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Dolphin makes use of the Solid namespace to detect devices. As long as you have the correct drivers installed for your disks, they should still be discovered even after an upgrade to a new version of Fedora. You can use lscpi to check the drivers or have a look at this StackExchange answer for some other tips. Though as far as I know, drivers aren't ...


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nobootwait worked very well for me in Linux Mint until version 18. I miss it. Using nobootwait could result in writing to your OS drive rather than a mounted drive, but only if you are careless. If you always write to a folder on your mount, then if the mount fails the folder will not exist and the write fails.


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Serge's comment made me do my homework - study the man page in more depth than before. The solution was simply to enter in the shell losetup (without any arguments). Then, afterwards, losetup -f resulted, successfully, in /dev/loop0


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I found a solution to systems error kernel not loading Use live cd to gain access to your existing installation. Once in reinstall Linux kernel : pacman -S Linux Then delete the fstab file from etc/fstab : rm /etc/fstab Now reinstall systemd: pacman -S systemd When reinstalling systemd it will automatically generate a new fstab file Now reinstall ...


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A quick look at the manual page shows: password=arg specifies the CIFS password. If this option is not given then the environment variable PASSWD is used. If the password is not specified directly or indirectly via an argument to mount, mount.cifs will prompt for a password, unless the guest option is specified. So, ...


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For those who use Thunar file manager on linux and want easy and fast solution: Open thunar --> Edit --> Configure custom actions... Create new item: Name: Extract ISO here Description: Extracts ISO file Command: xfce4-terminal -e "7z x %f" Open tab Appearance Conditions Prefix: *.iso Select only Other files checkbox Save it and you are ready to ...


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Maybe this could do the trick: findmnt | grep "\[" Example: $ mkdir /tmp/foo $ sudo mount --bind /media/ /tmp/foo $ findmnt | grep "\[" │ └─/tmp/foo /dev/sda2[/media] ext4 rw,relatime,data=ordered


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I would recommend using autofs to mount the drive (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Autofs) in a standard location (eg. not their home-dir). Default for autofs is /run/media/$username/$media-title. udev to restrict permissions (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) and a symlink to allow the user access to the drive from their home-dir. An excerpt ...


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Turns out modifying the RPCMOUNTDOPTS variable as described in /etc/default/nfs-kernel-server does not work and there's a bug report for that: #738063 This variable is used in the rpc.mountd call: # systemctl status nfs-kernel-server ● nfs-kernel-server.service - LSB: Kernel NFS server support Loaded: loaded (/etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server) Active: ...


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sshfs is using sftp under the hood and the umask for creation new files is handled by the remote sftp-server. You can set umask as an argument to the sftp-server in /etc/ssh/sshd_config on the server, such as Subsystem sftp /usr/lib/openssh/sftp-server -u 027 # Debian/Ubuntu or Subsystem sftp /usr/libexec/openssh/sftp-server -u 027 # RHEL/Fedora ...


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I had this problem on a machine running a standard Ubuntu 14.04 install. The connection refused message can be misleading: It turns out that all that was required was to install the nfs-common package.


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You can mount two filesystems on a single mount point and there are actually a few ways of doing this and almost all live CD distros use them. But first you have to decide how you want to handle writes. If you need both filesystems to be merged and appear as one with all the files from both systems available but the writes going to only one of the ...


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It is theoretically possible to make such a FS, but I doubt it already exists or has any real potential with the constant increase of drive size and the huge file size support on all modern systems. One way that you could split your partition in two would be to set up a RAID 0 array (using mdadm) with the two separate files (on loop devices) and then copy ...


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Problem #1 was caused by SELinux. Since I don't need it for this system, I simply disabled it. Problem #2 was caused by a udev setting (specified in systemd script) that makes the udev namespace keep a 'slave' copy of the mount flags. Changing this to 'shared' fixed the problem. See a more detailed answer here: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/154318/...


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I would like to thank jasonwryan for pushing me in the right direction. At this stage, I'm sure I'd be able to install Arch blindfolded and drunk, but without his help I would not have progressed far. How I solved my problem: I've used EaseUS Partition Master under Windows to create a partition for Arch. I've tried using parted and gdisk on the live ...


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This is a solution I've pieced together from various sources (namely http://tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-faq/#unprivileged) - it's rather long, but it works at least on wheezy and jessie: open terminal donwload source: $ apt-get source ntfs-3g enter package source directory (name may vary) $ cd ntfs-3g-2014.2.15AR.2 change package config to use ...


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Solved by using fsck on the diskdrive in question


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Answering my own question after some more searching: I understand that this can't be done like this because mount_smbfs is FreeBSD-specific and it hasn't kept pace with samba features available in Linux (whereas smbclient has). This isn't quite the end though. You can run a virtual Linux machine in a jail on FreeNas and then connect to the Time Capsule ...


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You can't mount /dev/sdb, because it is part of a multipath map, thus considered "busy". You can use /dev/mapper/mpatha instead, but you probably don't want that, because the underlying devices are partitioned. So create the partition devices first (unless they are present already) and mount those: # kpartx -avp-part /dev/mapper/mpatha # mount /dev/mapper/...


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According to Mark Cohen's answer, you need some kind of change permission action. But simple sudo chmod 777 javalib will crash with another permission denied. You need to add mount options -o username=guest,dir_mode=777,file_mode=666 to make directories executable for everyone. If this method won't help, then you may need to add options, such as -o uid=$(...



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