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6

You can use USB monitor. IIRC the Linux have support for those. You can also buy USB to VGA adapter. In any case there may be some problems with graphic card etc.


5

Matrox have little external boxes that will turn a single VGA into a double or triple VGA or DVI. I ran my laptop with my main laptop screen and 2 external screens using one. Not sure how well the linux drivers work though. I was using WinXP, the one after that, and OSX at the time on the Thinkpad T60. From a quick search: ...


5

The UltraVideo device If you look at the specs for that particular device it doesn't support Linux. Features Support Windows XP,Vista, Winodws 7,Windows 8, windows 8.1, Mac OS up to 10.9.4 (**Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server**) System Requirements Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server/Linux Other compatible devices? ...


4

Nvidia uses its own "TwinView" technique, are you sure you really use Xinerama? In case you do, give a try w/o it. UPD.: Reading man fluxbox: session.screen0.toolbar.onhead: <integer> For those that use xinerama, users can set this value to the number of the head where they would like to see the slit and toolbar, ...


4

Devil's Pie probably does the job, it can be configured to detect windows as they are created, and match the window to a set of rules. If the window matches the rules, it can perform a series of actions on that window. The last news entry there is 5 years old, but it's probably ok (based on EWMH, Extended Window Manager Hints). (Regarding automated ...


4

Xdmx is not that hard (though it will have issues here and there depending on hardware), and is a good, cheap way to add an extra monitor – you can use an iPad or any other device that supports running an X Server. IBM DeveloperWorks guide to Xdmx: Distributed multihead support with Linux and Xdmx EDIT: I've found it much more effective to run ...


4

I'm sure there's a better way, I think this is all handled by udev now but if you know that those commands will solve it, you could always just make them into a script: #!/usr/bin/env bash cvt 1600 1200 xrandr --newmode "1600x1200_60.00" 161.00 1600 1712 1880 2160 1200 1203 1207 1245 -hsync +vsync xrandr --addmode VGA-1 1600x1200_60.00 Make it ...


4

If you are using the Nvidia proprietary driver then nvdia-settings should be the GUI tool to configure the Xorg.conf file. It should have its own package in Linux Mint, so installing would be as simple as: sudo apt-get install nvidia-settings This should put an icon in your menu somewhere, you can run it from there (though I'm not sure how you get it to ...


4

Having a single Thunderbolt port does not mean that you can connect only one Thunderbolt display. Thunderbolt can be daisy-chained. Multiple displays are possible via a single Thunderbolt port. I do not know whether Linux supports daisy-chained Thunderbolt displays. And of course I do not know whether Thunderbolt daisy-chaining is an option for you, as far ...


3

Your color and flicker issues are probably due to a bad driver. You should check with your manufacture and distro to make sure you are running the latest drivers and whatever kernel is recommended as working best with them. Unfortunately some hardware manufactures to not reveal how their hardware works, nor provide good drivers for Linux. This leaves the ...


3

What if you switch client screen1 with 2 ? ------------ ----------- ------------ ------------- | client | | server | | server | | client | | screen2 | | screen1 | | screen2 | | screen1 | |----------| |---------| |----------| |-----------| This way you are able to set the right of cl scr2 to left of srv scr1 and ...


3

This can't be done with the configs yet. ( or at least last time I checked )... The closest you'll get to a sollution, without hacking into X, is to configure you screens like this: ------------ ----------- | server | | server | | screen1 | | screen2 | | | | | |----------| |---------| ------------ ----------- | client | ...


3

This isn't a direct answer to your question, but you might want to take a step back and consider why you want this feature. It may be because you are used to working in a particular manner under Windows, but you might find that Linux offers a different way to approach your tasks, which could be much more efficient and may not even require a taskbar! For ...


2

I have an Ubuntu system that I think matches what you describe. I have two displays, with each display having a separate menu and separate taskbar. Each display even has its own set of virtual workspaces. I can run Windows in a VMware session (or via RDP) fullscreen on one display and treat the other display as though it were a totally separate Ubuntu ...


2

Since Im a newb, I am only allowed one hyperlink. Here is a Google Doc with the correct links. No proven solutions, but here are some ideas: The kernel framebuffer draws the console if there is no X11. Perhaps you can exclude the second display from you X config? I think the way to go (think because I havent done this myself, I like the full screen term) ...


2

Current version of RandR protocol does not allow to use multiple graphic devices. It is expected to be implemented in RandR 2.0, but there is no estimate time of release (so do not expect it in the next two years). You might want to see (for example) here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RandR However, it might be possible to configure your monitors without ...


2

I use Gnome Classic, or Fallback as it's sometimes called, under Ubuntu 11.10. I have dual monitors, and on each can have as many panels as I want. The trick here is to keep adding panels on the primary monitor (in my case the laptop) until one appears on the external screen. Add as many panels as you want and move them to the edge you prefer, then delete ...


2

I had this same issue on a Radeon card. Fixed it when it happened by tweaking the gamma setting in Catalyst Control Center. Worth a shot if you're able to install AMD's proprietary drivers on your system.


2

If you look at the chipset datasheet, there are only two display planes and display pipes (see pp. 78–79). You can also take a look at the tables on pp. 86–87. So, you've hit a hardware limitation. You may be able to get it working if two of the displays are displaying the same thing, with the exact same settings (same image, resolution, refresh rate, bit ...


2

Distributed Multihead X - provided via the Xdmx server from the xorg-server package (or whatever your distro calls it). Xdmx page on Wikipedia Original DMX project page on SourceForge (from before it merged into X.Org)


2

One way is to create an udev rule, but as I wanted something more portable, I have this bash script. It relies on inotifywait support, does not have some kind of loops and is considered efficient. external-lcd.sh #!/bin/sh # inspired of: # ...


2

There is a bug in Xfce that always sets the left most monitor or the upper monitor to the primary monitor, if you reconfigure the monitors with xrandr. So you have to either move the panels and etc by hand, or move the monitor to the right.


2

Right click the panel, go to 'Panel preferences'. You'll have a dropdown for 'Output'. Change this from 'Automatic' to the display you want it to show up on. By default it will be on the left-most monitor.


1

xdotool Rough idea but you could achieve what you want by creating a couple of commands using xdotool. Then you could run them accordingly when you have 1 or 2 monitors connected. There's a pretty good example of how you could do this in this articled titled: Xubuntu – moving windows between monitors. excerpt from section: Moving the active window to the ...


1

Well, I just found shutter, a nifty tool that can do this. You can install on Debian-based systems with sudo apt-get install shutter Then, once you launch shutter, take your screenshot limiting it to the active monitor only: I just checked and it works perfectly on my LMDE running Cinnamon, it correctly took screenshots of the monitor where my mouse ...


1

The first 4 commands should happen in sequence and the next should not run until the prior one has completed. Since you're backgrounding the last 2 commands I'd be tempted to insert a sleep statement there. Using a sleep in this fashion is a bit of a hack but would allow you to confirm your theory by playing with the amount of time to sleep. Since it's ...


1

ssh forwarding does not forward the entire "session" (as in "Desktop") instead it forwards X-calls which then draw the window using your local window manager.


1

I purchased another card in an attempt to get what I wanted working, and it does! That card is an ATI Radeon HD 6970 with two DVI's and two active mini display ports. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202035 I currently have three monitors running with the performance I expected on Ubuntu 12.04. This was a true plug and play ...


1

Apparently this is due to a ground loop problem which exists on some laptops. Detailed explanation (and dirty fix) can be found here.


1

Look at my answer to this question. There is a number of basic "tricks": use auto-detection of the sync-rates (do NOT force these!) do not let X choose from different resolutions (here you have to force) configure a fixed colour-depth (24-bit seems to work best, force again) use "xinerama" and "cloning" (not a default setting)



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