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The easiest way to do this is to install R from source: $ wget http://cran.rstudio.com/src/base/R-3/R-3.1.1.tar.gz $ tar xvf R-3.1.1.tar.gz $ cd R-3.1.1 $ ./configure --prefix=$HOME/R $ make && make install The second-to-last step is the critical one. It configures R to be installed into a subdirectory of your own home directory. To run it on ...


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Install your favorite shell on the remote machine. You don't need any administrator privileges to do that, you can install programs in your home directory, it's just less convenient. See Installation on debian 5 32-bit without being a root, How to install program locally without sudo privileges?, Keeping track of programs and other questions. If you want to ...


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Simple answer: No, you cannot use on a remote box a program that is not installed on the remote box. Workaround: You do not need admin privileges to install a shell on the remote system. You can install it in your home directory but probably you have to compile it from the sources. Typically using something like configure --prefix=${HOME}/local Last note: ...


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If you need to do something that requires root privileges, you need to use some method of gaining root privileges, which on most modern systems means su, sudo, or a wrapper around one of these. What's dangerous about running commands as root (whether it's with su or sudo) is that it gives you a lot more ways to damage your system. So you should only run a ...


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You can also use the wrapper application Renv. excerpt Simple R Version Management: Renv Renv lets you easily switch between multiple versions of R. It's simple, unobtrusive, and follows the UNIX tradition of single-purpose tools that do one thing well. Renv does… Let you change the global R version on a per-user basis. Provide ...


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The obvious answer, "install the command on the remote machine", is the most clean solution, so we should not ignore it: If this is possible to install the command as root, for example with sudo apt-get install fish, the command can be run like this: ssh remote -t fish The question is about what to do when we can not install a command on the remote ...


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The basic approach is to copy the shell executable to the remote host using scp then execute it using ssh, e.g. scp /usr/bin/fish remote:fish && ssh -t remote '~/fish' The -t is needed so that ssh allocates a tty, which it wouldn't do by default when executing a remote command. This assumes your remote host is running the same operating system. ...


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User can use sshfs to mount his remote $HOME on his local machine. In such scenario, user wouldn't use his shell of choice on the remote machine directly but, still, better than nothing.



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