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32

You can use wget over ssh to open an HTTP connection and output stream data, then mplayer on the local machine to play it. ssh <user>@<host> "wget <stream> -O -" | mplayer -cache 512 - The subtleties: wget's -O (capital letter oh) option sets its output file; - (dash) implies stdout. mplayer's -cache option causes a configurable amount ...


18

You can use ssh's -L flag to create a tunnel from your system to a remote: ssh -L <localport>:<streamhost>:<streamport> <user>@<remote> You can then connect to your end of the tunnel with mplayer as you would otherwise: mplayer localhost:<localport>


5

sshfs is a wonderful tool for cases like this. It hides many a firewall and allows you to use whatever player you choose (though mplayer is still a nice choice). sudo apt-get install sshfs # your favorite packager here sshfs me@mydomain.org:/home/arthur/Music ~/Music I also run Subsonic listening to port 4040 on localhost and then ssh-tunnel home with ...


4

The tags are stored in a data container located within the MP3 audio file. Some software I use: easytag (GUI) id3v2 (CLI) Picard (GUI) id3tool (CLI) Also, many music players have tag editing features. The official site for ID3 has the file format specification and a history. As far as right-clicking a file to set a tag, it's almost certainly not a ...


4

Try installing ubuntu-restricted-extras. Ubuntu can't play MP3's and other closed-source encoders (AAC is one of them). You might even have to add a repository, but since I always enable all of those repos, this command worked for me: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras If you don't like the CLI too much, click here to open up Software Installer ...


4

I'm not sure about state now but Apple is know for play of cat and mouse. You may find one day that update of software of iPod had broken its compatibly with Linux by completly redesigning its format. Until one day someone reverse engeneer the new format and supplied patches for projects. It lasts as long as Apple would not decide to switch format again. ...


3

You can try using pulseaudio sound server daemon in the raspberry pi and configuring pulseaudio client with the internal network ip of the server in the configuration. For example if you are using Debian and raspbian. In raspbian: echo "snd_bcm2835" > /etc/modules /* load the sound module \*/ apt-get install pulseaudio pulseaudio-module-zeroconf ...


3

There is a list of music software maintained at linux-sound.org. It's pretty exhaustive, you might want to poke through that list and see if you can't find what you're looking for: http://linux-sound.org/notation.html Lilypond It looks like Lilypond can do what you want. The notation also goes by the name "Simple Notation" and also "Ziffersystem". ...


3

Assuming an m3u exported from banshee and you have your Android mounted you can do something like: rsync -avu --files-from=yourlist.m3u <MUSIC_DIR> /media/ANDROID/<ANDROID_MUSIC_DIR> For example: rsync -avu --files-from=yourlist.m3u "/home/user/Music" "/media/ANDROID/MUSIC" You can also add --delete rsync -avu --delete ...


2

vorbistagedit is just a shellscript which wraps around vorbiscomment. You could enhance that script to use one of the mp3 tag editors like mp3tag from http://www.mp3tag.de/en/ or an other one with batch facilities.


2

You can do this with mp4art, part of the mp4v2 project. On Ubuntu, you can find it in the mp4v2-utils package. mp4art --extract mysong.m4a should extract the covr-box. See the docs for more details.


2

To see the pollution of your library, try: find ./ -type f -iname "*.mp3" -exec /usr/bin/mid3v2 -l '{}' + | egrep -e ...


2

There's an open source acoustic fingerprinting system called Echoprint, you might want to check I want to deduplicate a big collection. I haven't used it before (just stumbled across it), but it sounds awesome to be able to do this locally.


2

Use MusicBrainz's Picard. It scans the music to generate a 'fingerprint' and then compares it against an online database to identify it (pulling all the info like Artist, Album, etc). After it's identified the songs, it can organize them into a custom directory & name structure, and you can use that to find the duplicates. Fully compatible with linux.


2

You can use amixer to better control the volume. But it really depends on the channel/card. For example, my card only has 255 levels, so even if I issue amixer set PCM '0.1dB-', the volume is reduced by a full 0.2 dB. Btw, it's a command line program, not graphical control. See man amixer or amixer -h.


1

The original reference implementation (of RFC4695 - now updated to RFC6295) from the guys who developed it is available as part an older version of their sfront software. A more up to date implementation is available in the Java based nmj library, which apparently works with iOS: http://www.humatic.de/htools/nmj There is also the interesting scenic ...


1

I got my information from askubuntu.com and from my own experience. iTunes feeds are encrypted to lock you out from doing exactly what you are trying to do. Banshee will actually show "You are running iTunes greater than version 7" (which you probably are) as one of the possible reasons it is failing, and explains this. There is no workaround that I know ...


1

I like Clementine, it's a good clone of what Amarok 1.x used to be like before they (IMO) messed it up with the version 2.x release. On a more general note, pretty nearly anything is better than iTunes - Apple is usually excellent with user-interface design, but that program is an unusable abomination. I'd think "WTF were they thinking?" except that it's ...


1

The same community that brought you Ogg, FLAC, Vorbis, and now Opus, created XSPF. Unlike M3U, XSPF is XML. Unlike SMIL, XSPF is simple. Unlike ASX, XSPF is open. From a practical standpoint, however, there isn't many software out there, that supports it. I still tend to use it for little projects, etc. but aside from RockBox, VLC and I ...


1

Scai seems to have it answered in the comments. A lot of these are just plain text, so there is no proprietary license on them; use whichever you'd like. M3U seems to be a popular choice. EDIT: polemon pointed out that some plain text formats such as ASX (XML-based) require a license for use. Watch out for things like this.


1

Your IPod should work with gtkpod which uses the libgpod library, like almost every linux application. Have a look at http://gtkpod.wikispaces.com/Supported+iPods for your model. After that, have a look at the "Getting Started" Page of the gtkpod project: http://www.gtkpod.org/wiki/Getting_started



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