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There is probably a root password stetup there normally you should run mysql_secure_installation as root that will prompt you for mysql root password and there just hit enter. In your case it looks like there is a root password setup you can change it by using sudo mysqld_safe --user=mysql --pid-file=/var/run/mysql/mysqld.pid ...


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Sabayon is based in systemd. To start the service you have to do systemctl start mysqld. The reference to MySQL manual is systemctl_Mysql


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If you use monit you might be able to do this to monitor the filesystem and restart mysql-services when disk space is too low. Check https://mmonit.com/monit/documentation/monit.html#filesystem_flags_testing


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As you say, you are asking for an unorthodox solution, but since you acknowledge that, you can check free space with df df /partition/you/need/to/monitor Parse the output of that, and based on what you find, restart your mysql service. You'll probably need root privs for that, so you might need to give yourself permission to restart the service with a ...


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If you use systemd to start mysql then you can add LimitFSIZE to the unit file. Without systemd you can use ulimit: bash -c 'ulimit -f 100; dd if=/dev/zero of=bigfile bs=10M count=1; echo foo' Both approaches do not refer to the free space, though. You have to calculate in advance how much they may consume. Maybe file system quota are more flexible (I ...


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Basically, the section 8.12.4 Using Symbolic Links is advising you that it is possible to make the database-directory (such as /var/lib/mysql) a symbolic link to another location with more space. With Ubuntu, you can do that, or you could make /dev/sdb mounted on /var/lib/mysql. A mountpoint may be (slightly) more efficient. Either way, to migrate your ...


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Problem solved, it required update control { ... } now everything seems fine.


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For clarity, the message mysqld dead but subsys locked is a symptom, not a cause. That is, it means mysqld crashed ("dead"), and the init system's state database has outdated information ("but subsys locked"). It doesn't tell you why things crashed. The problem is explained in your mysql server log: 160123 5:44:46 InnoDB: Initializing buffer pool, size = ...


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I found out why I couldn't start my two instances. It was necessary to comment [client] section in /etc/my.cnf file and wrote unit for /etc/systemd/system in a proper way. Here is the way I did it - hope this will help anybody who will encounter with the problem in my topic: Configuration of /etc/my.cnf file: [mysqld_multi] mysqld = ...


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MariaDB is a fork of MySQL. RedHat Enterprise Linux and its derivatives have shifted to MariaDB from MySQL. So you can install mariadb-server on CentOS7 using this command yum install mariadb-server mariadb. Here is a good step by step tutorial how you can do this in p.8 Install MariaDB Database or you can use this source for that Mariadb step by step


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Postfix would neither drop nor queue incoming mail, but would reject it with a temporary failure error code. Even if the recipient is a system user, postfix doesn't know if the aliases would direct the mail to a completely different location. Since an unreachable database could thus lead to unexpected behavior, postfix refuses to deal with the mail at all. ...


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Try cleaning yum: yum clean all Hope you have done this: Create a new file /etc/yum.repos.d/mysql-community.repo with the desired version. For 5.7, add the lines below: [mysql57-community] name=MySQL 5.7 Community Server baseurl=http://repo.mysql.com/yum/mysql-5.7-community/el/6/$basearch/ enabled=1 gpgcheck=1 ...


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The problem is that yum gives you the wrong error because of one bug. To solve it and see the real error, you need to apply this fix I found here. There is a bug in python-urlgrabber that is used by yum that results in the wrong error being generated. It was noticed during the el7 beta and reported but it appears not to have been fixed. The problem ...



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