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4

Because any directory is valid mountpoint The content of the latest mounted share will be listed AFAIK you cannot. The latest mount will be unmounted firstly # mkdir testmount # mount --bind /bin/ testmount/ # mount --bind /usr/bin/ testmount/ # mount |grep testmount /bin on /testmount type none (rw,bind) /usr/bin on /testmount type none ...


3

You can only use * on its own or in domain names. Replace it with ip/numberofbits: /home/pi/workspace 192.168.1.0/24(rw,no_subtree_check,sync,root_squash) See man exports or debian handbook Each machine can be identified either by its DNS name or its IP address. Whole sets of machines can also be specified using either a syntax such as *.falcot.com or ...


2

The automounter was designed exactly for this kind of problem. It automatically mounts drives (local or remote) only when they are needed, and unmounted them when they are no longer being used. Install autofs on your NFS client and comment out (or remove) the entries in /etc/fstab. Edit /etc/auto.master and ensure that there is a line like this uncommented ...


2

This is normal behaviour. Mounted filesystems are normally not re-exported by nfs. You have to share both. E.g. you can add this to MachineA exports: /data/Storage MachineB(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,no_root_squash) You might also need to add crossmnt option into the /data options in exports of MachineA or nohide to /data/Storage options in order ...


1

NFS permissions are only read and write...if you permit writing, then editing and deleting files is possible besides creating and moving files.


1

The Subversion code ends up trying to obtain a lock on the txn-current-lock file via a call to apr_file_lock(). You should be able to reproduce the error with the following test: #include <apr_general.h> #include <apr_file_io.h> #include <apr_pools.h> #include <stdio.h> int main(int argc, const char * const *argv, const char * ...



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