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0

Maybe try with "arp -a", see who is on your link... Add static route to them, one of them will be the dhcp, one the dns...Then remove the routes after..


0

-Is a new standard of shortening, a new way to indicate the location address of the host but in IPv6 as well as IPv4 in IPv6 were still wearing 127.1 Can Do use " : : 1" uses the same "the same address" being the target host will be the same, the difference is only the default IP version used to be IPv4 or IPv6 take a peek with the ping ... ping -c 4 ...


0

The net.core.wmem_default and wmem_max settings control the initial and maximum sizes of TX socket buffers in bytes. While the queue itself is just a linked list of skb pointers, the kernel also keeps track of the total byte-size consumed by the skb's as they're added and removed from the socket buffer. The wmem_default sysctl sets the default initial ...


1

That IP parameter is actually a kernel parameter, given by your bootloader. If you're seeing the kernel attempt autoconfiguration, there's either already one specified or your kernel has been built with a default to try autoconfiguration. Try removing the "ip" kernel parameter or specifying "ip=none" and see if that does what you want. That should be good ...


1

Ideally dhclient-eth0 should work but as you don't have network connection its not possible to obtain ip address via dhcp you have few work work around if you just want internet on kali make network adapter on NAT this will give you internet access You can use BRIDGE MODE and gnome-network-manager to configure it via GUI by right clicking on network ...


1

I believe that some, but not all wifi chipsets will allow 2 subinterfaces, one of them in master mode and one of them in client mode. The difficulty is that there is only one radio. The client subinterface needs to search for the SSID it wants to join and set the radio to the same channel as the access point it associates to. Master subinterfaces, on the ...


1

There's a standard custom script /sbin/ifup-local. It is called for each adapter. My script obtains the ip and hostnames and adds them to /etc/hosts #!/bin/bash # /sbin/ifup-local set -e fn_get_ip() { ip addr show dev "$1" | sed "s,.* inet \([^/]*\)/.*,\1,;t;d" } fn_aaa() { ip=`fn_get_ip "$1"` hostnames=`hostname | sed "s,\([^.]*\)\..*,\1 &,"` ...


0

Wondershaper was last edited in 2002 but it still works on Fedora 21 today. But note, there are only a couple of options available as arguments and you cannot specify the upload/download speed on the command line as specified here- at least, not in Download version 1.1a, released 16th of April 2002. You have to edit the file, and it's a shell script. Not ...


0

You don't need to do any of that. In some flavours of Linux Ehternet or Wifi internet connection isn't disabled but you need to enable it from the Network Properties. Go to the top and find the icon that has Wired or Wifi network connection icon. Right click and go to Edit Connections From there Go to the Wired dropdown and locate your eth0 Click on ...


0

Ok, I was doing wrong. To share internet over wi-fi from other connection you need to set wi-fi adapter into AP-mode. So I've used create_ap script and all is good now


5

1) You shouldn't manually update your resolv.conf, because all changes will be overwritten by data that your local DHCP server provides. If you want it to be static, run sudo dpkg-reconfigure resolvconf and answer "no" to dynamic updates. If you want to add new entries there, edit /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base and run sudo resolvconf -u, it will append ...


-1

You can get it with pfiles /proc/* Check this post for solution http://atoz-networking.blogspot.in/2014/12/how-to-get-process-id-attached-with-port.html


2

You can figure out the amount of packets received and transmitted across eth0 by running the following commands: cat /sys/class/net/eth0/statistics/rx_packets cat /sys/class/net/eth0/statistics/tx_packets You could then use this fact to write simple a shell script which will poll these files every second, and then calculate and output a PPS value (packets ...


0

The configuration file is /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0, not /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-etho. Similarly, the device name inside the configuration file must be eth0, not etho. Inside the configuration file, the words to the left of the equals signs must be ALL_CAPS. There must be no space preceding or following each equals sign. That ...


2

This will help you ip r l && ip addr show {interface name} | grep ether Ex. ip r l && ip addr show eth0 | grep ether Sample output ip r l && ip addr show wlan0 | grep ether default via 192.168.1.254 dev wlan0 proto static 192.168.1.0/24 dev wlan0 proto kernel scope link src 192.168.1.42 link/ether e4:d5:3d:ef:90:a9 brd ...


1

You are better off using ip a, but with your current output, you could use awk: awk ' BEGIN { RS="\n\n"} /eth0/ && /UP/ {ifc=$1; ip=$6; subn=$8; gway=$10; mac=$12} END {print "Interface: "ifc "\nIP: "ip "\nSubnet: "subn "\nGateway: "gway "\nMac: "mac} ' <(ifconfig -a) Interface: eth0: IP: 192.168.0.154 Subnet: 255.255.255.0 Gateway: ...


3

The "traditional" way was (is) to have a user account information locally, i.e in /etc/password, /etc/group etc. But that is not easy to manage when users freely access other computers on the network and/or have their home-directory on some networked drive. For the latter setup it is more easy to have user account information (incl password) in an LDAP ...


2

The section you should ignore is the Configure Network Address Translation section. In fact if you want to guarantee that wireless clients can't go onto the Ethernet connection do the following: Run sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf. Scroll to the bottom and add net.ipv4.ip_forward=0 on a new line. Save the file. This will disable ip forwarding on boot up. Run: ...


2

You can parse the output of ifconfig. This works on many unix variants. ifconfig -a | sed -n 's/^\([[:alnum:]]*\):.*/\1/p' If you don't mind being strictly Linux-only, you can use the simpler command ls /sys/class/net/ If you don't want to list interfaces that are down, use ifconfig instead of ifconfig -a. With /sys, it's more obscure: you need to ...


0

I have the same problem. Have temporarily solved it by filtering the outgoing traffic to the ip in question, by typing in the following command: sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -d <ip-adress>/24 -j DROP sudo iptables-save The "/24" means it only cares about the first three numbers in the ip-adress. The problem is that it keeps coming back with new ...


2

One way could be to use ifconfig with -s (short list), and cut out the part you need: $ ifconfig -a -s Iface MTU Met RX-OK RX-ERR RX-DRP RX-OVR TX-OK TX-ERR TX-DRP TX-OVR Flg eth0 1500 0 1374267176 0 116420 0 2848281091 0 0 0 BMRU lo 65536 0 761767047 0 0 0 761767047 0 0 0 LRU ...


1

tcpdump shows you what the interface sees. Obviously packets have to arrive at the interface first before Netfilter (iptables) can kill them. Thus iptables can never prevent you from seeing incoming traffic. It can just prevent this traffic from having an effect (besides wasting your bandwidth...). But there should not be any outgoing packets any more. ...


1

lsof -p 1028 filters for process ID 1028. You should try: # lsof -Pnl +M -i4 for a list of open IPv4 ports and their owning processes. The -Pnl is optional, but makes it slightly quicker as it doesn't do name lookups etc for you. Or: # lsof -i :1028 to list everything listening on port 1028. If there is something strange going on, then you need to ...


1

Indeed, there are keyservers that listen on port 80. One such keyserver is hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80. Indeed, pacman-key uses gpg under the hood. You might have tried specifying a keyserver by passing the --keyserver argument to pacman-key. This didn't work for me. You might have tried specifying a keyserver by creating or altering ...


1

Yes, given the following config: .-----------. .-----------. | Switch1 | | Switch2 | '-=-------=-' '-=-------=-' | | | | | | | | .-=----.--=---.---=--.----=-. | eth0 | eth1 | eth2 | eth3 | |---------------------------| | bond0 | '---------------------------' Where each switch has its ...


0

Setting net.ipv4.ip_forward to zero should prevent access your LAN network from any device behind the eth1. But you can't prevent anyone who accessed your box, if he has root access. Use iptables filter table and input or output chain to prevent non-root users who accessed the box from accessing you lan.


2

The error (post-stop) in your log seems related to this (in /etc/init/networking.conf line 25ff.): post-stop script if [ -z "$UPSTART_STOP_EVENTS" ]; then echo "Stopping or restarting the networking job is not supported." echo "Use ifdown & ifup to reconfigure desired interface." exit 100 fi You get the exit code, but ...


0

The first thing you want to do is to create a udev rule which corresponds to the NIC you're plugging in and out. plug in NIC udevinfo -a -p /sys/class/net/yourdeviceskernelname Make the udev rule match the output of above: sudo nano /etc/udev/rules.d/10-usb-nicKERNEL=="yourdev*", ATTR{address}=="11:22:33:44:55:66", NAME="usb" Then create a ...


0

Since you're using a newer version of udev, you should be fine like when you turn on or off the wireless switch on your laptop. If you want a script to be run automatically when you plug it in or out then you need to add a udev rule to /etc/udev/rules.d


1

I did multiple checks and it seems that the kernel allocates a quite large RCVBUF (receive buffer) of around 1-4MB. Not by default it doesn't. The size is per socket; HTTP relationships may involve multiple sockets. There is no system maximum as far as I am aware, except in so far as there's a (pretty high) maximum number of sockets. From man 7 ...


1

With just the right help from the comments and a very simple Google search I was able to find a solution and it was even in the original site for Raspberry :) If anyone else ever wonders about the same thing, the solution that worked for me can be found here. It turned out pretty basic, fundamental stuff. TL;DR: disabling the hotplug for the ethernet ...


0

This appears to work: # VBoxManage hostonlyif remove vboxnet0 This removes the host-only network. Then restarting VirtualBox brought the interface back and it works. For now. Honestly, I don't know if I've actually found the solution or if it's just dumb luck and it will stop working in a few minutes.


1

Any advanced routing such as setting multiple default gateways will involve policy based routing. There are multiple solutions that have been posted for forwarding based on marking packets destined for a particular port. The solution I found on Red Hat's customer portal turned out to be much easier and will likely cover any issue people will have on ...


1

To check if a port is not already binding using netcat : $ nc -zw2 <IP> <PORT> && echo "already binding" || echo "Not already binding" Reminder, users can only use ports > 1024 and < 65536


0

This is a workaround for now. I keep this script alive by supervisor: #!/bin/bash is_cable_plugged() { if [ "`ifconfig eth0|sed -n '/running/I p'`" == '' ];then echo no;else echo yes;fi } while true; do if [[ "$(is_cable_plugged)" == "no" ]]; then while true; do if [[ "$(is_cable_plugged)" == "yes" ]]; then ...


0

The problem is with the static build, as @slm mentioned. I've compiled ffmpeg from source and things work fine now.


0

I search for an hour and finally try debian network packages and it worked! So i put here if someone had same problem can fix it. Download this debian network packages and install in Kali(dpkg -i package.deb) then reboot.


0

I'm not sure if this is the same problem I had or not, but I recently upgraded and old internal DNS server system from OpenBSD 3.8 to 5.6, and I lost the ability to resolve hosts with ping, but the host command was working. Turned out I had to add 127.0.0.1/8 to the match-clients directive in named in addition to the 192.168.0.0/16 which I already had there, ...


0

About the only thing you can do is verify that the hardware on your end isn't the source of the potentially faulty hardware. As it states in that quote: ...often indicate broken hardware somewhere in the ping packet's path... So any piece or hardware or wiring could be faulty between you and the destination. So this would mean there could be a faulty ...


1

There is a typo in your config: auto eht1 It should be instead: auto eth1 So the interface just is not autoenabled. You can still see it with ifconfig eth1 and bring it up with ifconfig eth1 up


0

Sometimes if you reboot your computer, the computer don't see the new settings of interfaces. (I don't know why.) But if you "reboot" the eth1 with ifdown eth1 and after that ifup eth1.


0

Well, I didn't find a way to do it without adding extra scripts, but this is the easiest way I could do it. First add these lines to your *.conf file (make sure the up.sh and down.sh files have 755 permissions): script-security 2 # Run when Connection is up up /etc/openvpn/up.sh # Run when connection is down down /etc/openvpn/down.sh here is the contents ...


1

Here is their documentation on interface creation, titled: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3: Reference Guide - Chapter 8. Network Interfaces. Add this line if it does not exist to /etc/hosts 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain run the following commands as root # ifconfig lo 127.0.0.1 # route add 127.0.0.1 Test the interface # ifconfig lo ...


0

Can't comment on the thread above because my rep is too low, but, the question was, "Why does telnet work, and nc not?" I suspect what's happening here is that telnet converts to Windows style line breaks, CRLN, and nc doesn't. You can convert it by running the command like this: | sed -e "s/$/\r/" | nc localhost 3333 Or you should be able to get it to ...


0

Besides tsocks — which still AFAICT requires you to launch programs with the correct environment to work — you should check out tun2socks. With it you set up a TUN interface (i.e. a new network interface, just like a VPN would create) and any packets sent there get proxied to your SOCKS5 server. You then set up your system routes to actually send the traffic ...


0

Monitoring Internet Traffic in Switched Networks These days, the majority of local networks are switch-based. Unlike a hub, a switch, when it has received a packet from some port, retransmits it only to one port, where the recipient computer is connected to it. Switches maintain a table of MAC addresses and ports associated with each of those addresses ...


0

Assuming the bridge is working[1], you have the two devices connected together at layer two (MAC layer); are both sides on the same layer three (IP) network? Can you describe how "the user application [is] connected to tap0"? (I'm assuming the router in GNS3 is attached to tap1 via a "cloud".) @Celada, Mac OS X networking is the same as FreeBSD, on which ...


3

::1 is the ipv6 version of 127.0.0.1


2

The address ::1 (or 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 with all fields written out) is an IP version 6 address and specifies the loopback address in host scope. So technically, it is the same as the IP version 4 address 127.0.0.1.



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