Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

The kernel driver is still read only and has no full write support yet, only with many restrictions.


6

You can use ntfs-3g, but make sure you place the mappings file in the right place. Once you do that you should see file ownerships in ../User/name match the unix user. However, if you just want to use it as backup you should probably just save a big tarball onto the ntfs location. If you also want random access you can place an ext2 image file and loop ...


5

There IS a way to recognize Windows permissions on a ntfs-3g mount. You have to create a user-mapping file. See here. This can be done from within Linux too, with the ntfs-3g.usermap utility. See the manual pages for mount.ntfs-3g and ntfs-3g.usermap. (I use Fedora 14.) EDIT: I don't know what effect enabling this will have on Nautilus' mount feature. Me, ...


5

ntfs-3g is the following of the first NTFS driver created back in 1995 by Martin von Löwis. The driver has been mostly reverse engineered which mean by observing and analyzing the data structure and find a way to correctly handling it. According to the original project site The method was roughly: 1 Look at the volume with a hex editor 2 ...


4

From http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-advanced/extended-attributes/, An NTFS file is qualified by a set of four time stamps “representing the number of 100-nanosecond intervals since January 1, 1601 (UTC)”, though UTC has not been defined for years before 1961 because of unknown variations of the earth rotation. You'll find even more information ...


3

The ntfs-3g binaries must be set uid root in order for user mounting to work. And you need permission to the block device & mount point. sudo chmod 1755 /sbin/mount.ntfs-3g /usr/bin/ntfs-3g sudo chmod 666 /dev/sda2 sudo chmod 777 /media/Windows (Note: these are the Debian locations, they may differ for Suse, so you will want to check that they are ...


3

To solve similar problems in the future - especially with removable media (like USB disks), I'd recommend to use pmount for mounting filesystems as normal users. It uses a policy approach and saves you from doing system-wide changes, which can sometimes be dangerous (such as chmod 1755 /sbin/mount.ntfs-3g /usr/bin/ntfs-3g). To make a specific local ...


2

Solved It! Thank you @baharmat for all your help. If you hadn't pointed me in the right direction(s), I would still be facing the same issue. Here is how I did it. As is apparent in my lengthy question, the only issue remaining was that for some reason the file permission of /dev/sda2 changed on unmount to the default of 0660. To fix that, I used the ...


2

If it's just the dump of the partition, there's no partition table. The partition is the file, you just need to shrink the file: truncate -s 27000832000 datapartition (27000832000 is 26999992832 rounded up to the next MiB just to be on the safe side, would you like for instance to compress it to a qcow2 format or any other mountable compressed format)


2

This is how the system is designed. Since the filesystem is being mounted by root and it's not listed in /etc/fstab with the user option, only root can unmount it. You can't change this behavior. What you can do is to modify your script to mount it in a location you own as your user. You'll also need to make the block device readable/writable by you. That ...


1

That's right. Reverse engineering. Reverse engineering is basically looking at patterns for a certain behaviour and expected results and document them in a way that you can reproduce it without even looking at the code. For example, for windows compatibility network layer for CIFS/SMB (NetBIOS for early versions, AKA as window shares) the Samba project ...


1

The original code in Linux for NTFS partitions could change an NTFS partition, but required you to do a disk check after rebooting into Windows NT. I am not sure when this was, it might have been those in last millenium with SuSE 4. And not working from a live CD, but from a dual boot machine. That changed with NTFS3G, where this is no longer necessary ...


1

You could safe the times in a separate file: (cd /path/to/ntfs/fs && getfattr -n system.ntfs_times -R .) > times And to restore the times: (cd /path/to/ntfs/fs && setfattr --recover=-) < times


1

You might want to give gparted a look. We usually use this live distro when we want to resize partitions of varying types. sample screenshots of gparted                                ...


1

From 0 to Samba on RaspberryPi (Debian)! root@raspberrypi:/var/log# uname -a Linux raspberrypi 3.1.9+ #272 PREEMPT Tue Aug 7 22:51:44 BST 2012 armv6l GNU/Linux root@raspberrypi:/var/log# cat /etc/issue Debian GNU/Linux wheezy/sid \n \l This works for me on my Pi. The smb.conf is 8 lines (not counting the blank). I've connected with both Mac OSX and ...


1

I'm not finding much documentation for USN + ntfs-3g, but looking through the ntfs-3g sources, in include/ntfs-3g/layout.h, I found the following: /** * struct NTFS_RECORD - * * The Update Sequence Array (usa) is an array of the u16 values which belong * to the end of each sector protected by the update sequence record in which * this array is ...


1

Disclaimer: I did not try this, so it may or may not work; I don't have an NTFS volume around. Mount the whole FS with permissions that prevent target users from reading it. Mount a directory of the resulting tree at an accessible mount point with mount --bind and subsequent mount --o remount with different uid and umaks that allow target users to read it. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible