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1

There isn't an equivalent for mount, and there is no default or standard way to do what you want. You'll have to write one. Here's a script fragment that shows one way of doing this: dev="/dev/$PARTITION" mp="/media/$USER/$LABEL" if [ $(mount | grep -c "^$dev \| $mp ") -eq 0 ] ; then sudo mount "$dev" "$mp" fi This uses grep -c to count how many ...


2

You can redirect the output to /dev/null. sudo mount /dev/"$PARTITION" /media/"$USER"/"$LABEL" &> /dev/null


9

Well, it really depends on how read-only you want the pool to be. And no, that's not a joke. First, a bit of terminology: in ZFS, you import a pool, and optionally mount the (any) file systems within it. You can import a pool without mounting any file systems by passing -N to zpool import and then later on mount any desired file systems using zfs mount. (...


0

source What is meant by mounting a drive? Before your computer can use any kind of storage device (such as a hard drive, CD-ROM, or network share), you or your operating system must make it accessible through the computer's file system. This process is called mounting. You can only access files on mounted media. Formats and mounting Your ...


2

I too would be wary about using directories which are managed by automounters like that. I think /media/ used to be shared by all users, it wouldn't have been so much of a problem... but it seems ugly to use it now, at least on systems like yours. There is not one best practice. E.g. read: Preferred mount points for internal HDDs A subdirectory of /mnt ...


1

That is up to you, the system administrator, to determine those conventions but it is indeed a good idea to make sure the mounting points can not conflict with anything else. Considering that the mounting point is dynamic in this case, it would be even safer to do them in another level of sub-directory such as /mnt/usb or something similar.


2

Use the gui to mount the encrypted directory, then login to the synology as root over ssh and type mount. You will see a line like /volume1/@mycryptdir@ on /volume1/mycryptdir type ecryptfs (rw,relatime,ecryptfs_fnek_sig=88...,ecryptfs_sig=88...,ecryptfs_cipher=aes,ecryptfs_key_bytes=32) This shows your directory /volume1/mycryptdir is implemented on an ...


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It should be closer to what you want if you add some more options to the end of your fstab entry: ,uid=testuser,gid=sftponly


1

This is how I do with schroot command on Ubuntu version 10.04 upward: # list all sessions: schroot --list --all-sessions # if the above command does not work, just type `mount`. The bind mount # points with something like this in the mount path is the session name you want to get: precise-a4aac8e0-663c-4fec-8fb2-16e4b06557e3 (<chroot_name>-<id>) ...


3

You've misunderstood a little; the two mount points are equal in terms of permissions, flags, etc because the bind effectively redirects access from one path to another. But they are still distinct. If you look at /proc/self/mountinfo you'll see the kernel view of the mount world for this process (namespaces make things more complicated; there's not just ...


0

Umount it, and make the mountpoint more permissive. Sometimes this is relevant... maybe it is in your case because using a different mountpoint has different results. Compare the permissions on those 2 directories for more info. Check man ntfs-3g for options, and use them, for example: mount -o fmask=664,dmask=775,uid=1000,gid=1000 /dev/sde1 /home/craig/...


2

Mounting another file system seems like a lot of work to me. Is there something wrong with using a symlink to elsewhere? As for moving the whole of /var off the SSD, if /var is "supposed to hold frequently changing junk", that would seem like an argument for keeping it on the SSD.


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For some reason the mount.ecryptfs_private call is failing, so it's not able to mount the eCryptfs folders it tried to set up. I'm not sure why, but checking man mount.ecryptfs_private it reveals some info like: mount.ecryptfs_private is a mount helper utility for non-root users to cryptographically mount a private directory, ~/Private by ...


0

You have a number of problems: The noauto flag is telling mount to ignore this line for -a mounts. You would be able to manually attempt the mount with mount /mnt/shares/NASDisk3. If you want to have this mounted at boot time then remove the noauto flag. Your umount syntax is wrong; it should be umount -t cifs. Otherwise you are trying to tell the ...


2

Look at live distributions with persistence for an example of this. Not all union mount methods work with the root directory. Amongst those that do are unionfs, aufs and overlayfs. Overlayfs is the way to go on modern Linux systems. In overlayfs, you get the union of the lower filesystem and the upper filesystem, with the upper filesystem taking precedence ...


0

DragonflyBSD user here. If I recall correctly, FreeBSD's UFS and DragonflyBSD's UFS are not compatible. FreeBSD added a number of features to their version of UFS, such as soft updates, which are not supported under Dragonfly. If you have two machines, you might find it easier to simply NFS export the drive from the original FreeNAS machine or transfer ...


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Try doing umount -a within the chroot environment; Then, exit and umount -l if umount -R fails. (chroot) # umount -a (chroot) # exit (liveos) # (liveos) # umount -R /mnt/point/ (liveos) # umount -l /mnt/point/ -R, --recursive Recursively unmount each specified directory. Recursion for each directory will stop if any unmount ...


1

In Unix everything is a file. These files are organized in a tree structure, beginning at the root /. Your filesystem or filesystems will then be mounted at the appropriate places in your / according your /etc/fstab file. This file contains information about your filesystems, which device they belong to and to which point they will get mounted to - the ...


1

Dolphin makes use of the Solid namespace to detect devices. As long as you have the correct drivers installed for your disks, they should still be discovered even after an upgrade to a new version of Fedora. You can use lscpi to check the drivers or have a look at this StackExchange answer for some other tips. Though as far as I know, drivers aren't ...


0

nobootwait worked very well for me in Linux Mint until version 18. I miss it. Using nobootwait could result in writing to your OS drive rather than a mounted drive, but only if you are careless. If you always write to a folder on your mount, then if the mount fails the folder will not exist and the write fails.


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Serge's comment made me do my homework - study the man page in more depth than before. The solution was simply to enter in the shell losetup (without any arguments). Then, afterwards, losetup -f resulted, successfully, in /dev/loop0


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I found a solution to systems error kernel not loading Use live cd to gain access to your existing installation. Once in reinstall Linux kernel : pacman -S Linux Then delete the fstab file from etc/fstab : rm /etc/fstab Now reinstall systemd: pacman -S systemd When reinstalling systemd it will automatically generate a new fstab file Now reinstall ...



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