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3

Archemar is correct, you don't need NFS for PXE, it's just convenient for diskless installations. Nfs can be used for diskless setups, where the root filesystem is mounted from a common nfs store. An example using RHEL: After creating a root filesystem (either using rsync or with yum installroot) and exporting it, In your tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg use label ...


3

You don't need NFS to use PXE booting. PXE booting consist of an IP (usualy given by DHCP server), and downloading kernel (usualy via TFTP), kernel then is loaded into memory. At this point, either the host has local disks, or not. Obviously, if you don't have local disks, you'll need some way to share resources. This is where NFS comes into play. Note ...


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A process in 'D' state is normally (but not always) "blocked on I/O wait". This can happen if a disk is busy and suffering high service times, for example. Process in D state count towards the load average, even though they're not using real CPU resources. In the case of NFS, a process can spend a lot of time in 'D' state waiting for the NFS server to ...


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nfs4 does not use uid numbers but usernames. You can add to your /etc/idmapd.conf [Translation] Method=static [Static] fred@remote = localfred where fred is the username on the remote, and localfred is the local username.


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You need a shared storage device, but do you really need NFS? You could try things like OCFS2 (a shared-disk clustering file system, which expects that the same block device is opened on multiple machines, and has been in the Linux kernel since 2.6.16) or ceph (a clustering file system which shares data over ethernet or similar, expecting individual nodes ...


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You didn't specify the OS of the server, nor the server code. If it's the standard Linux client then you specify "insecure" as part of the export eg /directory server(rw,no_root_squash,async,insecure)


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Oopss! So I guess NFS, when set up correctly ^_^, does infact do a two way syncronization. The problem was that my /etc/fstab was not set up correctly so while I had a /home/ubuntu on Server A and a /home/ubuntu on Server B, I was not mounting A to B, so they changes I made to B were not reflected on A!


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Add to your config CROSSFILESYSTEMS=true That should let it follow NFS mounts. (At least in the opensource version).



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