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9

I would call in to question the experimenters methods here. Next we analyzed the uptime and response speed per each Operating System. We are monitoring every 30min simultaneously from 3 locations in the USA, Germany, and Austria, so we are performing 1,008 checks per week per each website. That means for example that we made for detected ...


8

You're question is pretty general, so I'll just take a little stab at the NetBSD part: The webpage of NetBSD's vax port lists supported machines (such as yours), many can use NetBSD 6.0.1, some are only supported in -current. It also points to VAXarchive, a website collection some information that might help you further. It also points to the vax port of ...


5

OpenBSD is binary-centric. You can update the binaries (if any updates/changes are available) by executing pkg_add: pkg_add -Uu The OpenBSD team recommends using the packages over building from ports - The OpenBSD packages and ports system FreeBSD can be updated via packages or ports.


5

Well, it is not just about the fact that SDF switched to Linux and then back to NetBSD. First they switched to Linux on x86-Hardware and then to NetBSD on DEC Alpha hardware. It is safe to say that the NetBSD/Alpha architecture is less popular in comparison to Linux/x86. That means that it is much easier to get ready-to-run exploits or ...


5

You could create a normal user, e.g. juser, and add it to the /etc/aliases file on the right hand side of the root entry. For normal forwarding of root-mail you would just create a .forward (which contains your external e-mail address) in the home directory of juser. Regarding encryption you can use a MDA (mail delivery agent for that), e.g. procmail and ...


4

openntpd has to be patched to be usefull on Linux or it won't adjust the system clock. Moreover, the porting to other OS is made by a separate team and is always behind the main branch, so it has very small chances to become the default ntpd on any other OS than OpenBSD. If you are looking for an alternative ntp server, the only actual competitor to ntd.org ...


4

Generally speaking NetBSD is less popular than Linux, so it has less installations and hence, less attention for malicious attacks. Linux itself is considered to be stable and secure enough but there is no 100% secure systems in the world. In millions lines of source code of Linux there must be bunch of security holes anyway. As I said popularity attracts ...


4

My answer is to the "any suggestions" part of your question. While you hunt down a terminal, note that if you have another computer with a serial port, you can use a null modem cable and a terminal emulator program to connect to the console. On windows you can use putty, tip on solaris, or minicom on linux. (if you have USB but no serial port, you can use ...


3

The program will exit as soon as the rc.local script is finished. So, here's the complete procedure that doesn't require the program to understand any of the rc.d stuff: Make the script executable (e.g. chmod a+x /usr/local/bin/httpd) Add the following line to your /etc/rc.local: nohup /usr/local/bin/httpd &


3

It should not. I would try restarting the process. In addition to that, there is not so much you can do, in addition to digging to source code to see what is wrong. As you probably already know, if your server is completely empty, it is possible that generating random data takes long time. However, installing packages and poking around should be enough to ...


3

openntpd is included in Ubuntu - since Dapper (8.10 that is) So, it must be the same for Debian. I am sure you can easily find the same information for rpm based distros. But it is not default ntp daemon.


2

I once did this on OpenBSD and followed http://openbsd.totorux.info/openbsd-wiki.org/index.php/Installing_Daemontools Maybe it can help under NetBSD, too?


2

Are you sure it only lets you use one disk? It asks you for a root disk to install the bootloader. You should select the smaller disk and select manual partitioning. Read the manual for disk label or, if you know what you are doing, the installer help. After you set this disk up, other disks should be offered for setup in a list. Enter the name of the ...


2

you don't need to create anything: NetBSD now provides the Installer on ready to use USB images. you can download them here: ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub//NetBSD/NetBSD-5.1/memstick/


2

I just looked at the FreeBSD source for the non-ports version of ntpd, the FreeBSD ntpd is the ntp.org version. There's an openntpd in ports though. It looks like NetBSD has a package for ntpd and openntpd. I can't see any reason why you couldn't run OpenNTPd on any Linux distro. It might make sense, considering the weird licensing that exists on the ...


2

Remove the -Werror option which is passed to gcc somewhere in the Makefile. The warning will then be merely considered as a warning and won't interrupt the compilation process.


2

Even if they were otherwise methodologically perfect — which they are not — you cannot compare sample sizes of 7295 of 238 and derive anything meaningful from their relative means. That's not how statistics works.


2

In general, when using OpenBSD you only update your packages when you update your system. So, as a final step, after upgrading to the latest release, you should execute: # pkg_add -ui Which will (u)pgrade your installed packages asking you any questions (i)nteractive when needed. In general, packages for a given release are not updated until the next ...


2

The official NetBSD answer is to use RPATH. Crazy.


2

You installed system gcc compiler. Your original question was how to install gcc-4.8xx. If you are using pkgsrc the easiest thing is cd /usr/pkgsrc/lang/gcc48 make install clean clean-depens Note that NetBSD has multiple versions of gcc compiler the 2.9.5 probably the most useful and the last truly portable gcc version. The first place to check for ...


1

I have no a "how-to" answer for this, I have very little experience with embedded devices and I'm pretty sure asking on linux or netbsd development lists probably would be a better choice. If there's no an already running project which provides installable images this is going to be very tricky and risky... :-) Usually the first approach is to open it up ...


1

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009604599/functions/gettimeofday.html does indeed say it was added in 2001.


1

OpenBSD: for amd64 and i386 M:Tier provides stable packages (with security fixes). an article on undeadly explains the details: In practice, this means that as soon as a security fix/update is committed to the OPENBSD_5_3 tree a package will be built from the CVS tree. This package is then being tested and pushed to our fan-out server over at ...


1

It's now (since May 2012) in pkgsrc -- lang/python32


1

For some reason, you have to touch some files during the make process. When make quits with this Error 127, run: touch ./Include/typeslots.h touch ./Objects/type touch ./Objects/typeslots.py make Inside of the Python source directory. It will complain a second time: ./Python/makeopcodetargets.py ./Python/opcode_targets.h env: python: No such file or ...


1

I would just like to add the fact that Linux offers a much wider and better support on the driver-side, NetBSD, as all the major BSD OS, is a great OS, but most of the time I still use it as a "toy" because I just don't get the necessary drivers with it, and you can feel this gap across the board, from the VGA to the ACPI functionality, there are a lot of ...


1

You would have to take a much closer look at the servers being monitored to make an intelligent judgement, the numbers are very close. You can get five nines from any one of the above mentioned OS. The question really is how hard are you going have to work to maintain five nines and what risks will you take to do it. Windows typically has allot of ...


1

I've done this on Linux. I had an old laptop that had no ethernet port, and I had no USB-ethernet port or PCMCIA ethernet adapters, but it did have a serial port. You need a null modem cable, and your NetBSD needs to be running a PPP daemon (it's called pppd on Linux). You then set up serial port in Windows XP as a modem. You need to go to the "Phone and ...


1

Has OpenBSD's ntpd replacement been ported to other BSDs? Or Linux? http://openntpd.org/portable.html



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