Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

"Better" is subjective and not very meaningful. Nevertheless, you can get a good comparison of filesystems (including NTFS and ext4) on Wikipedia. There's also an article on PC World that covers it more briefly. Ultimately you should remember that performance metrics in this case are not really a good measure of filesystem performance, there are too many ...


9

NTFS has Windows ACEs. Unix uses "mode bits" on each file. On NTFS, each file can have an owner, and zero or more Windows access control entries (ACEs). An ACE consists of a principal (users and groups are principals), a set of operations (Read, Write, Execute, etc.) and whether those operations are allowed or denied. Files can have many ACEs. Other ...


9

I use SystemRescueCd. It boots to a bash shell (where you can startx if you want) and can mount ntfs drives using ntfs-3g. It also includes a lot of rescue tools.


8

Input/Output errors during filesystem access attempts generally mean hardware issues. Type dmesg and check the last few lines of output. If the disc or the connection to it is failing, it'll be noted there. EDIT Are you mounting it via ntfs or ntfs-3g ? As I recall, the legacy ntfs driver had no stable write support and was largely abandoned when it ...


7

The ntfs-3g FUSE driver (almost certainly the one you're using if you've got read/write) talks ADS, but not by default (except on Linux apparently, where ADS are mapped to extended attributes by default). From ntfs-3g's man page: Alternate Data Streams (ADS) NTFS stores all data in streams. Every file has exactly one unnamed data stream and can ...


7

I had a look at the ntfs3g source out of curiosity. There seems to be a function ntfs_delete(...) defined in dir.c, which does the deleting. It definitely removes all of the deleted file/directory's metadata from the filesystem structures. Since there is the source code for Microsoft's own version is not available, I can only try to make an educated guess ...


7

Unfortunately, the NTFS permissions model and the Unix one don't look alike at all. There simply is no way to sanely map between them. Use tar, but read the documentation carefully so all permissions get faithfully stored (including ACLs and SELinux contexts).


6

The line in /etc/fstab in your case would be something like: /dev/sda4 /media/A476FC2E76FC033A ntfs-3g uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=077,fmask=177 You may want to change some of these: You can replace /dev/sda4 by the UUID of the filesystem. Using a UUID has the advantage that if you ever plug in another disk which causes your current disk to appear as ...


6

The kernel driver is still read only and has no full write support yet, only with many restrictions.


6

As Sadhur states this is probably caused by disk hardware issues and the dmesg output is the right place to check this. You can issue a surface scan of your disk from Linux /sbin/badblocks /dev/sda. Check the manual page for more thorough tests an basic fixes (block relocation). This is all filesystem-agnostic, so it is safe even with an NTFS filesystem ...


6

Try using the ntfs-3g driver on fedora instead of ntfs. It should already be installed by default in the latest fedora. To test you can do: mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda2 /mnt/win7 If it works then you can add it to your fstab: /dev/sda2 /media/win7/ ntfs-3g rw,uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=007 0 0 More info (bit old but still relevant): ...


6

My question is, if I purchase a standard Windows external hard drive with a USB connection, will I be able to copy the files from the Linux cluster's files server to the external drive? Yes, there is no technical problem to this, however: The hardware us not a "standard windows hard drive with USB connection". Please scrap the windows part from that ...


6

There is a possibility to recover the partition table, but it requires 2 conditions be met: You have not rebooted your machine. The drive was in use at the time the table was changed. How this works is that the kernel keeps the partition layout in memory. If a partition is in use, it needs to know where the partition starts, so it will refuse to reload ...


6

When setting up a disk or partition there are 2 aspects to doing this. The first is the act of laying down a partition table scheme on the disk using typically either MBR (Master Boot Record) or GPT (GUID Partitioning Table) formats. Both of these lay down a "structure" on the disk. MBR If you take a look at the structure of an MBR you'll notice that ...


6

ntfs-3g is the following of the first NTFS driver created back in 1995 by Martin von Löwis. The driver has been mostly reverse engineered which mean by observing and analyzing the data structure and find a way to correctly handling it. According to the original project site The method was roughly: 1 Look at the volume with a hex editor 2 ...


5

You can do the described steps using gparted, however, I'd advice you to think twice about it. When fiddling with partitions one should be 100% sure to have a working and up-to-date backup ready because there is a low but significant chance that something goes wrong. When you have such a backup, it is probably easier to just reformat and copy the backup back ...


5

There IS a way to recognize Windows permissions on a ntfs-3g mount. You have to create a user-mapping file. See here. This can be done from within Linux too, with the ntfs-3g.usermap utility. See the manual pages for mount.ntfs-3g and ntfs-3g.usermap. (I use Fedora 14.) EDIT: I don't know what effect enabling this will have on Nautilus' mount feature. Me, ...


5

It matters very much that the file is on an NTFS partition. The : sign is not a special character on most unix systems, and in particular not on Linux (only / is special). It does not have any significance to the kernel (some applications do give it special significance though, so it is best not to use it). On most unix filesystems, including Linux's ...


5

ntfs-3g can read alternate data streams in NTFS. From its manpage: Alternate Data Streams (ADS) NTFS stores all data in streams. Every file has exactly one unnamed data stream and can have many named data streams. The size of a file is the size of its unnamed data stream. By default, ntfs-3g will only read the ...


5

According to the NTFS-3G FAQ, you can't read or write encrypted files: [...] Reading and writing transparently compressed files are fully supported, but reading or writing encrypted files are not supported at the moment. [...] So you'll need to do that from Windows at this point.


5

The id in the partition table doesn't have to have anything to do with what's actually in the partition. For example, there's no type for an XFS filesystem -- people just use "linux" (83). fdisk will say HPFS/NTFS until you change the partition type: fdisk /dev/sdb t 1 83 w And then reboot, or reattach the drive. (make sure it's not mounted first)


4

One thing that's quite different is that "executable" is a permission under Linux/Unix, not based on the file's name or extension. This is an advantage over Windows, in that on Linux you can ensure something doesn't get executed by removing executable permissions. No magic extensions matter at all. This is probably one reason why traditional file viruses ...


4

The program calling the Linux partition "unallocated" sounds like the Windows Disk Management tool. Microsoft could make it recognize non-Microsoft partition types, but they haven't. It may be that your Ubuntu partition is still there and unharmed. If that is the case, you may just have to mark the Ubuntu /boot partition active. The Windows tool will ...


4

You need to install the ntfs-3g filesystem driver and mount your drive using that instead of your current ntfs driver.


4

From what you say I think you have more than one hard drive, and each might have more than one partition. This doesn't directly answer your question, but do you really have to convert them all? Linux handles NTFS quite well, so access to your old files will be no problem. You can also configure those partitions to be automounted easily. Using Linux with a ...


4

There is a universal tool that can do defragmentation on linux called shake. You can download the source, or for Ubuntu users there's a PPA (the shake package in the official repository is unrelated). I've just tested it on an NTFS filesystem mounted using ntfs-3g and it seemed to work without problems (no errors, the verbose output looks typical). So ...


4

You are probably using the ntfs-3g driver, which is a user mode filesystem. It will show up in /proc/mounts and /etc/mtab as fuse.


4

You have to install ntfs-3g as said by @lgnacio. # rpm -Uvh http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-5.noarch.rpm And installing the epel repo. You can install ntfs-3g as #yum install ntfs-3g And mount the ntfs drive as . #mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/<your partition> /mnt/<mount point>


4

Your filesystem is damaged , for NTFS volumes you should run a chkdsk under windows system , but it's nearly impossible to recover. Sometimes you might need to format the disk.


4

A few notes from my experience: (the cause) If you hear an unusual sound during hd access attempts, and problems don't occur at (more or less) just random disk locations, then the root cause is most probably on the disk surface (not the electronics) - unfortunately, that's the sad scenario. If it were "just" the electronics, you might have had a chance to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible