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12

Woohoo, I solved it :) The short answer is you can't mount >4k block size devices on x86 linux machines as far as I can tell without some serious kernel hacking. However, there is a work around.. using fuse-ext2 to mount the disk: fuseext2 -o ro -o sync_read /dev/sdb4 /mnt/ (you'll probably need to apt-get fuseext2 first..) works perfectly first time! ...


7

You're working from a shaky premise, being that badblocks can solve your problem in the first place. Why badblocks Is an Untrustworthy Repair Method As you use a hard drive, it continually does its best to hide problems from you by swapping fresh sectors in for dodgy ones. The hard disk ships from the factory with a pool of spare sectors for this very ...


3

This should do it: cd /volume1/Drive/Series ln -s ../SeriesPC/* .


2

As per comments rsync is a good tool to use. Basic rsync usage simply mirrors a directory. For example: rsync -a --delete /source/dir /backup/dir Will make the backup directory match the source; if there is stuff in the backup that isn't in the source, it will be deleted (--delete), and if there is stuff that is in both, it will be updated in the backup ...


2

The simplest approach, assuming you want to back up folder /foo would be to create a simple little crontab to run rsync daily. Create your crontab by running crontab -e. In the editor window that will appear, add this line (assuming your NAS is mounted locally, you can use ssh if not): @daily rsync -glprtu /foo /path/to/NAS/mount Close the editor window. ...


2

If LVM is nothing for you, why don't you use an aufs (overlay) filesystem. It works like this: user@host:~# mount -t aufs -o br=/mnt/disk1:/mnt/disk2 none /nas/share/ The mount command, specifies it is going to union mount /mnt/disk1/ and /mnt/disk2/ under /nas/share/. The directory /nas/share/ will have the content of both /mnt/disk1/ and /mnt/disk2/. ...


2

Your strategy for naming seems fine. In my department at university, disks are exported similarly as: /machine-name/s0 /machine-name/s1 /machine-name/s2 to all other local machines. This is essentially the same naming scheme you propose. One thing you'll have to consider if you want to access you NAS from multiple machines is consistency of userid ...


2

Basically, any ARM compatible distro is worth a try, it does not need to be small, just configurable. I would recommend you go with Arch which installs a minimal system but makes it easy for you to expand it by downloading and installing packages, but the choice is yours. You can find help on installing Debian on your NAS here and a user here reports ...


2

There are several ways to create a SoftRAID with Linux: LVM's internal RAID and four versions of MD RAID (mdadm): 0.90, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2. Every non-ancient Linux should understand them all. There should not be any problem with a distro change.


2

You can do that through NFS. Mount the disk to a machine and share that drive through NFS to the other machine. Suppose the disk to be shared is /dev/sdb and the machines that you want to share the disk is machine1.example.com and machine2.example.com, then: Mount /dev/sdb in machine1 (You can skip this step if the said disk is already mounted and being ...


2

If you were using a tool like eCryptfs that decrypts file "on-the-fly", you could mount and share the decrypted data in a "Visible" folder, and also separately share the encrypted data in the ".Private" folder. The "Visible" folder's decrypted data is only visible while mounted, and it doesn't take up any extra disk space since it's not a hard on-disk ...


2

Maintenance costs. Especially if you are not very familiar with Linux administration. NAS distributions will contain all needed packages out of the box, and also usually will have a web interface for easy configuration.


2

In addition to 에이바's answer, you may want to place the credentials in a specific file called .smbcredentials in your home directory for a little more security. This is a good practice especially for multiuser systems. This way you will be protecting your cifs password. Create a file: /home/myname/.smbcredentials and include just two lines: username=myname ...


2

Use the gui to mount the encrypted directory, then login to the synology as root over ssh and type mount. You will see a line like /volume1/@mycryptdir@ on /volume1/mycryptdir type ecryptfs (rw,relatime,ecryptfs_fnek_sig=88...,ecryptfs_sig=88...,ecryptfs_cipher=aes,ecryptfs_key_bytes=32) This shows your directory /volume1/mycryptdir is implemented on an ...


1

I would suggest using autofs to mount the NFS share. When your NFS server isn't reachable, it won't be able to automount the volume.


1

You can try to add -o sshfs_debug to your command to get some debugging information for sshfs. If that doesn't give you more detailed information, use any of -o LogLevel=VERBOSE -o LogLevel=DEBUG -o LogLevel=DEBUGX # with X being 1, 2 or 3 for increasing ssh verbosity.


1

Each line in the /etc/fstab file contains the following fields separated by spaces or tabs: file_system dir type options dump pass A typical mount point added in /etc/fstab would look like the following: # <file system> <dir> <type> <options> <dump> <pass> /dev/sda1 ...


1

Apparently you just created the array. The copying of files has nothing to do with it. Both disks are supposed to always contain the same data, so when you first create the array, the entire contents of the first drive has to be copied to the second to ensure they are identical. After that finishes, then writing data just writes to both drives at the same ...


1

Problem found & fixed. Was wrong dir path on NAS server, I used the path for admin user which is full path, but since pie only has access to the pi folder, then it just "direct" connect to that folder.


1

As the synology uses a non-standard linux environment and CPU architecture, it isn't as simple as dropping a binary on the box. However, vlc can be installed via optware on the synology, which is (relatively) simple to setup. You can see that vlc is available in optware here: http://ipkg.nslu2-linux.org/feeds/optware/cs08q1armel/cross/unstable/ To setup ...


1

A Network Attached Storage (NAS) device is normally used as a storage device that shares data over the network. What you are trying to achieve is possible in theory, but it is very uncommon and may therefore be hard to get working. First of all, support for Thunderbolt is quite low in open source operating systems. As you figured out, FreeBSD has no support ...


1

How do I fully mirror the linux partition while it's running? Not the best idea (for many reasons, rsync(1) running out of memory being the main one), but it might be possible. Can I exclude any of the root directories safely? Some of them (f.i. /proc) must be excluded, most of the others probably should be backed up. Will it be easy to reverse ...


1

I think problem there df -H One of your disks is fully loaded. All you need is lsof | grep deleted | less This help you to understand what files were deleted and "keeps in memory" by processes. For solve your problem you should restart process that holds deleted files.


1

If you share the storage as a file-share, no problems are to be expected. Think a CIFS (Samba) share or NFS from either the NAS appliance or from one server to another. If you share the disk as a block device, i.e. an iSCSI or Fiber Channel LUN you'll need a cluster aware file-system on top of that to facilitate concurrent read-write operations from both ...


1

In addition to LVM internal RAID and mdadm RAID that Hauke mentioned Btrfs and ZFS have RAID support built-in. Btrfs has RAID-0, RAID-1, RAID-10 and staring with Linux 3.9 RAID-5 and RAID-6. Those are in compatible with other Btrfs version with at least the same version. ZFS has RAID-0, RAID-1, RAID-10, RAID-5, RAID-6, RAID-0 under different names, as well ...


1

If you are looking to stream arbitrary live Windows sound output, a commercial solution is Rogue Amoeba's Airfoil paired with "Airfoil Speakers for Linux". I don't know of a currently available FOSS solution. (PulseAudio on Windows is defunct.)


1

You are using BusyBox' umount, presumably that one doesn't understand encfs specific flags (and its mount might also do things wrong). Does the encfs package include mount/unmount programs? Better use those. Perhaps you need to build a BusyBox with encfs support?


1

How can I debug this? Try to strace the command. That should show the syscalls the program is making, which could help you narrow it down.


1

I would do the following if you want all the files/directories under SeriesPC to be linked: cd /volume1/Drive/SeriesPC for i in * ; do ln -s "$PWD/$i" /volume1/Drive/Series/ ; done If not everything under SeriesPC should be linked make sure you can find just the directories that you need e.g. using find * -maxdepth 1 -type d and then do: cd /volume1/...


1

The only way to do it is as you suggest: copy all the datasets to a new pool and rebuild this one. zfs does not support extending raidz1's by adding drives to it, and it doesn't support removing top-level vdevs either (which is what 'mirror' is).



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