Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

None of these commands are standard Unix ones so they can be anything. First have a look to what the shell is actually calling when they are run: $ type modem1 Type will likely tell the queried command is an alias, a function, or an executable file. In the latter case, you can use the file command to figure out if it is a shell script or a binary, eg: ...


3

Rather than roll your own and have to cope with everything that can go wrong (host not responding, host stopping responding in the middle, user pressing Ctrl+C, error reporting, …), use one of the many existing tools to run a command on many machines over SSH. mussh -t 4 -H <(printf '%s\n' "${HOSTS[@]}") -c 'uname -a' pssh -t 4 -h <(printf '%s\n' ...


2

A typical way to do this is to use the trap command to tell the shell script to ignore SIGINT (generated by Control-C), and then to re-enable SIGINT in a subshell just before your command is run. trap "" INT HOSTS=(MACHINE1 MACHINE2 MACHINE3 MACHINE4 MACHINE5) for i in "${HOSTS[@]}" do echo "$i" (trap - INT; ssh -q "$i" "uname -a") done


1

A gateway would need to be configured in your interfaces file; e.g., something like iface wlan0 inet static address 192.168.x.y gateway 192.168.x.z netmask 255.255.255.0 would work (where x is your network number, y the address for your host, and z the address for your gateway). Obviously you need to retain your encryption settings, too. If ...


1

Look at the keepcache parameter. I believe that it goes in /etc/dnf/dnf.conf and should read keepcache=1 or keepcache="true"


1

I've been pleased with symon, which collects data about network interface usage (as well as other metrics like CPU and memory usage) and displays them in a web interface. Here's an example showing traffic for one network interface for the past week: Symon makes it very easy to monitor multiple network interfaces. Your situation might look like this: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible