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43

Looking at the RFC for TCP: RFC 793 - Transmission Control Protocol, the answer would seem to be no because of the fact that a TCP header is limited to 16-bits for the source/destination port field.      Does IPv6 improve things? No. Even though IPv6 will give us a much larger IP address space, 32-bit vs. 128-bits, it makes no attempt ...


24

You can use SSHFS to mount a remote home in a local folder. Has the advantage of using the current infrastructure and low latency of local vim.


23

Apart from not getting detailed information about your test setup the main problem seems to be, that you use a message size of 64 byte. This is far away from the usual MTU of 1500 bytes and makes UDP highly inefficient: while TCP merges multiple sends into a single packet on the wire (except if TCP_NODELAY is set) to make efficient use of the link, each UDP ...


17

From man 1 traceroute: -m max_ttl Specifies the maximum number of hops (max time-to-live value) traceroute will probe. The default is 30.


16

You can edit remotely with a local vim or gvim. :e scp://me@someplace.else/~/myfiles/whatever.file scp is a secure copy protocol. It authenticates the same way as ssh, so your ssh key needs to be available, etc. There are various other protocols supported (see :help netrw-externapp) but scp is probably the easiest if you are already using ssh to the ...


15

NOTES NIC device handles The examples below assume that the network interface is a wireless card named wlan0. Adjust this bit in the examples for your particular situation. For example if it's a wired NIC card, then it's likely eth0. IPv4 - (Internet Protocol version 4) Also these examples are returning the IPv4 address. the "dotted quad" that most ...


12

I wrote a program a while ago that does this: tzupdate. You can see what it would set your timezone to (without actually setting it) by running tzupdate -p: $ tzupdate -p Europe/Malta You can set it for real by running tzupdate as root. $ sudo tzupdate Europe/Malta $ date Thu 12 Sep 05:52:22 CEST 2013 This works by: Geolocating your current IP ...


12

Some (but not all) reasons: In order to host multiple SSL sites as already mentioned Because you may be consolidating services from multiple hosts and you need to preserve the addresses In order to use an IP address that can later be transferred to another host To compensate for a host that's down at that moment by adding its IP address to another one If ...


11

Sure. You can create a tap device fairly easily, either with tunctl (from uml-utilities, at least on Debian): # tunctl -t eth0 Set 'eth0' persistent and owned by uid 0 # ifconfig eth0 eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr a6:9b:fe:d8:d9:5e BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 ...


11

The kernel lists them by name in /sys, both separately in (e.g.) the tree of PCI devices -- although finding them there if you don't know where they are to start with is not simple -- and together via symlinks in /sys/class/net. E.g.: > ls /sys/class/net em1 lo wlp6so Another example: > ls /sys/class/net lo p6s1 wlan0 If you are not sure which is ...


10

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


10

ifconfig is from net-tools, which stopped being developed in '99, though some distros still patch it internally. It also still uses ioctl for network configuration, which is an ugly and less powerful way of interacting with the kernel. A lot of changes in Linux networking code, and a lot of new features aren't accessible using net-tools: multipath routing, ...


9

The symptoms are consistent with an IP address conflict. An IP address conflict arises when your machine and some other machine on the same network are trying to use the same IP address. On a local link network, addressing is based on MAC addresses. Every Ethernet card has its own MAC address (barring gross misconfiguration or malice). A router deciding ...


9

Special (and AFAICT) slightly under-documented behaviour in iputils ping: you ping yourself. If you ping 0 this is what happens (heavily edited and commented for clarity): if (inet_aton(target, &whereto.sin_addr)) == 1) { // convert string to binary in_addr } // inet_aton returns 1 (success) and leaves the `in_addr` contents all zero. if ...


9

When some location is further than 30 hops, it probably means simply that last hops does not replies when TTL exceeds. Unless, it's a story: $ traceroute -m100 216.81.59.173 traceroute to 216.81.59.173 (216.81.59.173), 100 hops max, 52 byte packets (...) 14 episode.iv (206.214.251.1) 173.387 ms 171.638 ms 171.201 ms 15 a.new.hope (206.214.251.6) ...


8

You can add the calls to the post-up hook when the interface comes up. The interface configuration sits in /etc/network/interfaces. Here an example: auto eth1 iface eth1 inet dhcp post-up route del -net 10.1.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 post-up route add -host 10.1.2.51 eth1 post-up route add -host 10.1.2.52 eth1 pre-down route add -net 10.1.2.0 ...


8

You might have better luck using the tool arping instead. The tool ping works at the layer 3 level of the OSI model, whereas arping works at layer 2. You still need to know the IP of the system however with this tool. There are 2 versions of it, the standard one included with most Unixes (Alexey Kuznetsov's) is the version that can only deal with IP ...


8

Those are TCP connections that were used to make an outgoing connection to a website. You can tell from the trailing :80 which is the port that's used for HTTP connections to web servers, typically. After the 3 way TCP connection handshake has completed the connections are left in a "wait to close" state. This bit is your local system's IP address and ...


8

That's how the ping command works. You can control it using the count switch, -c. Example $ ping -c 2 skinner PING skinner.bubba.net (192.168.1.3) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from skinner.bubba.net (192.168.1.3): icmp_req=1 ttl=64 time=1.00 ms 64 bytes from skinner.bubba.net (192.168.1.3): icmp_req=2 ttl=64 time=1.13 ms --- skinner.bubba.net ping ...


7

0.0.0.0 has the specific meaning "unspecified". This roughly translates to "there is none" in the context of a gateway. Of course, this means that the network is locally connected, as there is no next hop. As a destination, 0.0.0.0/0 is special: if there are no network bits, there can't be anything in the network number either. So, it's naturally ...


7

The traditional answer is to run the program as another user and use iptables -m owner. That way, the network configuration is shared. However, with the advent of namespaces, there is an easier way. With namespaces, you unshare the network, then create a virtual network link if you need limited network access. To share unix domain sockets, all you need is ...


7

Sorry but I got it myself. I had to flush the device before bringing it up: alix:~# ip addr flush dev eth1


7

Each network adapter on linux has a sysctl boolean parameter accept_local (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/accept_local). Try setting it to 0 for all adapters involved (additionally, you may need to modify your routing table to suit your test setup). Also, make sure that rp_filter (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/rp_filter) is enabled (not 0). Reference: ...


7

There are a few ways. The modern way: use ip. ip -s link The output is pretty self-explanatory. The old way: use ifconfig. ifconfig -a Also self-explanatory, but not as trivial to parse. The /proc way: cat /proc/net/dev Look at the proc(5) man page for more information (there really isn't much). This is a bit hard for human eyes, but very easy to ...


7

Method #1 - from NetworkManager's Applet Try disabling the wireless networking under the Network Applet that's accessible from under the icons in the upper right of your desktop. ...


7

Look at the output of the last command and anything with an IP address or hostname instead of a blank space came in over the network. If sshd is the only way of doing that on this system, then there you go. Alternatively (if this is Linux), you can check /var/log/secure where sshd will usually keep track of connections made even if they don't result in ...


7

Yes it's entirely possible that your firewall is blocking the traceroute from being successful. To understand why this is failing it's best to consult the traceroute man page. excerpt This program attempts to trace the route an IP packet would follow to some internet host by launching probe packets with a small ttl (time to live) then listening for an ...


7

The simplest method I know to list all of your interfaces is ifconfig -a EDIT If you're on a system where that has been made obsolete, you can use ip link show


7

Assuming I'm reading correctly, your problem isn't that you want to know how to change the IP address, it's that you want to prevent changing it to something that stops future access. This isn't necessarily a technical problem, it's a quality issue. However, you might try something like this (you'll need to work out how to achieve it in detail). Write a ...


7

Your path looks ok, but does not include /sbin, which may be intended. You were probably looking for the command /sbin/ifconfig. If this file does not exist (try ls /sbin/ifconfig), the command may just be not installed. It is part of the package net-tools, which is not installed by default, because it's deprecated and superseeded by the command ip ...



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