New answers tagged

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Thank you for the link in your comment, JigglyNaga. From there I found that my command du -hs bin shows the disk usage of the contents of the directory. There are actually two separate images mounted on each of the two mount points (mount1 is partitioned, mount2 is just a pure ext3 filesystem). According to the link in the comment, if I want to check the ...


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Like Jose Luis Martin suggested use blockdev, my 2cent is to do a remount rw and forcefsck (assuming sda is your disk) blockdev --setrw /dev/sda mount /dev/sda -o remount,rw touch /forcefsck


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I just solved a similar issue. I wanted to mount a few users ```/home/username```` dirs from nfs, but have a couple others live on the local disk. Unfortunately, when trying to use the local disk directory, I was running into permissions errors. After some research, I read man auto.master 5 a bit more carefully, and found this: For direct maps the mount ...


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Following worked for me on Linux Mint with Sony Mp3 Player and hidden files that I could not delete otherwise: sudo fdisk -l # To located usb device Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sdb1 7 944127 1888242 b W95 FAT32* #Note: 32bit sudo umount /dev/sdb1 sudo mkfs.vfat -F 32 -I ...


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It should work flawlessly if you don't forget to plug the drive again before resuming the computer.In case you forget to plug in the external USB drive, then you could get an error or undefined behavior of the program(s) that were tracking and using your drive before suspending the computer.


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Looking in /media is a reasonable way to find hotplug block devices. You can also use lsblk to list the block devices and whether they are hotpluggable: $ lsblk -l -p -o name,rm,hotplug,mountpoint NAME RM HOTPLUG MOUNTPOINT /dev/sda 0 0 /dev/sda1 0 0 / /dev/sda2 0 0 [SWAP] /dev/sda3 0 0 /home /dev/sdc 0 1 ...


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There is no difference between internal and external devices, so no, there's no better way than to hope mounting has been consistent enough that all external devices (and only those) are mounted under /media. But a user with the right permissions can easily mount e.g. an USB stick anywhere.


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This can happen because FAT (both 16 and 32) stores the partition geometry near the start of the first sector (63 and 90 bytes resp.), while the MBR stores it near the end. That makes it possible to have both written at once. GRUB's stage 1 supports both, so it has "unused" areas in both of these places. But in your case, the structures are apparently ...


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The command mount /dev/sda12 /acctdata will mount partition #12 of disk sda to /acctdata. Therefore, the answer is "the filesystem can be accessed on /acctdata". Could the answer be /etc/fstab since it reads the content of the /etc/fstab configuration file to see if the given file system is listed? No, /etc/fstab is used to list partitions that must ...


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I've worked it out (I think). After reading about using gvfs-mount I found I could mount the share from the command line using: gvfs-mount 'smb://10.0.0.2/nick/' So now it was a case of doing that automatically. I used "Startup Applications" for this: Then I added an entry for each desired disk: Each entry looked like this: That seems to ...


4

You're looking in the wrong place, because this isn't really to do with the mount command itself. What you're doing is mounting a special filesystem, in this case, a cgroups hierarchy, and the options happen to be how you attach different cgroup subsystems like cpu or memory. Red Hat* has some good documentation on cgroups in general and the mount options ...


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You can use GNU stat on Linux: stat --file-system --format=%T /tmp/subdir/whatever tmpfs


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So I made a mountinfo parser […] You're better off using setmntent() and getmntent() that are provided in the GNU C runtime library. My approach was to convert the mount options into the appropriate mountflags and to give special options straight to data […] What you need to do is take the mnt_opts given to you by getmntent() and ...


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Some of the parameters given to mount(8) are translated to flags specified in the mountflags parameter to mount(2): sync is MS_SYNCHRONOUS; dirsync is MS_DIRSYNC; relatime is MS_RELATIME; rw is the default, so it can't be specified; ro would be MS_RDONLY.


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lsblk is using /proc/$$/mountinfo . strace lsblk 2>&1 | grep /proc open("/proc/self/mountinfo", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 7 lstat("/proc", {st_mode=S_IFDIR|0555, st_size=0, ...}) = 0 lstat("/proc/self", {st_mode=S_IFLNK|0777, st_size=0, ...}) = 0 readlink("/proc/self", "755", 4095) = 3 lstat("/proc/755", {st_mode=S_IFDIR|0555, st_size=0, ...}) = 0 ...


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This appears to be a bug in older versions of LVM. A bug that could be corrected by compiling from source with a different set of flags to add support for thin devices. I can not speak for the SystemRescueCD you mentioned, because I have never used it, but it may be using an older version of LVM, for whatever reason, which may have this very bug. Since ...


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Finally found the answer from somebody else on another site, just zeroed the inodes and rechecked the system, that was all! debugfs -w /dev/sda2 :clri <1415> :clri <1416> :clri <1417> :q fsck -y /dev/sda2 To anybody else with this issue, I found my bad inodes using find on the bad mount, then checked dmesg for errors on the bad inodes.


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You can start with isoinfo -J -ls to list the Joliet names instead of the default ISO-9660 names but this gives badly readable output. A better readable result is achieved with isoinfo -J -find -ls, as this presents the directory tree in a more usual way. You of course also can extract all files from an ISO image using: isoinfo -J -X and if you like to ...


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When a child process is created with clone with the CLONE_NEWNS flag, the child process gets its own mount namespace. Mounting operations (mount, umount, mount --bind, etc.) in the child namespace only have an effect inside that namespace, and mount operations in the parent namespace only have an effect outside the new namespace. Except, that is, for shared ...


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You need to install ntfs-3g and fuse : yum -y install ntfs-3g yum install fuse modprobe fuse Create a mount point : mkdir /mnt/win Now , run the following command: mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/win


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There are several other utilities that can be used to copy files without modifying their timestamps. rsync (especially, using the '-t' flag) and cpio (using the '-m' flag) can both be used in this case. Check out the manual pages for each to see what other options might be useful.


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The command cp -P doesn't apply to your needs. You are using uppercase argument letter -P which is used to never follow symbolic links. What you want to use is lowercase to preserve timestamps: cp -p As described in the comment section of the question, using the correct gid and uid solved the problem: sudo mount -t cifs //mynas/folder /home/mnt/nas/ ...


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edit your /etc/fstab with this below line, you don't need to mention the address again. 192.168.178.4:/shares/OwnCloud /eStore nfs auto,_netdev,noatime,nolock,bg,intr,tcp,actimeo=1800 0 0 You can mention the credentials username=User,password=Pass also


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The drive names are (on a typical Linux system) decided by udev.How it decides which hardware maps to which block special file is an implementation detail that will depend your udev configuration, kernel configuration, module setup, and many other things, too (including plain luck). Typically udev will assign the first letter to whichever device it detects ...


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If nfs-client is trying to mount exported share inside linux container then container should run in privileged mode. In case of docker; $ docker run -it --rm --privileged ubuntu:14.04


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You should probably do some sort of delay loop (with a maximum iterations) that sleeps for 1 second, then checks whether the directory /dev/disk/by-label/backup_disk now exists. The following should work, but you may need to debug it. #!/bin/bash set -o errexit set -o unset $DIRECTORY=/dev/disk/by-label/backup_disk # do your reformat here until [ -d ...


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du is for disk usage; it is showing that you are using 100G. Rather than du, use df -h; it will report used and available space.


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du shows occupied space. To show the total, use df.


3

I think mount does not support this use of user with the default fuse security setting (or allow_root). I think the resulting permissions are the same as if you used sudo mount. To allow access by multiple non-root users, you could set allow_other, allowing access by any user. If this raised concerns, it would be possible to set default_permissions to ...


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How come we have many ways to do this but as always we also take into consideration and do not know where the file system used in the device may hinder a little, but we can use the "auto" option to give a little help. mount -t auto /dev/sdb1 /media/pendrv and ready our device will be mounted: at /media/pendrv ready to use, then simply use: umount ...


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On Ubuntu 14, you can also use Disks app: First click on the disk on the left panel and then click on the partition on the right panel. The bottom of right panel shows format, current mounting status etc. You can also use this GUI to create/delete/format partitions.


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Generic FUSE options 1) I noticed allow_other wasn't set on the ntfs-3g filesystem mount. The default for FUSE is not to allow access by other users. mhddfs is a FUSE filesystem and so is ntfs-3g (but see next section). 2) When you use allow_other, you also want to consider permissions checking. The default for FUSE is not to check permissions. So just ...


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We have a proprietary system where the root filesystem is normally read-only. Occasionally, when files have to be copied over, it is remounted read-write: mount -oremount,rw / And then remounted back: mount -oremount,ro / This time however, mount kept giving the mount: / is busy error. It was caused by a process holding an open descriptor to a file ...


1

This is because the device files you find in /dev aren't actually mount points *. They're just handy filesystem-based references to access the devices themselves. You can see a similar sort of hierarchy under /sys — particularly, look in /sys/block. Why is something like /dev/sda a special type of file rather than a directory under which there are ...


1

I believe Unix V1 would be run from a single disk. It had no real VFS. You can find the system filesystem at the root of the namespace, /. No indirection required; no SYSTEMROOT = c:/windows variable. Remember this was hand-written assembly code. Minimalist ideas were very useful. The ideas here are often described in terms of their elegance. I want to run ...


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It's a convention. Simply called Filesystem Hierarchy Standard. There is nothing more to it. http://www.pathname.com/fhs/


2

PLEASE NOTE If you already have the Debian 8 version of VirtualBox installed this may not work. If you need VirtualBox installed and working for other virtual images this may break that. You can manually install the wheezy versions of the required packages. Download the following .debs for your architecture: libgsoap2 virtualbox virtualbox-fuse Use ...


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In the future to prevent this issue I highly recommend using partition UUIDs (as opposed to /dev/sdX naming) in your fstab. It's super easy to do and will make your life easier, especially for automounting any drives that are likely to change location or might simply be plugged/detected in a different order. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/fstab#UUIDs ...


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All my fault. I'm the idiot here.. plugged in another 1tb hdd and it just so happens to be on a lower numbered sata port than the ssd so it took sdc and pushed the ssd to sdd. :(


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if you are able the find the system detected USB stick with fdisk -l command then try the below command to mount mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /media/USB


4

Because any directory is valid mountpoint The content of the latest mounted share will be listed AFAIK you cannot. The latest mount will be unmounted firstly # mkdir testmount # mount --bind /bin/ testmount/ # mount --bind /usr/bin/ testmount/ # mount |grep testmount /bin on /testmount type none (rw,bind) /usr/bin on /testmount type none ...


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I was possible with overlayfs: mount -t overlay -o "lowerdir=/original,upperdir=/overlay,workdir=/tmp/workdir" overlay /mnt/target Where /original is untouched, /overlay is the result of changes on /mnt/target over /original, thus /mnt/target is the result of files in /original plus files in /overlay. The /tmp/work is a control directory, it is necessary ...


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Someone added a lot of option for that share or that entry was created automatically. It is saying "mtab is bad" because one or some of the options is not correct. For instance, the option unc=\\...\abc abc contains a space character, you should quote that value. Options are separated by comma, a space in one of the values will end the "options" field. You ...


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It is possible to modify a squashfs image without extracting its contents, but there are limitations. If you specify an existing squashfs image as the destination parameter for mksquashfs, without specifying the -noappend option, it will attempt to add additional files from the specified source parameters. It appears that mksquashfs attempts to generate a ...


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First check if the usb is detected at all. Let's give you an example... Without connecting the USB pendrive: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT mtdblock0 31:0 0 16M 0 disk mtdblock1 31:1 0 7.5G 0 disk / Now with the pendrive connected: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT ...


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There would be a lot of Linux ways and you can write simple bash script and send it to all of your client by rsync command and also you don't need edit fstab if you don't want permanently un mount it.Command umount /dev/sd? will help you. You can prepare a file that contains your machines IP and you can pass those one by one by using cat command to your ...



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