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Preface: There are a couple of reasons why this might happen and the question has already been asked several times here at Stack Exchange. Nevertheless none of the answers solved it (directly) in my case or were based upon false or outdated information. Many of those (rightly accepted) answers tell to change permissions or ownership of the configured ...


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Using mv for a file or folder within an NFS mount will apply the operation remotely. (See this list of API functions or this overview.) This example will execute almost immediately regardless of the size of the file, provided that dir1 and dir2 are part of the same mountpoint: mv /mnt/serverInEurope/dir1/file.txt /mnt/serverInEurope/dir2/file.txt Using mv ...


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To summarize the steps taken to get to the answer: According to the output given the NFS server does not like NFSv4 nor UDP. To see the capabilities of the NFS server you can use rpcinfo 10.0.0.100 (you might extend the command to filter for nfs by: |egrep "service|nfs") Apparently the only version supported by the server is version 2: rpcinfo 10.0.0.100 ...


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try to use this option .... nfs rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr 0 0


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After edit restart nfs-kernel-server On other linux distro i use another method, edit /etc/nfsmount.conf # Protocol Version [2,3,4] # This defines the default protocol version which will # be used to start the negotiation with the server. Defaultvers=3 Then restart nfs,this enable only nfs3


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When you mount a FUSE filesystem, by default, only the user doing the mounting can access it. You can override this by adding the allow_other mount option, but this is a security risk if the filesystem wasn't designed for it (and most filesystems accessed via FUSE aren't): what are the file permissions going to allow other users to do? Furthermore only root ...


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You probably made a disaster when you want to change something on lvm you must first do a full backup of volume with bacula,dd,tar,cpio,amanda,whatever you want. Then recreate the VG and lvm on new server and restore from backup for example OLD SERVER VG VG01 1 lvm / #simple case.. NEW SERVER VG VG02 1 lvm / #simple case.. recreate the VG02 on new server ...


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You still need to format the logical volume with some kind of filesystem. LVM just gets you to the point where you have one resizable volume instead of two fixed size volumes. Example: # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vol_grp1/logical_vol1 After that, try your mount command again.


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Your root filesystem is squashfs, which saves some flash space by compressing everything, but as a result is read-only. You can not mount it read-write. Instead, you reflash the device with a new squashfs image. If you need writable storage, you have to partition your flash and mount a second, writable filesystem, of which there are several intended for use ...


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find your user's UID id -u username find your user's GID id -g username in /etc/fstab none /home/rkmax/myapp/cache tmpfs defaults,mode=0775,uid=998,gid=999 0 0 resources http://askubuntu.com/questions/207180/changing-permissions-in-fstab-in-order-to-allow-writing-in-windows-ntfs-partitio https://kb.iu.edu/d/adwf


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Use lsblk to list block devices. It's likely that '/dev/sr0' is a read-only-media (rom) device. That should be what you seek.


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Finally found a workaround for this issue that works with our NetApp. If you don't need DFS try mounting with the nodfs option. mount -t cifs //server/share/directory /mnt/directory -ocredentials=/path/to/cifs.credentials,nodfs


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I would gate access to the filesystem through a directory that contains the mount point. As root: mkdir -p /media/group1only/workspace chgrp group1 /media/group1only chmod 750 /media/group1only This is full access to root and read+execute access for members of group1. Don't give them write access here, since if they accidentally rename the workspace ...


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For example, assuming the filesystem on the disk supports ACL's, and using the hypothetical user, myusername, and the hypothetical group for accessing the disk, diskusers, something like the following could be done. $ indicated a command executed as a regular user; # indicates a command executed as the user, root. Create a group to which a user may belong ...


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If the filesystem type is one that doesn't have permissions, such as FAT, you can add umask, gid and uid to the fstab options. For example: /dev/sdb1 /media/workspace auto defaults,uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=022 0 1 uid=1000 is the user id. gid=1000 is the group id. umask=022 this will set permissions so that the owner has read, write, execute. Group and ...


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You can see where the device is mounted with Disk Utility, it use to be mounted in: /lib/live/mount/medium You can't unmount the device but you can remount it with write permission: sudo mount -o remount,rw /lib/live/mount/medium Then maybe you wont be able to drag & drop files in directory but you can do it with terminal: mv file.txt ...


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There used to be an option to check ext2 filesystems at mount time, but that is no longer supported. Nowadays boot scripts check filesystems before mounting them, and your scripts should do so too. Mounting a filesystem does still check things to make sure it's safe to mount the filesystem; but it won't fix anything (beyond replaying the journal on ext3 or ...


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Shadowing files on a directory tree is what union mounts are all about. Linux offers several union filesystems; unfortunately, some are badly documented or unmaintained. For your use case, a FUSE-based solution that doesn't require privileges seems best. The most promising candidate would be unionfs-fuse. unionfs-fuse ...


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Ok, I feel very stupid. I rebooted the TimeCapsule and now it works. "Did you try turning it off and on again" was the solution. The reason was probably this: I switched the IP network range of my router from 192.168.178.0 to 192.168.1.0, so that the smbd on the TC probably got confused...


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You don't mount Audio CDs. You can read about it here Mount CD ROM in Linux at 4. Mounting Audio CD chapter. In order to listen to a music CD all what needs to be done is to insert music CD ( Compact Dics ) into CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive and fire up you favorite music CD player. In order to listen to Audio CD you can refer to this article Mplayer: Play ...


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You could try to use these commands in the terminal: mkdir /mnt/cd && mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Else try this in the terminal: sudo mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if mkdir works: mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if the directory has already been created: sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd ...


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Okay. I do not have a solution, but I think I found the cause. I can still BROWSE my HDD via Windows, but i cannot access any files, because they are reported with 0 bytes on disk. So either my file-system is corrupt, or I just invented the most efficient compression... (I do not think it is the latter ;) ) I do not know if it was caused by ntfs-3g or not, ...


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mount is a command, i.e. a program, i.e. userspace code. mount is a system call, i.e. kernel code. The mount command calls the mount system call to do the bulk of its job. In addition, it performs auxiliary tasks such as parsing its command line, consulting /etc/fstab, etc.


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Add shortname=lower to your mount options. Or at least, that's what worked for me.


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Unmount the USB-drive and open up a new terminal. First get the device name with: sudo fdisk -l (Example: /dev/sdb1) Create new a mount point: sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb Then mount the USB-drive back on with ownership set to you: sudo mount -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb/ In the command above, the only thing you have to change is the ...


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Incorrect POSIX permissions It means you don't have the execute permission bit set for script.sh. When running bash script.sh, you only need read permission for script.sh. See What is the difference between running “bash script.sh” and “./script.sh”? for more info. You can verify this by running ls -l script.sh. You may not even need to start a new Bash ...


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Volume group name should be unique on system, by design. Problem occurs when a disk is moved from a system to another. So you have few options (detailed below) rename the VG on the external [not mounted] disk(s). rename the VG of your system (not realistic) merge both volume group into a single one (probably needs to rename first) option 1 - rename the ...


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Problem is resolved with renaming of VolumeGroup. With this command: vgrename bwQkRq-mgph-9BYf-9WPF-cKz0-FLFq-0Qxs73 storage


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bsdtar (part of the portable libarchive [1]) can parse lots of file formats [2]. This is handy for those whose fingers are very familiar with tar's options (bsdtar xfp foo.iso to extract, bsdtar tf yoyoma.rpm to just inspect the contents). There's also a bsdcpio for those who are familiar with cpio's usage. Many linux distros now include bsdtar, bsdcpio ...


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Whenever I run into issues mounting CIFS shares I generally turn debugging on. See: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/LinuxCIFS_troubleshooting One thing I ran into recently is that actual Windows CIFS shares usually do not require the domain name. However, on a samba file share I have that authenticates (using kerberos) against a domain control you must ...


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In Ubuntu 12.04, mount -v has the same information than without -v (no NFS version). nfsstat -m shows the information about version.


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I'm sorry, but in all likelihood, the files were never written to the disk. Thus no recovery effort will help, even if you were willing to pay. Unmounting flushes the content of the disk write buffers from memory to the disk. If the buffers aren't flushed, the data is still only in memory, not on the disk. If you pulled the disk out while a write from ...


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There are two types of filesystem drivers: kernel or userland. Kernel filesystem drivers are the classical type. They are faster, but since they run kernel code, it is hard to control what they do. For this reason, by default only the system administrator (the root user) can mount a filesystem using a kernel filesystem driver. The administrator can ...


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First thing to do is mount /mnt on tmpfs. In /etc/fstab tmpfs /mnt tmpfs size=1M 0 0 That really should solve your initial problem (but I'm sure you'll have more to come!)


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If this is home work ...... Just create all mount points while the system is read write. Then mount read only. mount -o remount,rw / mkdir /mnt reboot should do the trick.


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In order to mount a ISO/BIN/CUE file as a loopback device (i.e. mount -o loop) the user must be a member of the group with which is assigned to the file. Additional methods of mounting the file are to set the SUID bit, assign the user to the cdrom group, setting the user/group combination as options within the /etc/fstab file etc. See 'man mount' for more ...


0

I'm not sure your question has a clean answer because of the way mounting impacts the system. I found this thread : Why does mount require root privileges? it mentions the way mounting can be used to gain root access to a system, thus it's generally locked down to the root user - so it's not really a cut and dry thing it would seem. However, I'm sure if ...


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There is not a -o force mount option for (v)FAT. A safe alternative is to image the sdcard and then do an fsck on the image. dd if=/dev/sdb1 of=~/sdcard.image dosfsck -l -w -a -r -v -t ~/sdcard.image mount -t vfat -o loop,ro ~/sdcard.image /mnt/sdcard


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My first comment is all of what you state will only work if the filesystem on the device you're interested in is currently mounted. But I guess you know that and accept that limitation. The method you propose seems quite thorough and I think it will catch all cases. About looking ip in /sys/dev/block: You're not looking for <maj>:0 as you state. ...


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The line header [< 4.777880>] says that this messages happened about 5 seconds after the previous one, it doesn't say for sure that mounting, by itself, took this long; intermediate, unlogged events may have happened in between (as Celada mentioned in a comment). On a recent boot of a Rasperry Pi, I see: [ 2.474306] EXT4-fs (mmcblk0p2): ...


0

To answer your question about out-of-the-box automounting: I wouldn't expect mounting to happen out-of-the-box without reference to your desktop environment (gnome). Debian 6 isn't that old. I've used LXDE from it or equivalent. The uselessly generic answer is that all desktop environments (DEs) will include a filemanager. Your filemanager will let you ...


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Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


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The best foolproof solution available in POSIX is the comparison of the files' device IDs provided by the stat(2) function. Perl has a similar stat function as Gilles pointed out: perl -e 'exit((stat($ARGV[0]))[0] != (stat($ARGV[1]))[0])' -- file1 file2 but the "POSIX way" is to use a C program like: ./checksamedev file1 file2 which source code is ...


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The GVFS documentation has a file about Controlling What is Shown in the User Interface. In short, you have two ways to do this: If it's in /etc/fstab, add x-gvfs-hide as one of the options (or, for older versions of udisks2, comment=gvfs-hide). Configure udev to set the $ENV{UDISKS_IGNORE}="1" for the relevant device. For example, here is how I hide ...


1

there are two 2Tb hard disks in RAID. Is there any way I can format them to one single partition on both drives and mount them to lets say /media/attachment For the purposes of this answer I am using /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. It is your responsibility to ensure that this matches your situation. You can do this provided you are happy to erase all the data ...


0

You want to have 2 separate disks or still in RAID1? For the first one use mdadm to remove the disks from the raid configuration and the you can use fdisk to create a partition on each of them. With LVM you then can combine them to 1 disk of 4TB.



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