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I installed the RHEL7 package on my newly installed Fedora 21 (x86_64). Works flawlessly thus far.


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As php strings are mutable, you can use a variable say $url for your server urls. Add the string xyzserver.com/examplescript.php with the appropriate identifier to match your dev/staging/production needs. like, if it is development $dev="development" $dev. = "xyzserver.com/examplescript.php"


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from the php 5.3 configure file: if test "$PHP_MYSQL" = "mysqlnd"; then PHP_MYSQLND_ENABLED=yes elif test "$PHP_MYSQL" != "no"; then MYSQL_DIR= MYSQL_INC_DIR= for i in $PHP_MYSQL /usr/local /usr; do if test -r $i/include/mysql/mysql.h; then MYSQL_DIR=$i MYSQL_INC_DIR=$i/include/mysql break ...


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Editing the LSB init.d info header in an init.d script will not directly modify the start order and such. To make the system re-examine all init.d scripts and apply any changes you need to run the insserv command after editing.


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You have to install the commandline interface version of php before you can use it from bash: yum install php-cli the commandline version is not necessary if PHP is part of a page in nginx.


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I'm not sure if you replace \n with ^M will be fix your issue. But you can use tr command to replace it with single back-slash: $ printf "%s\n" 'a\\b'| tr -s '\\' '\\' a\b


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If you want to replace \\ with \ with sed you just need to escape each of \, so for example: $ printf "%s\n" 'a\\b' a\\b $ printf "%s\n" 'a\\b' | sed 's/\\\\/\\/g' a\b But, frankly speaking it seems that in your case it would be better to correct mysql command, so I think this question is better suited to stackoverflow.com.


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Depends on how you installed MySQL-python. If with "pip" no. If MySQL was installed you would have had to supply a user and password. I doubt you would forget either. Easiest method to check if MySQL is installed you will have a /etc/mysql/ directory. You can check the process list to check if MySQL is running with ps -ef | grep mysql. If it shows no ...


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Sometimes you can clobber your configuration. As such, it's easier to start over, as if the package had never been installed. In your case, we are looking at MySQL. We use Yum to Remove MySQL, like so: yum remove mysql mysql-server With MySQL removed, we can safely backup the configuration: mv /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysql_old_backup If you'd rather ...


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It is probably because the 'restart' is not killing the MySQL started in the sos mode by 'startsos' and port 3306 (or wherever it is running) is occupied. After the 4th step, please try these: $ sudo service mysqld stop $ ps -ef | grep mysql Now, from the output of ps, if you don't see any mysql processes running, then start MySQL using the below command. ...


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If you can get into MySQL when using the command: mysql -u root Then you already have access to MySQL, you will either not have a password set for the "root" user (most likely) or you may have a password set in a configuration file for MySQL such as /etc/my.cnf. If you want to reset your MySQL root password then you should be able to run: $ ...


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You can do something like this: #! bin/bash selectvar="SELECT * FROM test;" mysql --user=root --password=mypass database << eof $selectvar eof


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To execute statements from the command line without an interactive prompt, use the -e option: mysql mydb -e 'select * from foo'


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::1 is the ipv6 version of 127.0.0.1


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The address ::1 (or 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 with all fields written out) is an IP version 6 address and specifies the loopback address in host scope. So technically, it is the same as the IP version 4 address 127.0.0.1.


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You might want to look into Puppet - it is excellent for installing and configuring software automatically. There's also a MySQL module, but I haven't tried it.


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It should be okay. Unlike the top command, htop by default lists all the threads along with the processes. So all the 'mysqld' that you are seeing are not processes, but threads. Do this: Grab the PID of a few mysql entries you see in the htop output and grep it in the output of ps. Eg: ps -ef | grep 14082 Here, the grep probably won't return any mysql ...



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