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For gnome-terminal: In the menu bar, under Edit : Profile Preferences, tab General you will find Select-by-word chatacters. If you want the terminal to consider / to be a word boundary for selection purposes, remove / from the list of characters.


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xinput --query-state <mouse_id> This give you a state for all mouse buttons, that looks like this: 2 classes : ButtonClass button[1]=up button[2]=up button[3]=up button[4]=up button[5]=up button[6]=up button[7]=up button[8]=up button[9]=up button[10]=up button[11]=up button[12]=up button[13]=up ...


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Write SCROLL="-scroll 125" into etc/default/mouseemu. 125 is the keycode for the Apple key.


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Your cursor problem seems to be the constant while distros change, indicating that it may be a hardware problem. Attempt disabling drawing the cursor via hardware and then restart the X server. This may be done by editing your xorg.conf which is often located in /etx/X11/xorg.conf. Note that it may be also be split into several files under ...


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Please run chkconfig --list | grep mouse It should show something like this: mouse 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off If it does, it indicates that the service will not run on startup. You can make it run on startup using : chkconfig --add mouse OR chkconfig --level 35 mouse on Give it a try.


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The init.d scripts aren't run on login, so it's normal that it doesn't run if you just log out and in. They only run on boot, or when changing runlevels. /etc/init.d is the right place if the settings are global (shared amongst all users) and need only be run on boot. For simple tasks you may instead want to add the commands to /etc/rc.local, which doesn't ...


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xprop -root 2>/dev/null | sed -n '/^_NET_ACTIVE_WINDOW/ s/.* // p'



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