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2

The obvious answer, "install the command on the remote machine", is the most clean solution, so we should not ignore it: If this is possible to install the command as root, for example with sudo apt-get install fish, the command can be run like this: ssh remote -t fish The question is about what to do when we can not install a command on the remote ...


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Install your favorite shell on the remote machine. You don't need any administrator privileges to do that, you can install programs in your home directory, it's just less convenient. See Installation on debian 5 32-bit without being a root, How to install program locally without sudo privileges?, Keeping track of programs and other questions. If you want to ...


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The basic approach is to copy the shell executable to the remote host using scp then execute it using ssh, e.g. scp /usr/bin/fish remote:fish && ssh -t remote '~/fish' The -t is needed so that ssh allocates a tty, which it wouldn't do by default when executing a remote command. This assumes your remote host is running the same operating system. ...


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User can use sshfs to mount his remote $HOME on his local machine. In such scenario, user wouldn't use his shell of choice on the remote machine directly but, still, better than nothing.


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I don't think you can run a shell that is on one machine on another. The only way to run it on the remote machine is to install it.


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Simple answer: No, you cannot use on a remote box a program that is not installed on the remote box. Workaround: You do not need admin privileges to install a shell on the remote system. You can install it in your home directory but probably you have to compile it from the sources. Typically using something like configure --prefix=${HOME}/local Last note: ...


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If you need to do something that requires root privileges, you need to use some method of gaining root privileges, which on most modern systems means su, sudo, or a wrapper around one of these. What's dangerous about running commands as root (whether it's with su or sudo) is that it gives you a lot more ways to damage your system. So you should only run a ...


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While keeping in mind that there are no free meals, it's possible to minimize risk. If you'd like to run your script as root and immediately exit without password prompt and exit command then you'll have to compromise a bit. The following solution lets you store your encrypted twice (or more) root password anywhere with the current user permissions. ...


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You can also use the wrapper application Renv. excerpt Simple R Version Management: Renv Renv lets you easily switch between multiple versions of R. It's simple, unobtrusive, and follows the UNIX tradition of single-purpose tools that do one thing well. Renv does… Let you change the global R version on a per-user basis. Provide ...


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Build from source with ./configure --prefix=/local/data/project/behi ; make ; make install If you're installing from an RPM package and it was created relocatable, you could use rpm ... --prefix /local/data/project/behi But not all packages are built with relocatable binaries, and I don't think debian packages have this option (although you might ...


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The easiest way to do this is to install R from source: $ wget http://cran.rstudio.com/src/base/R-3/R-3.1.1.tar.gz $ tar xvf R-3.1.1.tar.gz $ cd R-3.1.1 $ ./configure --prefix=$HOME/R $ make && make install The second-to-last step is the critical one. It configures R to be installed into a subdirectory of your own home directory. To run it on ...


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I use gksu: gksu -u myotheruser /opt/netbeans/7.3/bin/netbeans Maybe try also kdesu.


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Thank for your answers, they were useful, but I figure out my own solution. Recreating the initrd image can be done with fakeroot-ng (and probably with fakeroot also). The base idea of the tools it to wrap all system calls, so all programs executed within fakeroot environment thinks, they are run by a root. I call part of my script within fakeroot ...


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The reason for EPERM (the permission denied error ) is here: drwxr-xr-x 5 www-data www-data 4096 juil. 30 13:47 . The directory where you are trying to create a file (in other words change contents of the directory-file) is writeable only for user www-data, which you are not. Either mark the directory as writeable for the group, change the user to ...


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There are a few ways to output the user ID (UID) with ps; a simple one is with -f: ps -fC X Will give you information for all the X servers that are running (there can be more than one). This presumes that the executable is called X -- if there's no such process, you will have to target something else. Since it almost certainly at least has capital X in ...


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Some older Unixes allowed to "give away" file ownership, but that has been abandoned long ago. In the days of true multiuser-boxes where hundreds of users connected through terminals to a unix machine, people learned to abuse this to get around their disk quotas. Moreover, giving away files is in some sense a form of social engineering, by which unwary ...



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