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I wrestled with this apparent bug too. If you dual boot with Windows, and use a Microsoft wireless mouse, and have a motherboard that is always powered you get the problem in Linux. Briefly, Windows messes with the mouse transceiver configuration so Linux sees the wheel as scrolling way too fast, which it is after running Windows. The workaround is to ...


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I use the following settings in Mint 17.2 + Cinnamon, but I think it works in your environment as well. xinput list # to get the id of your mouse xinput list-props 10 # to list the properties of your mouse xinput set-prop 10 'Device Accel Profile' -1 # turns off mouseaccel xinput set-prop 10 'Device Accel Constant Deceleration' 1.5 # settings the sens I ...


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This is only a partial answer. Other folks should feel free to copy this as a basis for their answers. Touch screens input devices can be opened as simple mice, or with full access to their touch-screeniness via /dev/input/... and evdev stuff. You need to get your X server to use the input device as a touchscreen. The X server translates touch-screen ...


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Kubuntu is the only distribution that I know which had a setting for mouse scroll. Although, it is possible that any KDE-based distro make this setting available out-of-box. In Kubuntu 12.04 release, you can look into System Settings > Input Devices > Mouse > Advanced. The last line contains this option: Mouse wheel scrolls by: (Default is set to 3 lines). ...


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Some logitech mice have programmable buttons. Some of those have onboard storage to make profiles stored on the mouse. If you have access to a computer that can run Logitech's mouse setup software, you could make the mouse's USB keyboard component send multimedia-key presses (I think with autorepeat), instead of handling it in software on the GNU/Linux ...



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