpenBox (I assume you mean the stacking windows manager) is implemented directly on top of Xlib (which is the basic application access layer to the X11 windowing system). Wikipedia provide a handy example of what it looks like: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xlib#Example Libraries like Qt (KDE) and Gtk (Gnome) use Xlib backends to talk to the very same ...


2

Xfree86 (http://www.xfree86.org/) includes "tiny" X servers in their build. I believe they are video-card-specific, in that there's an MGA server, and an ATI server, etc etc. No loadable modules. I have built XFree86 from source a coule of years ago (under Slackware 3.2!) but I don't think I tried the "tiny" servers to see if they worked. The rest of the ...


2

Have you tried Avant Window Navigator / AWN? It has the pinning feature you're after and does not require compositing although doesn't work well without it (for example you can't customise the theme). So far it's the best panel I've come across, mainly because of the pinning feature :)


2

In that case, I'd suggest using xbindkeys and wmctrl. I've googled for "wmctrl examples" and I found http://spiralofhope.com/wmctrl-examples.html#s12 So I added the following lines to my openbox configuration: <keybind key="C-F1"> <action name="Execute"> <execute>wmctrl -x uzbl-tabbed -a uzbl-tabbed.Uzbl-tabbed -b ...


2

Like a user said in the comments, wmctrl hasn't been touched since October 2005. Its very possible that the featured worked at the time, and has since been made broken due to packages changing around it. Here's the wmctrl changelog


2

Here's the answer http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1920761&highlight=double+click It's a separate setting for java programs (netbeans for example). For that create a file called .Xresources and/or .Xdefaults. Add to both of them this line *.multiClickTime: 750. 750ms is the double click speed. You're welcome.



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