Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I'm not 100% familiar with Airdrop but in looking at the Wikipedia page on the topic it essentially sounds like a file sharing (P2P) without having to have an access point in the mix. Basically 2 WiFi clients can share files among each other. To that end there are 2 options listed at the bottom of that same Wikipedia page. Shoutr Wi-Fi Direct The first ...


0

Unison is intrinsically peer-to-peer. This is precisely why a star topology is recommended: the tool does not have any notion of central server, so it's up to the user to enforce one. You can certainly use Unison in a peer-to-peer way, but there's no miracle: for every pair of machines (A,B), you need to pick one of the machines (say A) and create a profile ...


1

Install HostAPD: yast -i hostapd Configure hostapd in the file /etc/hostapd.conf, especially consider the settings (ESSID will be test, driver will be for the WLAN driver, bridge will be for the bridge you create later on, channel is arbitrary, hw_mode=g means the speed as in A/B/G/N). driver=nl80211 bridge=br0 channel=3 ...


0

Have you tried the ap-hotspot method? It takes your Ethernet cable and sends it out wirelessly. Not as ad-hoc. That is something else, I use the method quite often. Article here. Anyway, here's how it works. You can think of this as reverse tethering as long as you are Ethernet-connected. I wrote the article quite a long time ago, so I know it works but ...


4

The simplest method I know to list all of your interfaces is ifconfig -a EDIT If you're on a system where that has been made obsolete, you can use ip link show


9

The kernel lists them by name in /sys, both separately in (e.g.) the tree of PCI devices -- although finding them there if you don't know where they are to start with is not simple -- and together via symlinks in /sys/class/net. E.g.: > ls /sys/class/net em1 lo wlp6so Another example: > ls /sys/class/net lo p6s1 wlan0 If you are not sure which is ...


0

It seems that you are not passing any MAC information to the kernel. Maybe you have defined your own method (like "ethadd=" boot argument), but you have failed to adapt the driver to pick up information from it.


1

The whole setup is too long to be described here, also there are multiple ways how you might want to configure it, so to provide an overview: You need to setup OpenVPN server. I would advice to do it on a VPS with external IP. Setup OpenVPN clients on other servers and android devices to connect to your OpenVPN server. You can find quick ...


2

I have always used Unison in a star topology to synchronise my four machines. The reason for this is that it is not a versioning file system (like git for example), but rather a synchronisation tool. If you do opt for a distributed topology (which you will have to set by creating a configuration file for each device and synchronising all), you will ...


5

Your school firewall is probably blocking most traffic outbound on ports other than TCP/80 which is the default IP port for web traffic. In particular ping and (most of the time) traceroute send the ICMP ECHO_REQUEST packet and many companies and schools block all ICMP traffic through their firewalls as it can be used to find out information of the network ...


6

Yes it's entirely possible that your firewall is blocking the traceroute from being successful. To understand why this is failing it's best to consult the traceroute man page. excerpt This program attempts to trace the route an IP packet would follow to some internet host by launching probe packets with a small ttl (time to live) then listening for an ...


6

So as per my understanding, the firewall of my school network is blocking my server from contacting the outside world. Is this correct? No, I guess it can block almost all traffic but allow at least TCP port 80. traceroute in Linux default use UDP, ping use ICMP, so as your output, it seems that those traffic have been blocked by the firewall. How ...


0

You don't say what version of Red Hat you're using, you can check like this: $ cat /etc/redhat-release Fedora release 19 (Schrödinger’s Cat) You likely have some old version of Fedora on it. Perhaps Fedora Core 5 or 6 with that version of GNOME. In those ancient versions I believe they came with a version of NetworkManager. There's typically a GUI for ...


3

You could get this with a small set of iptables rules redirecting all traffic to port 80 and 443 your AP's address: # iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 # iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 Additionally you should have your HTTP server configured to ...


0

mkdir /usr/src <--This directory may already exists cd usr/src wget https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/linux-2.6.27.7.tar.gz tar -xvf linux-2.6.27.7.tar.gz ln -s /usr/src/linux-2.6.27.7 /usr/src/linux cd /usr/src/linux tar -xvf <nameofdriverdownload>.tar.gz <--If all goes well, this should inject the driver you downloaded into the ...


2

I don't know about Windows Phones or iPhones, but Android phones cannot detect ad-hoc networks out of the box. You will probably need to use infrastructure mode in order for your phone to see your network. Alternatively, search for Android add-ons that enable connections to ad hoc wifi networks (success seems dependent on the device and Android version).


-1

You can get stats from netstat via the -s flag, and per-process from the -p flag.


1

You're looking for bonding. This driver is intended for (surprise!) bonding individual links to one logical link. Several modes are supported, one of them is fail-over mode (you have one primary link, in your case wired ethernet, and several fail-over links, which take over when the primary link fails). What you'll need is CONFIG_BONDING enabled in the ...


0

You need a remote machine running ssh that you can connect to from the Pi. Enable AllowTCPForwarding on the remote machine then connect from the Pi and create a SOCKS proxy using the ssh connection. Then configure your iphone to use the Pi as a proxy and there you go. But there's 2 problems I see, 1, you'll have to make the SOCKS proxy accessible to other ...


1

As discussed in the comments, it seems like the problem was the VPN gateway wrongly sending ICMP redirects to the app server because setting the sysctl settings net.ipv4.conf.all.send_redirects and/or net.ipv4.conf.eth0.send_redirects to 0 appears to have solved the problem. I don't know why the VPN gateway would tell the app server to go via the outer ...


2

Gilles' answer is completely correct, but there is also another potential cause for this. There was a bug in version 2.3.0 of OpenVPN which would disconnect clients when sending large chunks of data: https://community.openvpn.net/openvpn/ticket/263 This issue only occurred when using TCP. UDP was completely unaffected.


5

You have the symptoms of an MTU problem: some TCP connections freeze, more or less reproducibly for a given command or URL but with no easily discernible overall pattern. A telltale symptom is that interactive ssh sessions work well as long as you don't run commands with large output. See Can't access select https sites on Linux over PPPoE for an ...


1

Ostinato looks to be one such tool that you're looking for. Ostinato is an open-source, cross-platform network packet crafter/traffic generator and analyzer with a friendly GUI. Craft and send packets of several streams with different protocols at different rates. Screenshot      Screencast Ostinato Packet/Traffic Generator ...


0

You have to enable loopback routing. I did this on my router with the following: iptables -A FORWARD -o eth1 -d $IP -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT In my setup, eth0 is the internet interface, $IP is the internet IP, and eth1 is the internal interface. The key here is that you need a FORWARD rule for ...


1

I think that the error does not come from the -net statement, but from: -chardev socket,host=localhost,port=7777,server,nowait,id=port1-char The statement uses already the port 7777. For the port forwarding, with -net user,hostfwd=tcp::7777-:8001 it works fine when not setting up the virtio serial channel. If I understand right, you want to set up a ...


0

Master mode is used for Access Points or other Wireless broadcast systems. Managed mode is for client cards I guess.


0

I believe you need to use hostfwd=tcp::7777-:8001 or hostfwd=tcp::7777:8001


4

I did this exact thing this morning. First, double check that the lease isn't allocated. Go to the Status page and then the LAN page on DD-WRT. Check the lease in the list of DHCP clients. If it's allocated, click the trash can. I also have my lease set to 5 minutes. If I left it for a whole day, which is the default, I found that if the signal got ...


1

Assume eth0 is dhcp client interface. One of options is to check dhcp client lease files dhcpd.leases Place and name depend on system, some fedora box under /var/lib/dhclient/ are lease files, where interesting string is like that : option routers 192.168.1.1; Another option, which worked for me on funtoo box: dhcpcd -U eth0 prints nice table, ready to ...


3

Your mistake is that you're associating the information on the netstat output with the interface rather than the destination. Destination addresses can have associated gateways. When you configure your network, you're associating interfaces and gateways with sets of destination addresses -- so the question you need to be asking is "what's the gateway for ...


1

You can set the ip in /etc/network/interfaces. It's not showing because it seems that you are using network-manager. My /etc/network/interfaces cat /etc/network/interfaces # interfaces(5) file used by ifup(8) and ifdown(8) auto lo iface lo inet loopback It's because I am also using network-manager. You can also check the following link for network ...


0

Run ifconfig -a and show me you've got a real, usable IP. I Bet moving out from behind the NAT also lost you a DHCP (via dnsmasq) server from which to get a usable IP, and you're not getting one. Easiest thing is to get behind that NAT again and be well (service network restart or just reboot) . Otherwise, if you ARE getting a usable IP from some DHCP ...


0

While iwconfig prints the RTS threshold anyway, iw prints it only when the RTS mechanism is enabled. In order to read the value the command is iw phy phy0 info | grep RTS which outputs no lines if RTS is off or something like RTS threshold: <number> if it's enabled.


0

first you need to figure out if you are getting through the proxy curl http://www.google.com URL --proxy http://xxx.xxx.xx.xx:8080 if it is at work, I bet you it is an authenticated proxy.. save this script below as connect.sh, chmod +x connect.sh to make it runable. then run #!/bin/bash echo -n "User:"; read user echo -n "Password:"; read -s ...


0

The solution was the tip that @devnull gave at the comments: Execute each funcion on background # Trata comentários na lista de switches egrep -v '(^#|^\s*$|^\s*\t*#)' $LISTA_SWITCHES | while read IP SWNOME SERVER TIPO do if [ "$TIPO" = core ]; then pc6248 & elif [ "$TIPO" = dep ]; then pc3548 & ...


3

Where is $network defined? This is a good question, and I've generalized it here. How exactly is $network defined via the +networking +ifupdown elements? AFAICT it isn't defined by that, it defines what services must (optionally) also declare any dependencies the facility has (?? -- see the question I posted and linked above). From man insserv: ...


1

There is no default, because it always depends the hardware capabilities and the configuration. They are always negotiated at handshake stage. To see your WiFi capabilites use iw phy See also HT20/40. Some tcpdump wireless filters.


1

Your interface name is eth1 and not wlan0. Replace wlan0 in all commands with eth1, and it should work.


1

If your system is not reporting a device wlan0 as available then the Linux kernel was unsuccessful in detecting your hardware and associating a driver to it. I would start by looking in the dmesg output for any messaging related to the Broadcom device. If it's being reported there in any way then the appropriate driver is either not present within the ...


2

If it's anywhere it would be in /var/log. But I suspect you will not find this IP address there. Copies of previous weeks log files are kept there as well, typically 4 weeks worth, as <name of log>.#. The # is an actual number such as 1 or 2, denoting how many weeks back this file is. Example Here are the first 10 from an Ubuntu 12.10 system I ...


2

man interface-order first. There is a way as well to ignore some settings that DHCP provides. Check for prepend and request options at man dhclient.conf


0

This took a while to route out but I think what you're asking is as follows. In the output of iwconfig: $ sudo iwconfig wlp3s0 IEEE 802.11bgn ESSID:"none_of_your_business_1" Mode:Managed Frequency:2.437 GHz Access Point: 00:22:3F:03:5C:67 Bit Rate=54 Mb/s Tx-Power=14 dBm Retry long limit:7 RTS thr:off ...


0

All what you have to do is to write this command: sudo hostapd -d /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf it will list you all errors, you can then correct them in hostapd.conf file sudo nano /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf


1

It turns out that the tunnel should have an IPv6 address on the source host, not the target host (the peer), for this simple ping test to work. function tunnel { local name="$1" self_ipv4="$2" self_ipv6="$3" ipv4="$4" ipv6="$5" ip tunnel add "$name" mode sit ttl 64 remote "$ipv4" local "$self_ipv4" ip -6 addr add "$self_ipv6"1 dev "$name" ip -6 ...


1

Reading the documentation and man pages leads me to believe that you should use netconf. According to its manual page, something like: netconf -a and then answering any interactive questions, likely does what you wan. You're existing configuration exists in: /etc/inet.conf It seems you can also get dhcpd to print its current view of the world with: ...


2

Channel bonding What you're talking about is channel bonding. That won't do what you're describing however. Bonding like this combines 2 NICs together so that they're combined into a unified NIC device which is then assigned a single IP address. Routing To do what you want you'd need to either do it using traditional routing rules, setting things up so ...


1

No it's not. Bonding mashes the two in to a single pseudo interface and load balances across them. What you want is sort of the opposite of bonding. It looks like what you want is more like what is discussed in this thread.


1

Why are you running wifi-menu each time you start? Unless you are constantly connecting to new wireless networks, you should simply use wifi-menu once to create a profile, then use netctl to automatically connect when you boot.


2

I have another idea which I just used for a similar purpose: Add a rule to your iptables : -A INPUT -p tcp --dport <PORT_TO_MONITOR> -m state --state NEW -j LOG --log-prefix "new_connection " --log-level 7 This will add a line to your system log for each new connection to that port. You can also redirect this to a seperate log file, I believe.


1

Let look at route scope definition in Linux: The scope of a route in Linux is an indicator of the distance to the destination network. Host A route has host scope when it leads to a destination address on the local host. Link A route has link scope when it leads to a destination address on the local network. Universe A route has universe scope ...



Top 50 recent answers are included