Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Apache works fine even without setting up Virtual Hosts. Virtual Host(s) are needed only if you want to set up additional webservers on the same machine, and these can be either: Port-based Virtual Hosts (webservers running on a different port than 80) IP-based Virtual Hosts (webservers running on a different IP) Name-based Virtual Host (webserver ...


1

The answers from jasonwryan and gelraen both point to dead links for the source code. The net-tools project is now hosted at sourceforge per this announcement.


0

Assuming you can login to the host and see running processes, the simplest way is to use netstat netstat -lnp | grep <apache|httpd> Use apache for debian, httpd for cent/rhel. Barring that option, you can use nmap to discover the services provided you don't have an IDS/IPS that will shut down your connections at a given point. Or use browser ...


0

You could do that with a nmap and a script, e.g. http-get.nse* $ nmap -p* --open --script http-get.nse --script-args http-get.path=/,http-get.match="downloads" 192.168.13.2 Starting Nmap 6.40 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2015-05-13 23:09 CEST Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.2 Host is up (0.029s latency). Not shown: 4235 closed ports PORT STATE SERVICE 22/tcp ...


4

One specific script, no, but there is a way to get that information. Several ways, probably. I would start with netstat -tuln, which will tell you what ports have listening services associated with them. You can then look at things like fuser -n tcp <port num> to tell what PID(s) is/are listening to a given port, which can then tell you what daemon / ...


1

I understand the routing table is a "fall through" table Not really. The routing table is ordered from "most specific route" to "least specific route". Your default route is via br0, and is defined as the route of last resort because there is no netmask (i.e. genmask is 0.0.0.0). because the 1st entry is 0.0.0.0 all traffic will go through the tun1 ...


0

I think you can use route command instead of iptables: route 111.112.113.114 gw 10.182.1.5 Or you can also push the route from openvpn server's side.


0

It seems those ports are Chromium's attempt at discovering local web servers announced through the Zeroconf protocol, specifically the Multicast DNS protocol. Basically, it means that if a web server on the local network exist, Chromium will notice it and pop out a notification. This has been known to trigger warnings in Windows so it is disabled there by ...


1

As far as your browser is concerned, it's connected to 74.125.141.104. A DNAT doesn't change that fact. If you DNAT port 80 coming from the internet to port 80 on an internal webserver at e.g. 10.201.87.80, would you expect netstat on the remote system to show 10.201.87.80 as the remote IP or your external IP? PS: 10.201.87.64:599449 is impossible, port ...


0

Actually, it's slightly more interesting Basically, even if you completely disable IPv6, some sockets will get identified as "TCP6/UDP6" due to curious kernel reasons. I noticed it after I ran netstat on an android phone that was connected to a 3G network without an inking of IPv6 support (disabled in APN settings and explicitly not supported by carrier) ...


2

If there is no traffic initiated by the first host, the connection will happily stay in "ESTABLISHED" state forever until either the local process closes the connection or the remote host closes the connection. Now imagine there is a network interruption between the hosts; no packets from the remote host can reach the first host. During this outage the ...


0

First, the etime field indicates when the process is started. This does not necessarily means that a connection is bound to it for that time. Next, maybe that some network address translation is being used? If so, please grep for the portnumber on the remote host: netstat -natup|grep 40740 to see what that returns.



Top 50 recent answers are included