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2

It seems that you simply don't have these tools installed. On CentOS, you should be able to install them easily with yum. Try this: $ yum install nmap netstat


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a.First log in on A as user a and generate a pair of authentication keys b.Now use ssh to create a directory ~/.ssh as user b on B. (The directory may already exist, which is fine) ssh b@B mkdir -p .ssh b@B's password c. Finally append a's new public key to b@B:.ssh/authorized_keys and enter b's password one last time: cat .ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh b@B ...


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to avoid SSH password promts: sudo apt-get install sshpass An alternative tool for package installation is dpkg download the sshpass deb packet and install it: sudo dpkg -i sshpass_1.04-1_amd64.deb pattern to use as follows: sshpass -p mypassword ssh user@server if needed to avoid sudo password promt: ssh uder@server-abc.com "echo sudo_password | ...


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For a passwordless login you should create an SSH Keygen. For more information on the subject and how to do it see : https://help.github.com/articles/generating-ssh-keys.


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netstat doesn't accept an IP address argument. The only non-option argument is a delay, and that's not in all versions. The command will Print network connections, routing tables, interface statistics, masquerade connections, and multicast memberships for the local machine. It doesn't have any access to data about other machines, only connections to ...


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127.0.0.1 and 0.0.0.0 127.0.0.1 means local interface or loopback address. Only accessible from your localhost. 0.0.0.0 is a wildcard address for every interface. On netstat -ntlp Local Address means "Print active listening tcp connections, show IPs as numeric values and show the PID and name of the program that uses this connection." Difference by ...


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I think you've answered your own question. As an example, apache has it's Listen option which tells it which address and port to listen on. Depending on how this is set, apache will listen on any IP address, a specific address:- Listen *:80 Listen 0.0.0.0:80 Listen 127.0.0.1:80 Listen 192.168.0.5:80 The above options show up as:- :::80 0.0.0.0:80 ...


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0.0.0.0 means the process is bound to all interfaces. 127.0.0.1 means the process is bound only to the 127.0.0.1 interface (loopback). If you had other interfaces you might have x.y.z.a entries indicating the process was bound to those specific interfaces. A process will only be told if traffic arrives on the interfaces to which it is bound, so yes, it's ...


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The "local address" is the address to which the socket in question is bound. This is the address which it receives connections on. The addresses you're asking about are "special addresses". According to the manual page for the Linux IPv4 protocol: There are several special addresses: INADDR_LOOPBACK (127.0.0.1) always refers to the local host via the ...


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As you told, the IP of localhost only accept connections to those ports locally while the IP 0.0.0.0 refers to ports that are open to all. For example Local 127.0.0.1:8307 VMWARE 127.0.0.1:25 MASTER To all 0.0.0.0:80 HTTP 0.0.0.0:443 SKYPE



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