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18

Start the program xev in a terminal. Move the mouse inside the xev window; you'll see a lot of stuff scroll by. Press each button in turn. Then switch back to the terminal window and press Ctrl+C. xev shows a description of each input event, in particular ButtonPress and ButtonRelease for mouse clicks (you'll also see a number of MotionNotify for mouse ...


18

On modern-ish X.org installations, there is an XF86Ungrab keysym, which causes the server to release all active pointer or keyboard grabs. You can make the server break all grabs by generating the keysym either with a command or with the keyboard. With xdotool: xdotool key XF86Ungrab On some systems, the XF86Ungrab keysym is bound to the key combination ...


18

Try the following command : xdotool getmouselocation 2>&1 | sed -rn '${s/x:([0-9]+) y:([0-9]+) .*/\1 \2/p}' See http://www.semicomplete.com/projects/xdotool/


17

Mouse scrolling and elevators will work if you enable them in your .screenrc. Screen FAQ Q: My xterm scrollbar does not work with screen. A: The problem is that xterm will not allow scrolling if the alternate text buffer is selected. The standard definitions of the termcap initialize capabilities ti and te switch to and from the alternate ...


15

Assuming your GUI is X-based (as almost all UNIX GUIs are), use xinput. First, list your devices: $ xinput --list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] ⎜ ↳ Windows mouse id=6 [slave pointer (2)] ⎣ Virtual ...


14

In more recent gnome versions (e.g., gnome-shell), you need to use this instead: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences resize-with-right-button true Gnome defaults to using the Super ("Windows") key for window actions, so the above alone will enable moving (super-leftdrag) and resizing (super-rightdrag). To use the Alt key instead of the Super ...


13

xdotool exposes the pointer location (xdotool getmouselocation), and recent versions (since 2.20110530.1) indicate which window is at that location as well. None of xwininfo, wmctrl or older versions of xdotool appear to have a way to match a window by a screen position where it's visible. The underlying X library call is XQueryPointer (corresponding to a ...


13

First thing that we need to accomplish is turning off mouse, but only in X. For this we could use xinput. We need to discover input devices that are connected to computer (to X server): pbm@tauri ~ $ xinput list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave ...


12

On most systems :set mouse=a will enable your mouse inside vim even on the console. I personally prefer using the vim keybindings, but some variant on: :vmap <C-c> "*y :imap <C-v> <ESC>"*gPa :nmap <C-v> "*gP Will probably do what you want for ctrl-c and ctrl-v


11

Recent versions of X (X.org server ≥1.11) support several debugging keysyms, introduced in this commit. When triggered, these perform actions related to grabs. By default (at least in recent versions), these are disabled (absent from the default keymap). However, if you have xdotool installed, it is possible to call them, by executing on the command-line: ...


10

One more option is xinput. For instance, xinput test 8 would write motion a[0]=496 a[1]=830 motion a[0]=496 a[1]=829 motion a[0]=496 a[1]=832 motion a[0]=496 a[1]=834 upon mouse movement, where "8" is my mouse device number. Use xinput --list to find out the number of your mouse among devices.


9

The xwininfo command gives this kind of output, but you do have to click on the window you want info on: % xwininfo xwininfo: Please select the window about which you would like information by clicking the mouse in that window. xwininfo: Window id: 0xa0000d "flask" ... So doing: xwininfo | grep 'Window id:' might give you something ...


8

For linux (or at least the Debian family of distributions, e.g Ubuntu) there are the vim-gnome and vim-gtk packages. For Mac there is MacVim, for Windows gvim. Both are linked from the vim download page.


8

xinput --set-int-prop is deprecated. You should use --set-prop instead. Also, xinput --enable [device] and xinput --disable [device] can be used to enable and disable devices respectively. Here is a shell script I use to enable, disable, and toggle my laptop's touchpad: #!/bin/bash # Enables, disables, or toggles device device='AlpsPS/2 ALPS GlidePoint' ...


8

That you cannot install xdotool because you are not root doesn't mean you cannot run the program, for that you don't need any special privileges. Just download and compile from source. If you don't have access to a compiler then you can download the package for your system directly and extract the file from the package (for .deb first use ar, extracting ...


7

You can set this property with xinput. Run xinput list to see the list of connected input devices. Note the exact name or the number of the device corresponding to your mouse (not the “Virtual core pointer”, but something like “Logitech USB-PS/2 Mouse M-BA47”). The name depends on your mouse model; I think the number is assigned dynamically, so you might ...


7

This Windows feature has never really made its way into the Unix world. In the Unix world, the primary purpose of the middle mouse button is to paste the clipboard content (or more precisely, text selected with the mouse, which is auto-copied). A couple of cross-platform applications such as Firefox and Chrome that support Linux-style middle mouse button ...


7

Turns out this can be done via Firefox preferences. From the pull down menu: Edit --> Preferences Then select the tabs: Advanced --> general Then check "Use autoscrolling" Screenshot    


6

That's just the way that the PS/2 port works. Unlike the USB, the PS/2 was not designed to be hot-plugged. If you need the hot-plugging capability, use a USB mouse. Otherwise, there is no guarantee that any solution will work consistently.


6

I don't know of anything off hand for the passive grabs1 of a single key or button that may be present, but there are a couple ways to list active grabs of an entire keyboard or mouse device. On all platforms, but only with Xorg 1.11 and later (or an older version with the patch applied), map hotkeys to dump grab data to the log as described in these patch ...


6

better format: (sry 4 double answer) go to settings> setting editor click on xfwm4 in 'chanel side bar click on general to display tree list and find one called 'mouesewheel_rollup' click on to highlight and click edit icon at top of window its a Bool so all you need to do is uncheck enable box. save from: ...


6

On my ThinkPad X220T running GNOME 3 it's pretty easy to be typing along and accidentally bump the touchpad, causing some window other than the one you're typing into to be raised. Ostensibly, the solution to this problem is to click your name in the upper right, then click "System Settings", then "Mouse and Touchpad", and then "Disable touchpad while ...


6

mouse support is disabled by default, so something is turning it on. Likely the reason your set mouse= is failing is because it's running before whatever is turning it on. I'd look through the rest of your vimrc, and possibly the system wide vimrc (/etc/vim/vimrc is a standard location). As a last resort, you can do this really ugly hack which will cause ...


6

The feature you are talking about is called Auto-Scrolling. It lets you press & hold the middle mouse button and move your mouse to scroll smoothly. In Linux, the default behavior for this action (pressing middle mouse button) is generally used for pasting text. However, there is a preference setting in Firefox and an extension available for ...


6

The following has been copied verbatim from an answer that @Luke posted on Ask Ubuntu. I am posting it as a community wiki answer so the information can be on this site as well. KDE has not built this into its control center yet, but you can use xinput from the command line. First, run xinput list to find the device number of your mouse: $ xinput list ⎡ ...


6

According to this answer you can move the pointer of your mouse with command-line with the following procedure: First you need to find mouse input device with grep mouse /proc/bus/input/devices | grep event You should see something like H: Handlers=mouse0 event7 in my case. It could output more then one line if you have more then one mouse (e.g. ...


5

The answered question using xinput is the right one, but here is a quick one if all you are looking for is a simple screensaver type lock. I wrote this back in the '90s, and all it does is eat the X server's keyboard and mouse events, until you type the password. No feedback at all other than exiting when you type it correctly. ...


5

Having the middle button paste is a unix user interface standard, like having the left button select or activate, and the right button do something else (such as extending, toggling, firing up a menu, …). You'll find it bound to pasting in most unix applications. If your problem is that your mouse is overly sensitive when you put your finger on the wheel, I ...


5

There is MouseTrap from the GNOME project. Debian package name: gnome-mousetrap. Because of this bug it is at the moment unfortunately only usable in Debian stable. And there is also eViaCam, but it is not yet included in Debian (but there is a Ubuntu PPA). It seems to be more mature than MouseTrap.


5

I answered this on Super User, and am quoting it here: [As Gilles noted,] In fact, it is possible to do this (at least with recent versions of X). You can do this by pressing the XF86Ungrab key, introduced in this commit. By default, this keysym is not bound to any physical key or key combination (it was disabled in 2012 after it was ...



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