New answers tagged

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According to wireless.wiki.kernel , there are two way to get the wifi working: 1) Compile a new kernel version at least the 4.0 or 2) Using backport It is possible to use newer ath10k driver on an older kernel with backports project. Download latest backports release from here and unpack it. Run defconfig for ath10k: make defconfig-ath10k ...


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You can set iptables rules to block incoming traffic on port 7777 iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 7777 -j REJECT If you don't want the outside user from getting an ICMP response then you can DROP instead: iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 7777 -j DROP


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Open /etc/resolv.conf and check that it contains a valid DNS server (e.g. google): nameserver 8.8.8.8 Normally when modified you won't need to restart the network manager, as it will detect and apply the changes.


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In particular, the HostName line is what allows ssh <instance>.<location>.<project>? Yes. If your ssh config has a HostName <ip address> line for a particular Host somealias stanza, then DNS is not used when you ssh somealias. Note that it is also possible to specify a FQDN for the HostName Host abc HostName alpha.beta....


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Some of ISP's use Private IP address space to route traffic inside their networks. Then they filter private IP addresses on the network borders. That's why you can't see routers inside those networks if you are outside them. It often is used with MPLS technology.


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Yes, your question is ambiguous. You do not say from where you are issuing the trace, or which IP your are tracing. But I think that you are saying that you are logged into the server, and you are tracing a SSH user's IP address, who is logged into the same server. Then yes, you will receive the route from your server to that user's IP address. But the ...


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I had a similar issue with an IAX2 trunk in a Pacemaker HA setup. The solution is not to disable the primary IP address of the NIC, but rather to source all traffic from the virtual IP address. There is even a pacemaker resource agent just for this. The ocf:heartbeat:IPsrcaddr. For example I have a virtual (secondary) IP of 192.168.5.4. This IP floats ...


3

When you trace route from the server via ssh or to the user logged on the server via ssh, you trace the server, because it's responsive to the connection created. You have no way to know the IP of a person connected on SSH, nor even whether there is a person connected on SSH. Cheers,


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These are virtual devices, they do not have their own configuration files in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ but are defined in the main configuration file, something along the lines of this: iface eth0:1 inet static address 192.168.4.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 You can delete the interface using ip link delete eth0.1 assuming you want to delete ...


2

You can try digging into man traceroute, there is explanation of asterisked hosts in traceroute output. It basically means that router either not sending ICMP "time exceeded" (due to firewall rules, some specific software, etc.) or TTL of packet is too small and can't get back to you. I guess blocking some types of ICMP packets can be part of security ...


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tcp[tcpflags] is a variable storing the TCP flags (bits) on currently captured TCP packet. tcp-syn is a constant with zeroes everywhere except the bit corresponding to TCP SYN packet. Thus: tcpdump dst port 1194 and "(tcp-syn) != 0" is equivalent to tcpdump dst port 1194 and 1 = 1 UDP protocol is simpler and doesn't have these flags - there is no SYN, ...


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Asside from setting up routing on the DMZ machine and adding two interfaces mapped to direct and local. It should be just a matter of setting up DNAT on the DMZ. All machines connecting through the DMZ would need their interface as: <interface type='network'> <source network='local'/> <!-- Other stuff --> </interface>


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Pinging with a larger packet than the path MTU worked because you didn't give ping options to prevent it from sending IP fragments. With the ping I have installed and my 1500-byte MTU it'd be: ping -M do -s 1472 8.8.8.8 works, whereas ping -M do -s 1473 8.8.8.8 gives an error. The -M do option prohibits fragmentation.


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Gilles appears to have answered this one in the comments, with: Are you running NetworkManager or Wicd? as followed up by the OP: Wicd was running.


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I think it would work properly if you add the dns-namservers to your eth0 aswell, or by configuring your dhcp server/router to give the resolvers you want , while making sure in the first place that you can ping those adresses


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In my case it was an issue of the configuration file /etc/dhcpcd.conf. It had an entry static domain_name_servers=192.168.1.1 and whenever the Ethernet was connected, resolvconf overwrote the nameserver in /etc/resolv.conf, breaking Internet access via domain names.


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Change the onboot value to yes, indicating this device should be activated as boot time. onboot=no to onboot=yes This device should be activated at boot-time


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I was having this issue as well and ended up switching to the text-based user interface, nmtui, instead.


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I have a answer, though you wont like it. Multiple RR A in DNS wont get you high availability. The answer is highly dependent on the client/their DNS server. If the client solves the IP address of the ISP that is down, it will keep it on cache, and wont try the other, so you will have a set of clients having access, and others complaining the site is ...


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If you don't want to get into real routing protocols, the best suggestion is a continuously running program that pings the two first hops (with your made up addresses, that'd be 161.0.0.1 and 171.0.0.1) regularly and installs whichever is responding as the default route. You could probably do this in your choice of scripting languages, although I'd probably ...


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I think below is needed: ip ru add from 192.168.0.2 table 3 prio 300 ip ro add table 3 default via 192.168.0.1 dev wlan0


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When you have the machine working as a hotspot and dhcpd working, you just need to make work as a router - my recommandation is to try finding a guide to setup the version of Fedora you use as a router. It basically comes down to: enable ip forwarding set up routing set up masquerading allow the traffic in whatever firewall you use. I've never used ...


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The IP 169.254.169.254 is in the network block 168.254.0.0/16 allocated for Automatic Private IP Addressing. It should never be routed to the internet. If your IP address is in the block you will not have direct connectivity to the internet. However, you may be able to use a proxy to connect to sites on the internet. There are a number of mechanisms ...


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There are a few things to point out about your question's content which should answer you: An IP address does not generate a DNS lookup. It simply generates a connection request that gets routed. The existence of a proxy server on any system does not in itself decide what happens with the traffic. What does is the routing table and firewall rules. The ...


1

If you are sending very small quantities of data at a time then it could happen: For every transmit you will receive an ack, possibly with zero byte payload. For every receive you will transmit an ack, possibly with zero byte payload. For every new connection you will transmit/receive a syn, a syn/ack, and an ack. (probably all with zero payload) There ...


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This is a slightly more robust way of retrieving the HostName based on Host in the .ssh/config file. sshalias() { awk "\$1==\"Host\" {host=\$2} \$1==\"HostName\" && host==\"$1\" {print \$2}" "$HOME/.ssh/config" }


1

For anyone who comes across this one another good answer is here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3130911/tcpdump-localhost-to-localhost, if the traffic that isn't showing up is localhost->localhost traffic. I feel like in other situations I haven't had to do that, but at least a few times I've had to.


1

You should have correct device name. So change your interface name - if you've changed it to eth0 during installation - to enp5s0 in: /usr/lib/systemd/system/dhcpcd@.service Then you'll be able to enable it. You can bring your interface up by running : ip link set dev enp5s0 up and then obtain an IP from DHCP by running : dhcpcd enp5s0 you can also ...


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Looks like you configured your client to push all the traffic through VPN, so you lost connection to the server after that. Check your client configuration


0

A host-only adapter in VirtualBox is almost exactly what it sounds like: the "host" is the box where you run virtualbox at - so most probably the desktop system your display, mouse and keyboard are connected to. "host-only" refers to the circumstance that (out of the box) only your host and your vm are connected to this network via a network bridge on the ...


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I think this will work: ip route add 10.1.1.1/32 dev eth0 So when you ping 10.1.1.1 it will route via eth0.


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Based on This page from XYMon regarding Clients not reporting I figured it out. While it gives the problem, I couldn't get the solutions there to work. On Client : cat /etc/default/xymon-client | grep CLIENTHOSTNAME Must Match on Server : /etc/xymon/hosts.cfg 1.2.3.4 CLIENTHOSTNAME If it doesn't match EXACTLY then >> "Xymon only cares about the ...


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I'm having this issue too. Here are some outputs from the above commands # netstat -taupen | grep LISTEN tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:139 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 0 19239 2490/smbd tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:10000 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 0 19149 2475/perl tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:22 ...


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Inherent limitations The issue could be variable (e.g. congested link to ISP or congestion within ISP). It could also be horrible ("firewall" or even "anti-virus" doing deep packet inspection); the tools below might not show any problem at all. They're worth having, but there is a limit to how much you can achieve just typing commands into a terminal. 2 ...


1

Apparently the problem is that by default, you can only have one default gateway on a system. The case described would lead to asynchronous routing. Solution The iproute2 program, which is included in all current Linux distributions and already installed even, as a rule, can be used for the solution of this problem. Normally, a Linux system only has one ...


0

Just to Expand on Gilles correct Answer : From TheKelleys.org DNSMasq Man-Page -A, --address=/<domain>/[domain/][<ipaddr>] Specify an IP address to return for any host in the given domains. Queries in the domains are never forwarded and always replied to with the specified IP address which may be IPv4 or IPv6. To give both IPv4 and IPv6 ...


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Found it. In a similar case, the author complained that: I have to wait for about 20 seconds until my network comes up. It appeared that: This delay is caused by Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) Indeed, one of the differences was that the /etc/network/interfaces of Debian host contained bridge_stp on, while on Ubuntu, there was no bridge_stp ...


0

If I'm interpreting this right, you want to find out if a particular ipv6 address (google.com's) is contained within a routing table entry (network/netmask), and print the route if it is. If so, then: Acquire google.com's ipv6 address, e.g. with host -t aaaa Get a list of all ipv6 routes. e.g. with ip -6 route show. or query your routing daemon for a ...


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If you already have setup the bond in Active-Backup (bond mode 1) on the system you need only to move the nic2 cable to the other switch port. When the current active Ethernet port going down (ex. nic1) the system will automatically use the nic2. You can always check the bond current active inteface with: cat /proc/net/bonding/bond0


0

Haven't done this in a long time... take my answer with a grain of salt. The filter parent might have to be the PRIO qdisc itself (so you have HTB filters, and PRIO filters, ...). Otherwise PRIO might reclassify packets by itself according to priomap. This is what it looked like in an old script of mine (FairNAT, you can find the whole thing on GitHub) and ...


0

Each interface is supposed to have different IP addresses as they are different networks, unless you issue configurations to bridge them; in normal conditions they cannot both belong to 192.168.2.0/24. So I do advise creating a br0 (bridge interface), that will represent both interfaces, and giving only a single address to that virtual interface; in that ...


2

The most common reason why you get a bogus IP address for a nonexistent domain is that your ISP converts negative answers into the address of their ad servers, to serve you more ads when you make a typo in the address of a website. This is definitely a shady practice, but unfortunately some ISPs do it. You can commonly counter that by using different ...


2

You can use either host or nslookup from bind-tools: $ host 172.217.19.195 195.19.217.172.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer fra02s21-in-f3.1e100.net. $ nslookup 172.217.19.195 Server: 192.168.2.1 Address: 192.168.2.1#53 Non-authoritative answer: 195.19.217.172.in-addr.arpa name = fra02s21-in-f3.1e100.net.


1

The host utility will return a string containing the resolved host name: $ host 8.8.8.8 8.8.8.8.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer google-public-dns-a.google.com. This ought to be fairly easy to parse in any shell script. If the host name lookup fails, host exits with a non-zero exit status: $ if ! host 8.8.8.1 2>/dev/null; then echo "lookup failed"; ...


0

I had an entry for my domain that was address=/domain.com/192.168.1.7 (my NginX reverse Proxy) It was causing all non-existent subdomains like acoimasdin.domain.com to resolve to 192.169.1.7. Since I already have everything set up to forward domain.com to www.domain.com in apache, I made the entry address=/www.domain.com/192.168.1.7 Now my remote sub-...


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172, 192 and 10 are the IPv4 first-octets used for private networks. The standard specifies ranges of values for the second octet. For 172, that's 16 through 31. The usual practice for /etc/hosts is to provide a loopback address, which is apparently your 172 address. If you have both IPv4 and IPv6 configured, a separate address/hostname is needed for ...


1

first rule syntactically correct second rule logically true third rule depends on your distro. I'd expect an entry for localhost and possibly for the system's hostname. localhost may be an ipv6 entry (::1) in which case there may be an additional entry for ipv4-localhost What you should you put in the hosts file is any IP address to domain name ...


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And that's impossible. A short google would have told you that the NIC isn't passed through, and that the only virtual interface your Kali VM is ever going to see is wired.


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No. Read: /dev/tcp listen instead of nc listen. Without further information, you could use the system version of perl, which is an essential package in Debian. Write a single-file perl script. You can almost certainly find a way to execute a single-file script without it existing as an application on the target system, e.g. curl https://dropbox.com/.../...


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For redirecting DNS UDP based requests, if your DNS daemon/proxy is listening in port 5353/UDP, you have to do: iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp -m udp --dport 53 -j DNAT --to-destination 127.0.0.1:5353 The source has to be the internal netblock/network(s) used as we do not need loops (i.e. we still may need to do DNS requests to the ...



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