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11

Wicd is a very good Wi-Fi manager. It uses the traditional tools for network management without extra layers. It meets your requirements. Remember to stop and uninstall all NetworkManager packages for avoid conflicts.


10

Under Linux, you can use the iw* series of commands to configure and display information about wireless networks: iwconfig - configure a wireless network interface iwlist - Get more detailed wireless information from a wireless interface iwpriv - configure optionals (private) parameters of a wireless network interface iw - show / manipulate wireless ...


10

The best way to guarantee the same IP at all times for a given host is to set up a MAC Address IP reservation in the DHCP server. Get the MAC address if your laptop, then go to your DHCP server, and assign a specific IP address to be issued to a host requesting from that MAC address.


9

The dhclient that NetworkManager calls should be the same irregardless. On my Fedora 19 system I'm getting the following command run via NetworkManager when I allow it to connect: /sbin/dhclient -d -sf /usr/libexec/nm-dhcp-client.action \ -pf /var/run/dhclient-wlp3s0.pid \ -lf ...


8

Upstream added a separate service for the dispatcher. Try running: systemctl enable NetworkManager-dispatcher.service then systemctl start NetworkManager-dispatcher.service Since dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service is an alias, it should be working: systemctl status dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service NetworkManager-dispatcher.service - ...


7

Mostly to make configuration "just work" smoothly when one has a diversity of connection methods (many different Wi-Fi networks, Ethernet, 3G, Bluetooth etc...). Configuring some of those by hand can be a hassle, specially when you only need them temporarily (e.g. on a laptop). Of course, one can fall back to the older config and do it by hand or use, ...


5

If you are using NetworkManager (which, I believe Xubuntu does), it should be in /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf. There is more information about it here: http://live.gnome.org/NetworkManager/SystemSettings.


5

sudo iwlist wlan0 scan Assuming your wireless is wlan0, of course. If you're not sure, iwconfig should tell you.


5

NetworkManager has its own place for hooks in /etc/NetworkManager/dispatcher.d/. Scripts in there get called whenever an interface changes state, see the NetworkManager manpage for all gory details.


4

Since version 0.8.1, Network Manager comes with a command line tool, nmcli. Its capabilities in older versions are very limited; for the most part, you can use it to view available connections and switch between them but not configure new ones. Since version 0.9.6, nmcli can create new connections. There are other, third-party command-line interfaces to ...


4

NetworkManager has the functionality to manage a local dnsmasq server built in. It is not necessary to use resolvconf/openresolv to do this. To enable this: Disable the resolvconf/openresolv dnsmasq configuration if it was previously enabled, and ensure there are no instances of dnsmasq running. Ensure dnsmasq is installed Add dns=dnsmasq to ...


4

This is a known issue and several bug reports have been submitted. There is also a workaround for ubuntu, but I don't think it will work for Arch users because they no longer use init scripts. I bet their fix can be ported but I don't know enough about systemd to do it. Here is a solution from the Fedora forums that looks like it works: Right-click on ...


4

One method for configuring multiple NIC cards is through the use of what's called bonding. It goes by other names as well: Bonding Channel Bonding Link Aggregation Using NetworkManager What version of NetworkManager are you using? Version 0.9.8 is the first that purports to offer support for network bonding. excerpt from phoronix.com Add a ...


4

Method 1# Find NetworkManager configuration file and add/modify following entry in CentOS5 it is in /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf Or /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/ and edit your DSL connection file : [ipv4] method=auto dns=8.8.8.8;4.2.2.2; ignore-auto-dns=true Note:- if [ipv4] not work then try with [ppp] Method 2# You can Change ...


4

Yes. You could choose the public city wifi setting from networkmanager and disable automatic connection: Manage Connections -> Wireless -> Choose Access Point(City's Wifi in this case) -> Uncheck "Connect Automatically"


4

You should be able to add a hidden network like so using NetworkManager. Step #1 - open NetworkManager's main menu                                   ...


4

I'm guessing I could alter the point at which the script runs by messing with the WantedBy parameter That will have the opposite effect of what you want. From man systemd.unit: WantedBy=, RequiredBy= [...] A symbolic link is created in the .wants/ or .requires/ directory of each of the listed units when this unit is installed by ...


4

Recent versions of the network-manager package on Ubuntu should provide the nmcli utility - which should enable you to do what you want from the command line. I'm not sure exactly the equivalent to the GUI settings you are describing, but probably nmcli nm wifi on If you need to re-enable networking as a whole (rather than just the wifi component), then ...


3

If the modem is recognised, but fails to connect check these (rfkill control wireless devices blocking on your system): # get a list of devices and states rfkill list # unblock all wireless devices. With one integrated card this is not enough # for some reason and I have to leave it "on" on Windows 7 to # get it to work on linux rfkill unblock all To ...


3

Network Manager may ignore interfaces configured in /etc/network/interfaces, so check that your interface isn't already in there. If it is, remove it and reboot. Network Manager has a config file for which interfaces to manage at /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf It may have managed=false which you could need to change to true. The network ...


3

It must be just the KDE front-end because the basic NetworkManager meets both of the requirements above for me and has for all versions over the last several years. Is it possible for you to either use the NetworkManager provided interface instead of the KDE wrapper or that you are using the wrapper wrong and have it mis-configured so that it doesn't work? ...


3

At a very basic level, nohup cnetworkmanager -C 'ESSID' --unprotected & but it might be worth thinking about writing it as a daemon, or a service of some kind if the tool doesn't already support it. You could also run it in the foreground, then background it, cnetworkmanager -C 'ESSID' --unprotected Then hit CTRL-Z which drops you to the command ...


3

I had similar problems with NetworkManager under AwesomeWM (sic!) (on a Ubuntu 11.10 system). After fixing other permission related stuff I noticed that NM applet also needs a ConsoleKit session. To check if this also your problem you can start the NM applet like this: $ ck-launch-session nm-applet (for testing purposes you can start it from an xterm)


3

Without knowing which method you used, this writeup (a little dated, for Etch) suggests what all it takes is to have the DHCP server listen on the right interface. (Sounds about right, doesn't it?) The Debian Wiki has an DHCP server entry, the Basic configuration mentioned there should be sufficient for your case.


3

From OP's comment: Since I can't answer my own question because I do not have enough reputation on this stackexchange (yet): I found the root cause. I'll share it here for anyone who hits the same problem. The problem was that Sabayon ships with ufw (a firewall, it seems) per default. For some unknown reason, this failed to initialize properly. ...


3

Use NetworkManager, that is the way forward. It used to do weird things a while back, but that has been ironed out now. If you have some exotic setup, try to integrate it there. Only edit the files under /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts by hand as last resort.


3

I do not know if it's standard, but in Ubuntu there are script that are run before suspend / after resume in /etc/pm/sleep.d and in /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d. In my system seems that the network is shut down by /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/60_wpa_supplicant. You can write a script for example /etc/pm/sleep.d/10-umount to unmount your shares before suspend. The ...


3

Uses the same antenna. Currently most software doesn't allow to be in client and AP mode at the same time. Wireless is a half-duplex protocol, except for some really new bleeding edge stuff. The radio can only transmit or receive at one time, it cannot do both at the same time. Going with point 3, if any software was developed to allow both client and AP ...


3

You can use After in [Unit] section to define a service that should be started before your service starts. For example if you are using NetworkManager, you can make your service start after NetworkManager is started. [Unit] Description=test service After=NetworkManager.service


3

Change the used loglevel in your NetworkManager.conf file [logging] This section controls NetworkManager's logging. Any settings here are overridden by the --log-level and --log-domains command-line options. level=<level> One of [ERR, WARN, INFO, DEBUG]. The ERR level logs only critical errors. WARN ...



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