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17

The versions are as follows: nvidia-331: the current release nvidia-173: an old legacy binary driver, supporting (much) older cards nvidia-304: a more recent legacy binary driver, supporting older cards nvidia-331-updates: the update channel for the current release (but it's the same as the version in nvidia-331 now) nvidia-304-updates: the update channel ...


13

Newer kernels use KMS by default, so you should move away from appending vga= to your grub line as it will conflict with the native resolution of KMS. However, it depends upon the video driver you are using: the proprietary Nvidia driver doesn't support KMS[1], but you can work around it. You should be able to get full resolution in the framebuffer by ...


8

Check out: http://howto-pages.org/ModeLines/ , they have a good explanation of Xorg modelines. Then go to http://xtiming.sourceforge.net/cgi-bin/xtiming.pl and input the specs for the size of the screen that you can use. This will give you a Modeline that you can add to your xorg.conf file. Fields 4, 5, 6, & 7 correspond to the following valudes: ...


7

Xubuntu uses upstart, so you should use sudo service gdm stop or sudo service lightdm stop depending if you are using Ubuntu 11.04 (or prior) or Ubuntu 11.10.


7

The basic steps are: sudo apt-get install nvidia-kernel-dkms linux-headers \ nvidia-settings nvidia-xconfig sudo nvidia-xconfig The last step is running nvidia-xconfig to set everything up. That should sort it all out, including blackisting the nouveau driver if you were using it. You'll have to reboot for it to take effect (well, ...


5

SOLVED! Simple as that: /root/.bashrc had this inside: export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=always' Changed it to: export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=never' ...and restarted the root shell (of course; do not omit this step). Everything started working again. Both NVIDIA and VirtualBox kernel modules built from the first try. I am so happy! :-) Then again though, ...


5

As far as I can tell from your problem description the correct term for what you want is "hybrid graphics" as you only use either adapter to power your monitor (actually any output), not both at the same time. An overview over tools for what you want can be found (for example) here. You may be looking for the tool bbswitch from the Bumblebee-Project. Yet, ...


5

Based on your xrandr output above there are two problems; firstly the output name is VGA-2 (not VGA0) and secondly it seems that you don't have a mode available for 1920x1200. First just try setting the resolution: xrandr --output VGA-2 --size 1920x1200 If that doesn't work (which I think it won't as 1920x1200 isn't a mode) then do the following: cvt ...


4

Analyzing the code you posted as well ass acpi_call leads me to the the conclusion that most probable candidates should be: echo '\_SB.PCI0.PEG0.PEGP._OFF' > /proc/acpi/call to turn the card off and echo '\_SB.PCI0.PEG0.PEGP._ON' > /proc/acpi/call to turn it back on again. You should be safe to test those, as the README for acpi_call states: ...


4

In my experience the proprietary linux driver that nvidia offers can cause terrible performance issues with certain cards (especially older ones). The person that resolved their problem by reverting their driver to an older version is a good demonstration of the nvidia driver's regression problems. I'd recommend trying the open source nvidia driver known as ...


4

Looking into the readme indeed helps sometimes :) This behaviour is intentional to give different users the chance to have their own settings. In short the nvidia-settings config file is stored in ~/.nvidia-settings-rc and can be executed by calling nvidia-settings --load-config-only at startup. For more details, here's the relevant part of the readme: ...


4

I am not sure if you have created the string following xrandr --newmode by yourself or have you copied it from somewhere else, but it won't work in its current form. I recommend to do it step by step. First, you need to generate the new mode. I recommend using 60Hz with LCD or 85Hz with CRT monitor gtf 1280 1024 60 You will get something like: # ...


4

You can boot into single user mode or text-only mode, make the necessary changes, and then boot back into graphical mode. You can force booting into a specific mode when first turn on your computer by appending a number to the end of the linux line in GRUB2 (or the kernel line, in GRUB Legacy). When you boot your computer, press e at the GRUB screen (the ...


4

Gaming: nvidia closed-source drivers outperform nouveau drivers. Here's a comparison between nvidia and nouveau on several nVidia GPUs, including the desktop version of your GPU: Nouveau vs. NVIDIA Linux Comparison


4

Method #1 - From GNOME Control Center I usually just launch the Display applet from the GNOME Settings (typically under your username's pulldown in the upper right corner). BTW, you can summon the GNOME Control Center via command line using gnome-control-center. Example Laptop screen on left, VGA attached monitor on right     Now if I ...


4

Since the other drivers are legacy drivers or a nouveau driver you should choose the first one. Can you translate me what stands in the 1. and 4. brackets?


3

Had same issue on SLES11sp1. Only way I could resolve it was to add the LDAP user account to the local machine's video group. I was told you could also change a line in /etc/modprobe.d/50-nvidia.conf from NVreg_DeviceFileMode=0660 to NVreg_DeviceFileMode=0666.


3

I had no problems with the proprietary drivers on my previous FX 8600GT nor on my recently acquired GT430. Sometimes there are small problems, but nothing serious for me. I do some gaming on Linux, plus a couple of games with Wine, I have a lot of effects in KDE enabled and I use 1920x1080 resolution on my desktop. As far as graphics performance goes on ...


3

If you want to keep your current kernel, I'd suggest installing the yum-plugin-versionlock package, and run yum versionlock kernel-$(uname -r) (while you're booted into the kernel you want to keep). This will tell yum to never replace that version of the kernel.


3

I've had the very same problem for the second time now. Whenever I update Mint14, the problem comes back; it's really annoying. Luckily, it is a recognized problem that the development team has been working on. After you solve this there will be more problems but I will restrict this post to solving the phase you posted about first. To solve this, open the ...


3

Please add nvidia driver version (use nvidia-xconfig or see nvidia-current package version). I have one idea about what is your problem: Nvidia Optimus - driver that supports it is pretty recent (319.17+) and did not made into Mint/Ubuntu yet so you might need install manually from nvidia.com newer version: ...


3

Alright, well, I figured it out (sort of). I'll post the answer about the crash here in case someone googles this same issue. I don't exactly know why Cinnamon is crashing, but I've read somewhere that you cannot have two X screens running at the same time due to some 3D-acceleration nonsense. What this means is, both monitors are plugged into the same ...


3

Martin- Very similar setup on my end, except with a pair of nvidia GT9800's - circa 2008!. Also an onboard Intel HD4000 (disabled in bios). xrandr only showed 1 gpu, though all other sys related tools properly reported both. ubuntu 14.04 lts beta 2, nvidia 331.28 proprietary The holy grail fix for me last night was: Base Mosaic! Empty xorg.conf, nvidia x ...


3

In theory, primusrun is preferred over optirun for performance and stability, as recommended by the bumblebee devs. I'm unsure why you get the results you did. I know in some cases, frames are capped, but that doesn't seem to be the case for you. (In my case I get 150 fps for optirun glxspheres64 and 60 fps for primusrun glxspheres64, which I believe is due ...


3

Reset the user by moving everything in /home/faultyuser to a backup directory like this: mkdir /home/faultyuser/BACKUP mv /home/faultyuser/* /home/faultyuser/BACKUP mv /home/faultyuser/.* /home/faultyuser/BACKUP cp -v /etc/skel/.[a-z]* /home/faultyuser/ chown faultyuser:faultyuser /home/faultyuser/.* and try to login. When this works, move all you need ...


2

I also get the No DRICreatePCIBusID symbol error when I try to run X -configure on my system. Thankfully, I didn't really need to run it in order to make X run. These are the files inside my /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/: 10-evdev.conf 10-monitor.conf 10-quirks.conf 20-nouveau.conf 10-evdev.conf and 10-quirks.conf came with the xorg-server package. ...


2

The Nvidia driver has two parts, the kernel part and a userspace part. They have to match. Usually when you install the Nividia driver it builds the kernel part as a module. You may not have two versions of the Nvidia driver installed, but there is the old module, or you are booting an older kernel from grub. See if there is a newer kernel you can select ...


2

If you don't mind some extra aditional dependencies you might want to take a look at akmod-nvidia (also found on the rpmfusion repository). akmod-nvidia will build a suitable driver for you kernel, regardless of kernel version. This means less waiting for a new driver when the kernel version is updated. I really recommend it.


2

Note that (as pointed out by Wieland H., this answer assumes a well-behaving video driver. Nvidia's proprietary driver (which used to be required for dual-head operation, I don't know if this is still the case with Nouveau) doesn't use the standard RandR extension, so if you use it most of my answer will be useless and you need to look for an answer that's ...


2

I can't try it right know, but I found this answer to your question: fbgetty /dev/tty8 /dev/fb0 fbgetty /dev/tty9 /dev/fb1 Where: - /dev/tty8/9/n are the terminals you want to move - /dev/fb0/1/v are the framebuffer devices you want to use ... it should switch between your outputs Solution is taken from this forum thread: ...



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