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7

I don't believe that's possible. You could have two entries in /etc/passwd with the same user names but different UIDs, but the system would probably just ignore the second one (or misbehave in some way); arguably such an /etc/passwd file would be considered corrupt. When you login to the system, you're first prompted for your user name. Once you've done ...


6

Please have a look at bash manual: /etc/profile The systemwide initialization file, executed for interactive login shells /etc/bash.bashrc The systemwide initialization file, executed for interactive, non-login shells. ~/.bash_profile The personal initialization file, executed for interactive login shells ~/.bashrc The individual per-interactive-shell ...


6

There are two obvious answers: Give each user his own virtual machine image. Inside the virtual machine, the user has root access; outside the virtual machine, none at all. If your hardware supports it, kvm will work pretty well for this. And virtual machine images are just files, so they're easy to copy around, etc. You can use copy-on-write storage, ...


5

Don't dismiss RVM's value You can use the repository version of Ruby but I would recommend going another way and using RVM to manage Ruby. I realize it might seem like it's slowing you down, but the version of Ruby that's deployed via the repositories though usable will often lead to problems down the road. It's generally best to create dedicated versions ...


5

For Apache, see if http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/en/mod/mod_userdir.html#userdir and http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/en/howto/public_html.html helps.


4

Generally, one runs a server with no actual graphical display attached to it (maybe a very simple one for diagnostic work). Clients connect via a network protocol, either X tunneled over SSH or a remote-desktop protocol like VNC or RDP. With the former, users execute GUI programs from the remote shell and they show up seamlessly as windows on their client ...


4

This information is not stored by traditional filesystems. You have three main options: See who is accessing it in real time using lsof/fuser or similar; Set up auditing (take a look at auditd); Use something like LoggedFS.


3

You can use a configuration management system to do this. Personally, I use Puppet for this. I have a single /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow file and I have Puppet sync it across all my systems. There is an interesting learning curve with them, but definitely tutorials for doing exactly what you want on their website. I would, however, definitely recommend ...


3

Absolutely! From a security perspective separation is a Good Thing (tm) - as your professional and personal usage may have very different risk profiles. At work you may deal with code for clients, personal data for thousands of individuals, configuration of network devices etc., and that usage may be regulated (depending on your industry, employer, or ...


3

This happened to me too. I checked the ".xsession-errors" log on my home and it pointed to a permissions issue on $HOME/.cache/dconf/user, which I changed to be owned by my user and that fixed the problem. I hope this helps.


3

As far as I know, the only way to perform this is by activating auditd in your system. this way, it will log the access to all files and you can grep the logs files. Be careful as the logging will be "heavy".


2

Make sure you have Include conf/extra/httpd-userdir.conf and LoadModule userdir_module modules/mod_userdir.so in your httpd.conf.


2

For Yaws, you're looking for the tilde_expand configuration option. There is nothing magical about the ~ character, but it is so common that I wouldn't recommend trying to circumvent it. If you want to forgo it completely, then give users the ability to edit content in /var/www/htdocs/<username>/ themselves.


2

I haven't double-checked the API docs to be absolutely sure, but you can probably find a way to do this with PAM. It probably isn't even that hard. You may even be able to do it with the existing PAM modules. Not that you should. There are a lot of things which basically assume a name maps to one and only one user id. For example, getpwnam in the C library. ...


2

Great option :- you can try some more flavors also like xubuntu,lubuntu,and ubuntu unity Anyways Mint is also great and compatible with much devices their are some valid points also Cost cutting Linux is absolutely free Virus Free no need to install AV softwares Faster smoother and lighter believe me your experience will be awesome and some draw ...


2

Yes, you can do it with screen which has multiuser support. First, create a new session: screen -d -m -S multisession Attach to it: screen -r multisession Turn on multiuser support: Press Ctrl-a and type :multiuser on :acladd USER ← use username of user you want to give access to your screen Now, Ctrl-a d and list the sessions: $ screen -ls ...


1

Definitely go for Linux! Especially in a place where number of strangers will be using it... And I'd also suggest to make only terminals accessible for users (terminal server - terminal client model) to block them from physically accessing the machine itself. Users tend to browse in non secure sites, plug various USB devices with hell knows what evil living ...


1

Yes, anything is possible via software. You'd have to modify probably some significant portions of the kernel to do this. If you are talking about now....no. In fact you cannot allocate system swap space based on a given user at all. Another avenue of approach is not to allocate any swap space on on physical partition and carve out a large preallocated ...


1

since you are running a debian based distribution, the simplest way to install ruby would be to run the following as root (e.g. using sudo or whatever method you prefer): aptitude install ruby


1

My take on this is: Install Virtual Box and have your own personal environment on it. Yes it takes more resources, but you will not risk interfering with your professional things. this is what works for me, of course.


1

In theory, that's possible, but it's generally a bad idea, which explains why you won't find any ready-made program for it. What you're asking for is to have separate accounts with the same publicly visible identity. Since they are separate accounts, they have distinct true identities. Presented this way, it can be sensible (with the private identities used ...


1

Update this line in httpd configuration UserDir .www and ask users to create ~/.www directory themselves in their home directory if they want to share something over web. Ask them to share their files over http(scrutiny on themselves). In the load module section, add this line LoadModule userdir_module modules/mod_userdir.so In order to give each user ...


1

I would start by reading http://wiki.apache.org/httpd/PrivilegeSeparation


1

Method no. 1. It is possible to set up the diskless stations - nothing expensive - it have to simply run only a X server preferably with 2D acceleration (3D nowadays). On startup it gets a image from server, starts X login screen that present logging on server. The applications are run on server but they are displayed on thin client. To mess things up it ...



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