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11

OpenBSD is binary-centric. You can update the binaries (if any updates/changes are available) by executing pkg_add: pkg_add -Uu The OpenBSD team recommends using the packages over building from ports - The OpenBSD packages and ports system FreeBSD can be updated via packages or ports.


9

I would call in to question the experimenters methods here. Next we analyzed the uptime and response speed per each Operating System. We are monitoring every 30min simultaneously from 3 locations in the USA, Germany, and Austria, so we are performing 1,008 checks per week per each website. That means for example that we made for detected ...


8

You're question is pretty general, so I'll just take a little stab at the NetBSD part: The webpage of NetBSD's vax port lists supported machines (such as yours), many can use NetBSD 6.0.1, some are only supported in -current. It also points to VAXarchive, a website collection some information that might help you further. It also points to the vax port of ...


5

Well, it is not just about the fact that SDF switched to Linux and then back to NetBSD. First they switched to Linux on x86-Hardware and then to NetBSD on DEC Alpha hardware. It is safe to say that the NetBSD/Alpha architecture is less popular in comparison to Linux/x86. That means that it is much easier to get ready-to-run exploits or exploitation-meta-...


5

You could create a normal user, e.g. juser, and add it to the /etc/aliases file on the right hand side of the root entry. For normal forwarding of root-mail you would just create a .forward (which contains your external e-mail address) in the home directory of juser. Regarding encryption you can use a MDA (mail delivery agent for that), e.g. procmail and ...


5

My answer is to the "any suggestions" part of your question. While you hunt down a terminal, note that if you have another computer with a serial port, you can use a null modem cable and a terminal emulator program to connect to the console. On windows you can use putty, tip on solaris, or minicom on linux. (if you have USB but no serial port, you can use ...


5

NetBSD has documentation here: Part V. Building the system You might be able to compile a NetBSD kernel on OSX. At a minimum, you would need the kernel source tree, i.e., /sys (which at least does not conflict with OSX's system directories). whatever tools are needed, you probably have to download source and compile those. build.sh is only a small part ...


4

openntpd has to be patched to be usefull on Linux or it won't adjust the system clock. Moreover, the porting to other OS is made by a separate team and is always behind the main branch, so it has very small chances to become the default ntpd on any other OS than OpenBSD. If you are looking for an alternative ntp server, the only actual competitor to ntd.org ...


4

Generally speaking NetBSD is less popular than Linux, so it has less installations and hence, less attention for malicious attacks. Linux itself is considered to be stable and secure enough but there is no 100% secure systems in the world. In millions lines of source code of Linux there must be bunch of security holes anyway. As I said popularity attracts ...


4

The program will exit as soon as the rc.local script is finished. So, here's the complete procedure that doesn't require the program to understand any of the rc.d stuff: Make the script executable (e.g. chmod a+x /usr/local/bin/httpd) Add the following line to your /etc/rc.local: nohup /usr/local/bin/httpd &


4

http://ftp.NetBSD.org/pub/pkgsrc/packages/$(uname -s)/$(uname -m)/$(uname -r|cut -f '1 2' -d.)/All The above code should work for every version of NetBSD you have. Source: The PKGSRC WEBPAGE


4

I don't really understand your question, what's the actual question? First you are stating that you can access the history via the fc builtin and then you are asking if the shell implements a history? Furthermore, the man page states: The number of previous commands that can be accessed are determined by the value of the HISTSIZE variable. and A ...


4

It takes roughly a day for me to build 5 or so different architectures, as complete release builds (aka, tarballs and ISO images.) I'm building on a relatively low memory (512M), i386 virtual machine, using a script that also checks out the sources, and does a bunch of setup around build.sh. If you have more than one processor/core, you can speed things up ...


3

OpenBSD: M:Tier provides stable packages for the amd64 and i386 architectures. This allows you to keep your system up to date with the most recent security fixes from the -stable ports branch. An article on OpenBSD Journal explains the details: In practice, this means that as soon as a security fix/update is committed to the OPENBSD_5_3 tree a package ...


3

In general, when using OpenBSD you only update your packages when you update your system. So, as a final step, after upgrading to the latest release, you should execute: # pkg_add -ui Which will (u)pgrade your installed packages asking you any questions (i)nteractive when needed. In general, packages for a given release are not updated until the next ...


3

It should not. I would try restarting the process. In addition to that, there is not so much you can do, in addition to digging to source code to see what is wrong. As you probably already know, if your server is completely empty, it is possible that generating random data takes long time. However, installing packages and poking around should be enough to ...


3

you don't need to create anything: NetBSD now provides the Installer on ready to use USB images. you can download them here: ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub//NetBSD/NetBSD-5.1/memstick/


3

openntpd is included in Ubuntu - since Dapper (8.10 that is) So, it must be the same for Debian. I am sure you can easily find the same information for rpm based distros. But it is not default ntp daemon.


3

You installed system gcc compiler. Your original question was how to install gcc-4.8xx. If you are using pkgsrc the easiest thing is cd /usr/pkgsrc/lang/gcc48 make install clean clean-depens Note that NetBSD has multiple versions of gcc compiler the 2.9.5 probably the most useful and the last truly portable gcc version. The first place to check for ...


3

Maybe it will take more than 90 min to build the kernel . To speed up the compilation process we need to use -j option for example if you have 2 core you can type: fakeroot make-kpkg..... -j 2 or make -j 2 you can speed up the compilation process X2 ( 45 min) , (8 core less than 10min) Also you can use the CONCURRENCY_LEVEL variable for example if ...


3

I would suggest that any decent not-so-modern x86_64 true server should be able do a full build in a couple of hours or maybe less, including xsrc. My NetBSD-current build server is a Xen domU with 8GB RAM and 8 VCPUs running on a Dell PE2950 8-core (Xeon E5440 @2.83GHz) with 32GB RAM and with a decently fast set of SAS disks on the integrated PERC 6/i ...


3

A PGP-signed list of hashes is available, covering all the release files. The PGP key used to sign this is well connected in the web of trust.


2

I just looked at the FreeBSD source for the non-ports version of ntpd, the FreeBSD ntpd is the ntp.org version. There's an openntpd in ports though. It looks like NetBSD has a package for ntpd and openntpd. I can't see any reason why you couldn't run OpenNTPd on any Linux distro. It might make sense, considering the weird licensing that exists on the ...


2

Are you sure it only lets you use one disk? It asks you for a root disk to install the bootloader. You should select the smaller disk and select manual partitioning. Read the manual for disk label or, if you know what you are doing, the installer help. After you set this disk up, other disks should be offered for setup in a list. Enter the name of the ...


2

Even if they were otherwise methodologically perfect — which they are not — you cannot compare sample sizes of 7295 of 238 and derive anything meaningful from their relative means. That's not how statistics works.


2

Remove the -Werror option which is passed to gcc somewhere in the Makefile. The warning will then be merely considered as a warning and won't interrupt the compilation process.


2

The official NetBSD answer is to use RPATH. Crazy.


2

AFAIK, editing /boot.cfg is the preferred method. You can even specify more human-readable modes; I am using (on -current, 7.99 in a VirtualBox VM) menu=Boot normally:rndseed /var/db/entropy-file:;vesa 1024x768x32; boot netbsd I think having this in the kernel somehow without it being compiled in would be bad - if you update your kernel you'd lose the ...


2

Try the command indicated in the error message: export FORCE_UNSAFE_CONFIGURE=1 && make This being said, it is true the "unsafe configure" requirement seems a bit strange. Double-check the log (config.log) and see if there is something more explicit in there.


2

Yes, it is possible, but quite complicated. However, your question does not supply enough information on the hardware used to be able to answer it completely. Especially since modern computers can be quite a pain in the neck when it comes to booting and partitioning (for instance, with UEFI). Essentially, using the different fdisk commands, create ...



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