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2

The link /dev/$disk points to the whole of a block device, but, on a partitioned disk without unallocated space, the only part which isn't also represented in /dev/$disk[num] is the first 2kb or so - $disk's partition table. It's just some information written to the raw device in a format that the firmware and/or OS can read. Different systems interpret it ...


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FUSE doesn't have any generic support for the remount option. In 2006 with FUSE 2.6 this was described as impossible to do for a FUSE-based filesystem without patching FUSE itself (fuse-devel thread “Remounting in FUSE support”). There doesn't seem to have been any progress since then. There are requests for remount support in SSHFS (e.g. Ubuntu bug ...


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async is the opposite of sync, which is rarely used. async is the default, you don't need to specify that explicitely. The option sync means that all changes to the according filesystem are immediately flushed to disk; the respective write operations are being waited for. For mechanical drives that means a huge slow down since the system has to move the ...


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Since /tmp is a separate filesystem, you want to get an unblemished view of the contents of that filesystem (without the interference from the /dev/sda1 filesystem, which is mounted on the subordinate /tmp/FOO mount point), so you need to do a bind mount on /tmp: mount --bind /tmp /tmp/BAR Now /tmp/BAR should show you the contents of /tmp, and ...


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As I understand it, you want to see the files, if any, hidden by the mount /dev/sda1 /tmp/somefolder command. Assuming that /tmp is part of the / filesystem, run: mount --bind / /tmp/anotherfolder ls /tmp/anotherfolder/tmp/somefolder If /tmp is not part of / but is a separate filesystem, run: mount --bind /tmp /tmp/anotherfolder ls ...


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From Wikipedia Buffers are also flushed when filesystems are unmounted or remounted read-only, for example prior to system shutdown.


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I was really rusty on this, and then it started coming back.. if this doesn't answer your question, maybe I misread it... Alibi: this is on an Ubuntu 14 release. Your mileage may vary. I use lsblk to get my mount points, which is different from mount For me lsblk is easier to read than mount Make sure that you have a directory created before you go to ...


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Note: It seems you need to mount a hfsplus as write/read, which is a bit problematic, because of it's journal function. However, you can mount it as write/read as seen here and here. The problem is that /dev/sde2 is mounted read only, according to the ro flag in the parentheses in the last line: /dev/sde2 on /media/dev/andre_clients type hfsplus ...


2

your drive /dev/sdb1 is mounted in media_2e040 directory now so all the properties of media_2e049 are sdb1 properties. if you change them with touch you have changed sdb1 properties.


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Better than using sudo to unmount as root, just do: pumount /media/usb As man pumount says: NAME pumount - umount arbitrary hotpluggable devices as normal user SYNOPSIS pumount [ options ] device DESCRIPTION pumount is a wrapper around the standard umount program which permits normal users to umount removable devices ...


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As suggested in my question, it was a server-side change that needed making. I added these lines to /etc/smb.conf on the server: create mask = 0666 force create mode = 0666 directory mask = 0777 force directory mode = 0777 And now it works fabulously.


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When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


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The answers to this superuser question should answer your question. A few selected quotes: It will just be mounted, and the files disappear, coming back when the folder is umounted. ... It works like a stack, if you mount something else, it hides the previous content. When you unmount, the previous stuff becomes visible again. ... ...


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Line 1: Mounts Types: NetworkFileSystem, SambaFileSystems, and CommonInternetFileSystems on All Shared Paths to the Users Home Directory, Along with: Mount All Devices as a loop, Along with Unmounting, all Saved in the Array MOUNTING. Line 2: Prints the kernel dump from the last successful boot, saved in the Array SYSTEMDIAG. Line 3: If the User is logged ...


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I had the same problem a while ago. Solution: Fixing your configuration: create file /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/50-mount-as-pi.pkla with the following contents: [Media mounting by pi] Identity=unix-user:pi Action=org.freedesktop.udisks.filesystem-mount ResultAny=yes Fixing your init script: add a variable containing the user you would ...


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It seems we cannot switch a Linux partition online while there is opened file.


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As far as I know, you can't change the filesystem while the partition is mounted. You will first need to umount <partition name> and once that is done, you can use something like GParted to change the filesystem type to EXT4.


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After about 3 hours, I think I figured out why it is not working. Selinux context public_content_t is required for files shared via an FTP server, unless associated with a user home directory and looks like /var/ftp/pub does not qualify for home directory. After I mounted ISO file, the security context of rhel changed to system_u:object_r:iso9660_t:s0 and ...


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You can output the type of the filesystem that contains a given file or directory using stat -f --format="%T" /path/to/file and take action based on that. Some possible outputs are cifs, nfs, afs, … (presumed remote) and ufs, ext2/ext3 (sic - ext2, ext3, and ext4 have the same filesystem magic number), btrfs, tmpfs, … (presumed local). One thing that ...



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