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1

Your command is attempting to mount the device, rather than the partition. Instead of mount -t ext2 /dev/xvdb /mnt, try using: mount -t ext4 /dev/xvdb2 /mnt If you would like to automatically mount this partition at boot, you will also need to add the partition to your fstab file. You need to know the UUID of your disk, which you can find with ls -l ...


1

If you're running the mount commands inside the chroots, then from the perspective of the outermost root, there will be proc filesystems mounted on /proc, …/mychroot1/proc and …/mychroot2/proc. There's no problem with that, you can access exactly the same files through any of the mount points. No “kicking off” is involved. A number of files under /proc ...


0

The block device is read-only. You can't mount a filesystem read-write on a read-only device. You can make the block device read-write by running blockdev --setrw /dev/sda1. This won't work on devices that are intrinsically read-only because the driver has no write support (e.g. CD-ROM drive) but it should work for a device that appears as a hard disk like ...


0

I've solved the issue. In /media/X/<labelname>, X comes from environment variable LOGNAME


0

The idea is you can choose a mountpoint that is accessible. So try: mount /dev/sdX /target/blablabla -o rw,umask=0000


1

Why not use: isoinfo -R -X to extract all files or isoinfo -R -X -find find-options to extract files controlled by the find options?


1

Supposing your second HDD (160GB) is NTFS mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb /mnt/ Is there an error when you run this command?


3

See man fstab for the details on the fields. In short your line will be: //192.168.1.88/shares /mnt/share cifs username=USERNAME,password=PASSWD 0 0 See also man mount.cifs, especially the credentials= directive to keep the credentials apart from the fstab file.


0

If you're reinstalling anyway, you might want to just grab Ubuntu 14.04LTS. (or 15.04). /home contains the home directories for every user account on the system. It looks like you chose a different username when you reinstalled. From the ls output, I can tell /home/sougatapc has more subdirectories (higher link count), and is older (last mod time on the ...


4

The command du will show you the disk space used by your files and directory. du -sh /home/* will show you the size of each subdirectory directly below the /home directory, afterwards depending on your preferences you might then: Either run the same command against one of these directories to manually step one level lower (for instance du -sh ...


2

Your home folder contains two directories you own, /home/sougata and /home/sougatapc. The 182 GB you look for are these subdirectories plus possibly in an hidden one. To display hidden directories, use ls -la /home. On the other hand, unless you had a file system corruption and some files and directories were recovered with fsck, your lost+found directory ...


1

Since you listed /var/cache in /etc/fstab, a tmpfs filesystem is mounted to /var/cache during the boot sequence. Any contents of /var/cache are shadowed by the mount point. The files underneath a directory on which another filesystem is mounted still exist, but they can't be reached, since a path like /var/cache/foo goes into the other filesystem. For more ...


1

The mount hides, or shadows, anything already present in the given directory (this may cause fun problems if the permissions are wrong on the thus shadowed dir). So when the tmpfs mount is removed, the original stuff will be there. (If the cache will need to persist, you could mv /var/cache /var/cache.save, and then do rsync things after the tmpfs is first ...


1

Don't try to mount over /, make yourself a "new" (fake,read-only) one: I have done something similar. At the time I used AUFS, but this should also work with overlayfs and/or unionfs-fuse: make a folder (e.g.) ~/apps/_App1_FakeRoot Unionfs mount / (root) read-only under ~/apps/_App1 read-write on mountpoint ~/apps/_App1_FakeRoot. chroot into the FakeRoot, ...


3

Probably your NTFS volume is mounted with option noexec, which is the default enforced by permissions. See man ntfs-3g for details. You could selectively enable exec option by adding it to fstab. UUID=82440D36440D2F0B /media/federicop/Data ntfs-3g auto,users,permissions,exec 0 0 Run grep /media/federicop/Data /proc/mounts to know mount options actually ...


0

I found an answer . Just to let you know, even using an ubuntu live CD, might just not do it. I have used this useful link : # sudo modprobe ufs # mkdir ~/ufs_mount # sudo mount -r -t ufs -o ufstype=ufs2 /dev/sdb1 /home/<your_username>/ufs_mount as home directory name. sdb1 the drive desired to get into.. However you cannot write into a file in ...


0

If the boot disk is using UFS. You might be able to get away with using Escape to the loader prompt (3) from the boot menu and unload load kernel boot Then fix /boot/loader.conf and reboot. For ZFS, I believe you will need to boot the system from usb or cd. mfsbsd will do. zpool import zpool import -o altroot=/mnt {root_zpool_name} Edit ...


-1

This was my solution: With gparted format the USB, then on GESTIONAR OPCIONES I mark "boot"; then unmount it, put a new label and then select to make a new UUID. After that Multiboot recognized my usb and don't brought problem.


1

In an aufs union-mount, a branch and the mountpoint cannot be the same. Use this: mount -t aufs -o dirs=/mnt/home/lucyvanpelt=rw:/home/schroeder=ro none /path/to/mountpoint Normally if you want to merge 2 directories, you have to specify what should happen if something is written on it. As you can see, you can specify each branch with rw (readwrite) or ro ...


0

If you want it accessible all the time, chuck a line in your /etc/fstab. If you've already mounted it manually from the command line you should have all the settings worked out. # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass> # / was on /dev/sda1 during installation ...


0

After trying a lot of things, I found the solution: If I want to mount /home/user on a USB drive and keep all the files there after ejecting it, I have to first mount the USB drive like: mount -o uid=user /dev/sdb1 /hometemp Then, I have to mount the directory /hometemp on home/user like this: mount --bind /hometemp /home/user It works for me


1

You need to specify the filesystem when mouting. Try mount -t vfat /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 If you're format is fat32, mount -t ext2 /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 if it is ext2


2

You can do this with fstab, as long as you mark the mount as a network one. Just add _netdev to the options field.


1

/etc/default/tmpfs is for sysvinit, for systemd (Debian jessie default) you only need to do: systemctl enable tmp.mount


0

It could be a permission problem on the .iso file; check if you own the file. You can use ls -l command (list information about the FILEs) to find out the file / directory owner and group names. Also, related to the mount command, you can always specify the filesystem type: mount -t iso9660 archlinux-2015.08.01-dual.iso /media/iso Fuseiso isn't ...


0

either the files have been deleted, or somehow another device got mounted OVER your original mount point. Try displaying "/mnt/etc/fstab" for the original (elementary os) mounting information, and find out, from which partition "/home" originally came from. Then mount this partition to somewhere else, if not already mounted and search from there. Good ...


0

In /var/lib/lxc/Solr4StandAlone/config add a line reading: lxc.mount.entry = /mnt/ssd/solr_data /var/lib/lxc/webserver/Solr4StandAlone/rootfs/data none bind 0 0 Then lxc-stop stop your container and lxc-start your container again. That is all that is needed. ref: reference link


1

I have bad news for you: if I'm reading the code in http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/fs/efs/ correctly, Linux -- even the very newest version -- does not implement write access to EFS, probably because it was believed that the only use for a filesystem that old was to migrate data off of old disks.


1

Is Filesystem the mount point? You could try the mount -o remount,rw -t efs /dev/sdb1 Filesystem option to remount the filesystem as read-write.


0

Figured i might update this with my solution, I just ended up building Openwrt from source, and included the required packages in the build, and now it works fine.


4

To disable the writing of access times, you need to mount the filesystem(s) in question with the noatime option. To mount an already mounted filesystem with the noatime option, do the following: mount /home -o remount,noatime To make the change permanent, update your /etc/fstab and add noatime to the options field. For example. Before: ...



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