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Postfix would neither drop nor queue incoming mail, but would reject it with a temporary failure error code. Even if the recipient is a system user, postfix doesn't know if the aliases would direct the mail to a completely different location. Since an unreachable database could thus lead to unexpected behavior, postfix refuses to deal with the mail at all. ...


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Sabayon is based in systemd. To start the service you have to do systemctl start mysqld. The reference to MySQL manual is systemctl_Mysql


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Basically, the section 8.12.4 Using Symbolic Links is advising you that it is possible to make the database-directory (such as /var/lib/mysql) a symbolic link to another location with more space. With Ubuntu, you can do that, or you could make /dev/sdb mounted on /var/lib/mysql. A mountpoint may be (slightly) more efficient. Either way, to migrate your ...


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If you use monit you might be able to do this to monitor the filesystem and restart mysql-services when disk space is too low. Check https://mmonit.com/monit/documentation/monit.html#filesystem_flags_testing


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As you say, you are asking for an unorthodox solution, but since you acknowledge that, you can check free space with df df /partition/you/need/to/monitor Parse the output of that, and based on what you find, restart your mysql service. You'll probably need root privs for that, so you might need to give yourself permission to restart the service with a ...


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If you use systemd to start mysql then you can add LimitFSIZE to the unit file. Without systemd you can use ulimit: bash -c 'ulimit -f 100; dd if=/dev/zero of=bigfile bs=10M count=1; echo foo' Both approaches do not refer to the free space, though. You have to calculate in advance how much they may consume. Maybe file system quota are more flexible (I ...


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For clarity, the message mysqld dead but subsys locked is a symptom, not a cause. That is, it means mysqld crashed ("dead"), and the init system's state database has outdated information ("but subsys locked"). It doesn't tell you why things crashed. The problem is explained in your mysql server log: 160123 5:44:46 InnoDB: Initializing buffer pool, size = ...



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