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You will get that error when you were installed 2 different architecture or version of same package. If you still get error with apt-get -f install try using synaptic application ( on left column broken packages ) you can make it okay .


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One reason to do so is before doing a distribution version upgrade, especially when you know the old driver is going to be dropped in the upgrade. In that case just upgrading the driver and noticing that things don't work is much easier to revert than when you already have installed the complete new version. I had this happen with a Dell 800 (from 2003) ...


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As cas said, I could write my own tool, so here it is (not polished at all, but it works.): Client side (i.e., the GPU node) gpu_monitoring.sh (assumes that the IP of the server that serves the monitoring webpage is 128.52.200.39) while true; do nvidia-smi --query-gpu=utilization.gpu,utilization.memory,memory.total,memory.free,memory.used ...


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Apparently, there's a bug: https://github.com/Bumblebee-Project/Bumblebee/issues/699 I bet that you have issues with bumblebeed.service? That's what happens to me. There's a conflict between nvidia_modeset and nvidia, which stops nvidia from working with Bumblebee. We have to wait for Bumblebee 4.0


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You can use the ganglia monitoring software (free of charge, open source). It has number of user-contributed Gmond Python DSO metric modules, including a GPU Nvidia module (/ganglia/gmond_python_modules/gpu/nvidia/). Its architecture is typical for a cluster monitoring software: (source of the image) It's straightforward to install (~ 30 minutes ...


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munin has at least one plugin for monitoring nvidia GPUs (which uses the nvidia-smi utility to gather its data). You could setup a munin server (perhaps on one of the GPU servers, or on the head node of your cluster), and then install the munin-node client and the nvidia plugin (plus whatever other plugins you might be interested in) on each of your GPU ...


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This was solved by updating the kernel. I was on a couple variants from 3.16-3.19, but after updating to 4.2+ it would boot normally.


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The picture is moved from one port to another sometimes when the machine is booting, this happened to me with CentOS 7 where the picture was first shown at the VGA port and then later jumped to the display port. Might not the be solution but its worth checking.


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Looks like you need to start the bumblebee daemon: # systemctl start bumblebeed This starts the daemon, but if you reboot the daemon will need to be started again. To fix this also run: # systemctl enable bumblebeed That will tell systemd to always start the daemon on startup Note: This will need to be done as root


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If you need to blacklist something temporarily, or prefer to use Grub to do it for some reason, you can also edit your kernel boot options to blacklist the module as well: vmlinuz ro rhgb quiet rdblacklist=<modulename> This can be made permanent by adding it to /etc/default/grub on this line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="<existing boot options> ...


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The module might be loaded in the initramfs on boot. You must regenerate the initramfs to include your modifications to /etc/modprobe.d/* Run the following to regenerate your initramfs dracut -f /boot/your-initramfs On reboot, the driver should not be loaded automatically


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You can manipulate some of the pci bus registers of the device fairly easily with setpci. Note: this is dangerous and may crash your system! For example, find the pci bus and slot for your graphics board: $ lspci | grep VGA 00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation 2nd Generation Core Processor Family Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 09) $ ...



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