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9

Maybe there is easier solution for this, but my first guess was to use actkbd - keyboard (but not only) shortcut daemon that works outside of X server. In config file you can bind any keys combination to any command. More details about running actkbd you can find in this answer. Rhythmbox can be controlled over dbus interface, so if you bind that command ...


8

You can easily wrap up a script using find and rl (package randomize-lines on debian). Something along the lines of: find "$1" -type f -name *.mp3 | rl | while read FILE; do mpg123 "$FILE"; done


6

Here are some suggestions: iTunes alternatives - linux I personally use Rhythmbox


5

I use gst123 as a command line player. Point it at the parent directory and it will shuffle through it and the child directories with the -z flag. I run it like this. gst123 -z ~/Music


4

You might try MPD it consists of a server backend and a separate frontend (which may but needn't run on the same machine). There are several great command line clients for it (see http://mpd.wikia.com/wiki/Clients)


4

There is moc - Music on console. It's simpler than mpd, but ships with embedded ncurses frontend. You can use ncurses TUI with mocp or talk to the server directly. Of course it can't do all the nifty stuff mpd can do, like network streaming, different outputs simultaneosly, etc. But as a simple console player on local machine it's pretty usefull. It works ...


4

The first application that I ever came across that could play .wav or .mp3 files was sox. It was available on Solaris 2.5.1 when I first found out about it. I believe it predates that as well. I was using sox in 1997. The wikipedia page has it pegged at 1991. Incidentally the app is named SoX, for Sound Exchange. excerpt from history section of wikipeidia ...


3

I like Clementine, it's a good clone of what Amarok 1.x used to be like before they (IMO) messed it up with the version 2.x release. On a more general note, pretty nearly anything is better than iTunes - Apple is usually excellent with user-interface design, but that program is an unusable abomination. I'd think "WTF were they thinking?" except that it's ...


3

For copying stuff into your iPod, use gtkpod, works for my iPod Shuffle at least For streaming, and support of spotify / last.fm etc., use clementine.


3

For simply playing music, I've never been able to go past Amarok. It's also possible to sync your iPod using it.


2

Mplayer should be able to play WMA radio. It's possible to set up firefox to direct mms:// URIs to mplayer by setting the firefox configuration setting "network.protocol-handler.app.mms" to /usr/bin/mplayer (or whatever the path is for mplayer).


2

The only thing I can think of is v to reverse selection (when nothing is selected this acts as select all), then A to add all selected items to playlist (select current playlist from the menu that pops up).


2

Looks like artist:owl%city does the trick.


2

There probably was no "first for Linux", the Linux kernel has been supplemented with userland programs collected from all over the place from the very start, the overwhelming majority of it originally developed for some propietary Unix system or one of the BSDs, and even in some case ported over from other operating systems. Much of this happened in ...


1

Probably you did not install corresponding gstream plugins. Without proper audio/video decoders, it won't play. MPlayer does not rely on this, so it works


1

There are different ways to play sound in Linux. There are: pulseaudio, alsa, oss, jack. There are also multiple higher level libs like: sdl, openal. Mplayer can use a lot of this and can select different way to access audio if one way doesn't work. Look into mplayer -ao help. Find out which ao works for you by logs and check by specifying ao explicitly. In ...


1

Yes, Amarok does have very good integration wind sync with Android phones. However, depending on your choice of DE, you may want to go with Rythmbox, since Amarok pulls in a lot of KDE libs along with itself. You may also want to check out mpd, the "Music Player Daemon". Remote clients for MPD are available, as are clients for live streaming to your ...


1

As already stated in the comments, you can do this rather easily using mpd and mpc: mpc listall | shuf -n 1 | mpc add; mpc play mpc listall will list all known songs from the music database shuf -n 1 (from coreutils) will print one random entry from that list mpc add will add this random entry to the current playlist mpc play will start playing (or do ...


1

No. The gracenote db is not publicly accessible. You have talk to http://www.gracenote.com/ directly to aquire a license to query their database.


1

If you run a Debian-based distro and a particular player is built without WMA support, you may try a build from debian-multimedia.org.


1

I just use mplayer. I generated a list of files from my music folders and mplayer can take that file as a playlist and play it in random order.


1

I've spent some time fiddling with diverse minimalistic music players and today find myself especially partial to the relatively recent xmms21, a descendant (somewhat) of the venerable xmms music player. It is a robust client-server application, designed to run full-featured from the command line or from multiple graphical clients, play practically any ...



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