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0

You need to enable routing with echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/forwarding. Then in addition you need to set up the appropriate routes on other machines. So on 192.168.15.100 you need to say something like ip route add 192.168.200.0/24 via 192.168.15.x (where x is whatever the forwarding machine's IP address is). Similarly, you will need to add a ...


0

I managed to solve this myself with some time and effort so ill post my solution here in hopes that it will save someone some time in the future. ssh -o ProxyCommand="nc -X connect -x '<proxy ip>:<proxy port>' %h %p" root@<remote ip> This is the command that im now using to SSH onto my server through my proxy. If you wish to use the same ...


0

My understanding is that the netmask of the interface tells what subnet the interface belongs to. It looks like you think a netmask is something that is arbitrarily applied to an interface so that it can freely choose to which network communicate. Actually it's not. A network address (e.g. 10.0.7.0) and a netmask (e.g. 255.255.255.0 i.e. /24 in ...


0

Look at the keepcache parameter. I believe that it goes in /etc/dnf/dnf.conf and should read keepcache=1 or keepcache="true"


0

First of all, a primary network interface on Linux can't be configured with /32. From the host point of view, the netmask defines the scope of the subnet the host is in. With it the host knows when to send the packet to another host directly or through the default gateway. The interface needs to send and receive broadcast, because without it ARP won't ...


3

Rather than roll your own and have to cope with everything that can go wrong (host not responding, host stopping responding in the middle, user pressing Ctrl+C, error reporting, …), use one of the many existing tools to run a command on many machines over SSH. mussh -t 4 -H <(printf '%s\n' "${HOSTS[@]}") -c 'uname -a' pssh -t 4 -h <(printf '%s\n' ...


0

so, you basically are trying to have four addresses of the same ip-net on the same vlan route traffic over interfaces with similar ip-adresses on the remote net to the remote interfaces with just these similar addresses? I've never heard of a solution like yours, but i'm out of the network business for a long time now. So just to give you an idea: Why ...


0

I've been pleased with symon, which collects data about network interface usage (as well as other metrics like CPU and memory usage) and displays them in a web interface. Here's an example showing traffic for one network interface for the past week: Symon makes it very easy to monitor multiple network interfaces. Your situation might look like this: ...


0

-This happens it is perfectly normal because you are making changes "even if in a virtual device" of the same physical address, the connection drops ... if you want to make the change MAC and still have connection should make the change before connect, because unfortunately this is it.


2

A typical way to do this is to use the trap command to tell the shell script to ignore SIGINT (generated by Control-C), and then to re-enable SIGINT in a subshell just before your command is run. trap "" INT HOSTS=(MACHINE1 MACHINE2 MACHINE3 MACHINE4 MACHINE5) for i in "${HOSTS[@]}" do echo "$i" (trap - INT; ssh -q "$i" "uname -a") done


1

The solution was to just add 10.2.0.1 as a DNS server on the host and to add the following lines to /etc/dnsmasq.conf: address=/host.local/10.2.0.1 address=/host.local/<ipv6 address>


5

If I understand your problem correctly, you want to ping your computer from another computer. The ping 1.2.3.4 works but the ping hostname doesn't. What I suspect the situation being is that your computer doesn't have a its hostname registered in DNS that is discoverable by the other machine. If the hostname is not known to the other machine it does not ...


4

I am guessing you don't have your own DNS server. Computers understand IP addresses but not the name of your computer. To make it so, you need to either add a record in your hosts file, which can be found in /etc/hosts, or have a DNS entry on your DNS server. Then it will know what you mean by the hostname of your machine.


0

Oh I guess it is not running when one server is your local PC. I tried on server to server test, it runs fine.


0

If you are using Kali Linux just type NetworkManager, this command will bring the interface back.


0

As it turns out, there is an FAQ question on the Octprint/Octopi FAQ that addresses this very same question, and there's plenty of detail too (reprinted below). I can't reach my OctoPi under octopi.local under Windows, why? The third post has some good details about this issue: Octoprint discussion I can't reach my OctoPi under octopi.local under ...


2

DISCLAIMER: I don't know how dependent this answer is on specific hardware. airmon-ng will enable a monitor interface without disrupting your wifi connection. Install aircrack-ng then run something like (I'm assuming wlan0 here): sudo airmon-ng start wlan0 Which will typically create a mon0 interface to the same physical card. You can also try to do it ...


0

Falling back to 3.14.42-1.el6xen.x86_64 solved problem... # sysctl -a | grep net.bridge net.bridge.bridge-nf-call-arptables = 0 net.bridge.bridge-nf-call-ip6tables = 0 net.bridge.bridge-nf-call-iptables = 0


0

Avahi doesn't support .local domains, so you'll have to use a different name if you want to use DNS from another host. the .local should work on the Pi itself though I expect.


-1

No, DNS is not designed to do this. However, if you are testing you could use /etc/hosts and hard code several test domain names to specific IP addresses and then give each user the test domain names that you want them to use. eg. /etc/hosts IP address1 hosta.test2 IP address2 hostb.test2 IP address3 hosta.test3 IP address4 hostb.test3 ...


3

“Is it…” Well, yes. “How,” is where it gets complicated. Basically, you've got two real options that I can think of. Assuming that you're using Gnu libc, and you have nsswitch support (I vaguely recall that some distribution(s) may have disabled that?), one option might be to replace the “normal” NSS DNS module (ie, /lib64/libnss_dns*) with a custom ...


1

The DNS server settings are defined for the machine, not for the user. The gethostbyname*() syscall family tries to lookup a given hostname and return an IP-address. The first place is normally the /etc/hosts file. Then they do a lookup via the DNS-servers set in /etc/resolv.conf.


0

I think the problem is with your quotes on line 11 of /etc/default/hostapd: ”/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf” Which should read: "/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf" Your post actually helped me solve my problem, so thanks!


0

Theoretically, it's possible to include the firmware on a separate device (like a USB key) during installation, but I've tried that about a dozen times on at least 5 different laptops across the last 3 Debian releases and never gotten it to work. Instead, I usually just use the unofficial non-free net install image. If you know ahead of time what non-free ...


1

Yes, it is possible, but it is also very bad practice. You would be running only a single name server instance (e.g. BIND server); you would simply define the glue records for both nameservers to resolve to the same IP.


2

Short answer: No, one cannot configure it that way. Iptables is part of the kernel and only takes a limited number of options. It's possible only to add additional information to the output, e.g. sequence numbers and message prefixes. Dropping information is not possible. One possibility would be to use rsyslog to process the logging output. There are ...


0

Whenever a network interface goes up or down, scripts in /etc/network/*.d are executed. So for example you could make /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/10proxy a symbolic link whose target gets changed by a script in /etc/network/if-up.d. These scripts get a few environment variables, in particular IFACE with the interface name; you can use ifconfig, route, ip, etc. to ...


2

I suggest pacproxy if you are familier with Ruby. After installation, you can use like as follows. $ bundle exec pacproxy -P ~/proxy.pac -p 3128 $ export $PROXY=localhost:3128


4

You do not need a gateway entry for any NIC that you don't want to use to reach a network not in its collision domain (192.168/16 in this case). You can just omit that line if you don't want a gateway for that NIC. I'm not sure what will happen if you try to use loopback as a gateway, but I wouldn't expect it to be happy times.


2

/proc/net/dev contains statistics about network interfaces, while /proc/<pid>/net/dev contains statistics about network interfaces from the process' point of view. I suppose that if a process runs on a network namespace (see man ip-netns) where it has access only to a limited set of interfaces, only these will show up in /proc/<pid>/net/dev.


2

You cannot ping a normal NIC because NIC alone does not send any replies. Only a running computer is able send replies Normal network interface cards do not send any replies by themselves. They always need a running software on the computer to do so. When the CPU of the computer is powered down then there is no running software which would send a reply to ...


0

Do other network functions work?  Try to telnet from one machine to the other.  If you can successfully connect as root, and not as non-root, you have a problem.  Even if you get "Connection refused" (or something similar) as root and "Permission denied" (or something similar) as non-root, you have a problem. TL;DR If other network functions work as ...


0

To answer the title question: remote install with aptitude in a terminal. I use aptitude for all my local package-management because it's excellent. Powerful search, nice UI for managing dependencies. Lets you get a set of purges, upgrades, and installs lined up, and see what's going to happen before it happens. To manage the set of packages installed on ...


1

The best thing to do would be as follows: 1- Write a bash script *.sh file with the installation commands 2- Use the scp command to copy the *.sh script along with any binary files needed to the target machine 3- Connect using ssh to the target machine and run the *.sh script Note: if you haven't used ssh before, you might have to install the ...


1

I recommend you to introduce configuration management software like Ansible, Chef, CFEngine, etc. See also this Wikipedia article.


0

How about using strace itself? strace -f -e trace=network -o output_file -s 10000 somecommand -args


0

EDIT: After a small troubleshooting session with OP I'm modifying the answer to remove the quotes for "biosdevname" Edit the following lines in /etc/default/grub: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" To: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=biosdevname=0 GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=biosdevname=0 Next, run sudo update-grub and then reboot. After this, you ...


0

A quick search revealed this "A very detailed guide on how to setup VPN on Kali Linux and Ubuntu" http://www.blackmoreops.com/2015/03/01/setup-vpn-on-kali-linux/


2

The above iptables config will only let TCP and UDP packets get past the firewall (unless they came from loopback). The default rule of the INPUT chain has been set to DROP, meaning that every packet that isn't explicitly ACCEPTed will be discarded. There should be no weird packets from loopback, so only TCP/UDP packets are allowed in. There is one major ...


2

I'm not aware of any method to override the system resolvers simply by using environment variables. You can override resolv.conf options using RES* environment variables but those can't be used to override the nameserver definitions (see the resolv.conf manual page for more information). The best option would be to use the LD_PRELOAD mechanism of the ...


0

I think this official guide will help you. http://www.tataindicom.com/download/dialers/dialup-internet-on-linux.pdf


3

resolv.conf allows you to specify searchdomains. An entry like the following: search cse.iitb.ac.in it.iitb.ac.in iitb.ac.in Allows me to: $ ping -c1 www PING www.cse.iitb.ac.in (10.105.1.3) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from cse.iitb.ac.in (10.105.1.3): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.803 ms --- www.cse.iitb.ac.in ping statistics --- 1 packets transmitted, ...


1

The first part of your question asks for recursive definitions in /etc/hosts. This is not necessary as it is already possible to specify multiple hostnames there: 69.162.80.52 pyrrha.compsci.university.org pyrrha Please read the manual page (man 5 hosts) for the syntax of the hosts file. The second part of your question is a duplicate of IPv6 Zone ID in ...


2

My particular problem turned out to be ifplugd. It failed with a NLAPI: Packet too small or truncated error everytime I plugged my ethernet cable in or out. Seems like some change in Kernel 3.9 introduced something. So I recompiled ifplugd with a change to the buffer size in src/nlapi.c line 74. -- char replybuf[1024]; ++ char replybuf[8*1024]; Now it ...


2

Yes, you can add a (i)PXE Launcher to Grub. For dpkg-based systems like Debian&derivatives: Only apt-get install ipxe is required I would expect other distros to have integrated it as well fairly comfortably. ==> A "PXE Boot" menu entry will exist on next reboot. In case you want to know inner-working-details: The post-install hook scripts ...


0

I posted this question to the Centos 6 Networking forum and the response there was that using HWADDR is the only supported method (at least for NetworkManager). They suggested that I generate the ifcfg-device files with the exact MAC address before the network comes up. That would be straightforward using a init script.


0

Have a look at ifplugd: ifplugd is a Linux daemon which will automatically configure your ethernet device when a cable is plugged in and automatically unconfigure it if the cable is pulled. This is useful on laptops with onboard network adapters, since it will only configure the interface when a cable is really connected. ifplugd ifplugd ...


4

If you specify allow-hotplug eth0 instead of auto eth0 in /etc/network/interfaces, then the connection will only be initiated by udev when something triggers it, instead of at every boot. Hopefully that will be when another device is connected to the other end of your cable...


0

There are always more than one solution to the problem. If you are with this machine always in one place, like home, then the easiest way would be getting rid of dhcp-client package, and set static IP address, mask, gateway. Supposing you don't need it, you would do something like apt-get remove isc-dhcp-client This will tell you first, if there are any ...



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