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As I understand it, you want to see the files, if any, hidden by the mount /dev/sda1 /tmp/somefolder command. To do that, run: mount --bind / /tmp/anotherfolder ls /tmp/anotherfolder/tmp/somefolder


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From Wikipedia Buffers are also flushed when filesystems are unmounted or remounted read-only, for example prior to system shutdown.


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I was really rusty on this, and then it started coming back.. if this doesn't answer your question, maybe I misread it... Alibi: this is on an Ubuntu 14 release. Your mileage may vary. I use lsblk to get my mount points, which is different from mount For me lsblk is easier to read than mount Make sure that you have a directory created before you go to ...


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Note: It seems you need to mount a hfsplus as write/read, which is a bit problematic, because of it's journal function. However, you can mount it as write/read as seen here and here. The problem is that /dev/sde2 is mounted read only, according to the ro flag in the parentheses in the last line: /dev/sde2 on /media/dev/andre_clients type hfsplus ...


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your drive /dev/sdb1 is mounted in media_2e040 directory now so all the properties of media_2e049 are sdb1 properties. if you change them with touch you have changed sdb1 properties.


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Better than using sudo to unmount as root, just do: pumount /media/usb As man pumount says: NAME pumount - umount arbitrary hotpluggable devices as normal user SYNOPSIS pumount [ options ] device DESCRIPTION pumount is a wrapper around the standard umount program which permits normal users to umount removable devices ...


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As suggested in my question, it was a server-side change that needed making. I added these lines to /etc/smb.conf on the server: create mask = 0666 force create mode = 0666 directory mask = 0777 force directory mode = 0777 And now it works fabulously.


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When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


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The answers to this superuser question should answer your question. A few selected quotes: It will just be mounted, and the files disappear, coming back when the folder is umounted. ... It works like a stack, if you mount something else, it hides the previous content. When you unmount, the previous stuff becomes visible again. ... ...


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Line 1: Mounts Types: NetworkFileSystem, SambaFileSystems, and CommonInternetFileSystems on All Shared Paths to the Users Home Directory, Along with: Mount All Devices as a loop, Along with Unmounting, all Saved in the Array MOUNTING. Line 2: Prints the kernel dump from the last successful boot, saved in the Array SYSTEMDIAG. Line 3: If the User is logged ...


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I had the same problem a while ago. Solution: Fixing your configuration: create file /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/50-mount-as-pi.pkla with the following contents: [Media mounting by pi] Identity=unix-user:pi Action=org.freedesktop.udisks.filesystem-mount ResultAny=yes Fixing your init script: add a variable containing the user you would ...


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It seems we cannot switch a Linux partition online while there is opened file.


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As far as I know, you can't change the filesystem while the partition is mounted. You will first need to umount <partition name> and once that is done, you can use something like GParted to change the filesystem type to EXT4.


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After about 3 hours, I think I figured out why it is not working. Selinux context public_content_t is required for files shared via an FTP server, unless associated with a user home directory and looks like /var/ftp/pub does not qualify for home directory. After I mounted ISO file, the security context of rhel changed to system_u:object_r:iso9660_t:s0 and ...


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You can output the type of the filesystem that contains a given file or directory using stat -f --format="%T" /path/to/file and take action based on that. Some possible outputs are cifs, nfs, afs, … (presumed remote) and ufs, ext2/ext3 (sic - ext2, ext3, and ext4 have the same filesystem magic number), btrfs, tmpfs, … (presumed local). One thing that ...


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Here is the workaround I've been using. I have not experienced any hangs so far, after mounting the cifs share for several hours. The idea is simply to periodically write to a file on the mounted subtree. This seems to maintain things alive on both ends. #!/bin/sh -x mountpoint="/home/user/mount3/mount" if mount|grep ${mountpoint}; then echo lazy ...


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First, the command that you are using: $ sudo mount -t nfs 192.168.1.76:myshare ~/mount3/ would be better as $ sudo mount -t nfs //192.168.1.76/myshare ~/mount3/ And do not forget when using ~/ to say whatever it is mounted on your root dir if using sudo it will consider you as "root" and not any user remember this! And another thing you should ...


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I would try to protect against failures for several reason. A cron job that checks if the volume is mounted and then mounts it if it is not would accomplish this. Use I would create the script using the answer from Check if directory mounted with bash [closed] For the mounting in the bash script you are creating use Giles answer to modify your sudoers ...



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