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The third mouse button can be enabled system wide by adding a file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-3rdbutton.conf with the following content: Section "InputClass" Identifier "middle button" MatchIsPointer "on" MatchDriver "libinput" Option "MiddleEmulation" "on" EndSection I use this on my HP nc2400 with Fedora 23, and it works. The source of this ...


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I'd do something like: #!/bin/sh mxid=$(xinput --list --short | awk '/Razer/{gsub(/.*id=/, "");gsub(/[[:blank:]].*/, "");print}') bmap=$(xinput get-button-map $mxid) nmap=$(awk '{s=$1;$1=$3;$3=s};1' <<<$bmap) xinput set-button-map $mxid $nmap This assumes you know the "name" of your mouse (in my case it's Razer) and you know the default button ...


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Without providing the output of xinput list on your system, no one can offer an answer which you could use directly. That is because xinput can show different devices than illustrated in How do I swap mouse buttons to be left handed from the terminal?. For example, here's the output on OSX: $ xinput list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 ...


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If you need to toggle a state (and your reverse/unreverse the order of the mouse keys is such a state), of device you either have to be able to query the device for the current state, or keep the state in some file. As I couldn't find if xinput does have a way of asking a mouse for the button mapping, you should probably go with storing the state in a file ...


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You can put the command line into a file: #!/bin/bash xinput set-button-map 12 3 2 1 Once you have done that make it executable (if the file is named swap_buttons.sh): chomd +x swap_buttons.sh Now you can run the script with: ./swap_buttons.sh


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Use a name instead of a numerical ID. Run xinput list to see the available devices and xinput list-props to see a device's properties. See Make mouse movements scroll when the middle button is held down for examples. Alternatively, if this is your personal machine, you can set this up system-wide by adding a file in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. Again, see Make mouse ...


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My /etc/rc.local was wired. I deleted it. And now everything seems fine. #!/bin/sh -e # # rc.local # # This script is executed at the end of each multiuser runlevel. # Make sure that the script will "exit 0" on success or any other # value on error. # # In order to enable or disable this script just change the execution # bits. # # By default this script ...


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Control_L, Up, Control_L|Button4 Control_L, Down, Control_L|Button5 Shift_L, Up, Shift_L|Button4 Shift_L, Down, Shift_L|Button5 in your .imwheelrc should do the trick. Be sure to restart imwheel for the changes to take effect. Note that starting imwheel multiple times leads to undefined behavior. EDIT As per feedback from the OP, the key is to ...


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As seen in this Ubuntu answer. A missing mouse pointer in Debian Gnome might also be solved by entering "mouse" in the launcher. This starts the mouse and touchpad settings dialogue and the mouse appears again.


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Feature is called "Coasting speed". To disable it you can use: xinput --set-prop --type=float "<your device>" "Synaptics Coasting Speed" 0 0 to list devices you can use: xinput list alternative variant (for touchpads) is synclient options (there are 3 of them): CornerCoasting = 0 CoastingSpeed = 0 CoastingFriction = 0



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