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0

In my case works using nfs4 doing: $ sudo mount -t nfs4 server-name:/ /path/to/mount In the /etc/export file on server /Path/to/export 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,fsid=0,no_root_squash,crossmnt,no_subtree_check,no_acl) fsid=0 makes the /Path/to/export the root directory when you mount the share. crossmnt, because I have some others drives in the ...


1

Try changing options => "-o loop", to options => "loop", The error shows mount -o -o loop so you'd want to get rid of one of the -o arguments


0

There are two labels involved and different filemanagers may show either label: Partition Label parted /dev/sdb name 1 MyBook will rename the first partition on /dev/sdb to MyBook. Filesystem Label e2label /dev/sdb1 MyBook will rename the filesystem label on ext2/3/4 installed on /dev/sdb1. Different utilites are needed for other filesystems.


0

My bad, my mount command was incorrect. Should've been $> sudo mount -t exfat -o uid=plex,gid=nogroup /dev/sdc1 /media/chris/plex_disk/


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It turns out the issue is that systemd ignores everything inside /dev/block. The /dev/block/ec2/ephemeral0 was a symlink created by a udev rule, so the solution is to simply adjust the udev rule and put the symlink somewhere else. I chose to place it at /dev/disk/ec2/ephemeral0 instead. $ udevadm info -q symlink -n /dev/xvdb ...


0

Mounting filesystems is reserved to root by default, because many filesystems allow a user to gain privileges if they control the disk image (e.g. by creating setuid files). Look for a FUSE filesystem implementation that supports the filesystem in your image. FUSE filesystem drivers run in userspace with no privileges, unlike in-kernel filesystem drivers. ...


1

Among other things, it's possible to obstruct/overlay filesystem structures with mounts, thus you're not usually allowed to mount anything anywhere without root privileges. The cases where this is done (or seems to be done), there usually is a mount helper involved that runs as root (like fusermount, udisks, ...). If for some reason using a mount helper is ...


0

This looks more like a permissions problem to me than a read-only filesystem. From the pi, can you make the /export/data directory temporarily world-writable? If so, can you now write from the client? When you create a file this way, who is the owner? Without no_root_squash, your root user is mapped to nobody. Otherwise, you'll need to map the user from ...


1

Quoting OpenTheFile : V2I is a disk image backed up from a current volume using Norton Ghost. It contains a base backup of everything on the hard disk, and may be mounted as a new volume or restored to another disk using Norton Ghost. Because of the last sentence, I would be tempted to say that this format can only be handled by Norton Ghost. ...


-1

I believe VirtualBox has an option to directly enable mounting of your physical DVD. Directly mounting won't work, because here Virtual Box needs to emulate ur DVD.


1

I saw the same error (mount.nfs: access denied by server while mounting...) and the issue was fixed by -o v3 option as follows: $ sudo mount -o v3 a-nfs-server:/path/to/export /path/to/mount Server is Ubuntu 14.04 64bit LTS. Client is CentOS 6.5 64bit.


1

I think you want something like this: (until findmnt . ; do cd .. ; done) The problem you're running into is that all paths are relative to something or other, so you just have to walk the tree. Every time. findmnt is a member of the util-linux package and has been for a few years now. By now, regardless of your distro, it should already be installed on ...


2

I have realized that the reason why /dev/dvd was not being read was because of a setting that I had turned off on VirtualBox. I experimented a little bit and was able to mount the drive after that point. The setting I had to turn on was the .iso file found in Devices, DVD/CD in VirtualBox. I turned it off earlier because it kept taking me to the ...


0

debian Gnu/Linux is supposed to mount HFS+ automatically, and 'just work'--it even has all the packages pre-installed typically. You may need to install hfsprogs and any other "hfsp..." packages you are missing. I've seen disks like yours plug-n-play into Debian. The support for hfs+ has reportedly (I will post a link, can't find it at the moment) been ...


1

It can be somewhat messy if the mount points contain blanks, but this should work except in cases where the mount points contain newlines: #!/bin/sh mountpoint="$(df -P "$1" | awk '{ if (NR==1) i=index($0,"Mounted on"); else print substr($0,i); }')" mount|grep " on ${mountpoint} type " df -P outputs one line for the filesystem; ...


1

I don't know of a command, but you could create a function. You can add the below to your .bashrc: mountinfo () { mount | grep $(df -P "$1" | tail -n 1 | awk '{print $1}') } This executes the mount command and passes the output to grep. grep will look for the output of df -P "$1" | tail -n 1 | awk '{print $1}', and to break it down: df -P "$1" will ...


1

The Linux/Unix way is to have a toolbox of small utilities that, when combined, give you the results that you're after. They tend not to have an utility for every occassion. Instead you have many small useful utilities that are combined together with pipes etc. The advantage of this is that you can write your own utility quite easily if none are available. ...


1

You may want to add -t FILESYSTEMTYPE, with FILESYSTEMTYPE being auto, ext4, ntfs or any other valid system type. Which gives you mount /dev/dvd /media -t auto, by example.


1

Iso isn't synonym for read only, under some circunstances, you may wish to mount an iso read/write (when creating a boot media). If you want read only, use option mount -o ro,iso


0

mount -o rw,remount /foo will remount /foo mount point rw. If there is a /foo/bar mount point (whether ro or rw), the mount command will likely fail. If there are /foo/what and /foo/ever directories, those will be rw as well. If your read-only mount point is /foo /bar /baz then mount -o rw,remount /foo will keep other mount points read only.


0

I found a way of editing the /etc/fstab config file so that you can create a bind mount: /my/real/dir /to/mount/dir <filesystem> rw,bind 0 0 none - No options associated with mount point (like quotas) rw - The mount point is read and writeable. bind - The mount point is a bound directory filesystem - ext2,ext3,vfat,etc.


3

Your arrays are not properly started. Remove them from your running config with this: mdadm --stop /dev/md12[567] Now try using the autoscan and assemble feature. mdadm --assemble --scan Assuming that works, save your config (assuming Debian derivative) with (and this will overwrite your config so we make a backup first): mv /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf ...


0

Run Wireshark to obtain a trace of the network activity. Start capturing in Wireshark, attempt a mount, then stop capturing. Wireshark can analyze and sort network traffic. Use the filter tcp.port >= 137 && tcp.port <= 139 to select NetBios traffic. There are smb.* filters to view specific messages in the SMB protocol.


1

Not sure to understand, If the question is: could some process have keep an acces to my file after umout ? , then the answer is no, as you can't umount if someone/something access your file.


1

If the system has access to the underlying block device, yes, in theory you could read the filesystem files, but! this is cumbersome, and can cause more problems than it's worth, specially if you try to write it. In short, yes, if a OS have access to the block device it's always possible they can read specific files if they know their position in the ...


1

It was probably mounted by udisksd. Look in syslog. On my system, inserting a USB stick results in this: Aug 6 15:17:08 ubuntu udisksd[2856]: Mounted /dev/sdb1 at /media/mp/A88B-3652 udisks tries to provide a unique name for each drive or partition. It searches through all the symlinks that udev creates under /dev/disk. For removable media, it looks at ...


4

The longer number is called a Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). It is specified by the filesystem. There is a good Wikipedia article that gives more information on why and how it is used. FAT filesystems are identified with a shorter ID (the "Volume serial number"). Wikipedia suggests it's actually a timestamp.


1

In the end, I've followed the advices of @frostschutz. I've used an encrypted LV as key ! lvcreate -L 4M -n LogVolKey vg cryptsetup luksFormat /dev/vg/LogVolKey (here we set the global passphrase) cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/vg/LogVolKey LogVolKeyDecrypted dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/mapper/LogVolKeyDecrypted cryptsetup luksFormat /dev/vg/LogVolXxx (here we ...


0

Store the common files with a owner unknown to any of the users. (some admin user). When userA is downloading a common file, change the ownership of the file from admin to userA. By this way, userA will assume he is the owner of the file. After the file download is complete, revert back the permission of file to admin user.


1

Don't know what OS you are using; but FreeBSD best-practice for this sort of thing is to use glabel to attach a label to the file system. Then the labels appear as /dev/ufs/[label] and you use that in your fstab specification. For example, if these are USB devices and they all autoconfig alternatively to /dev/ad0s0a, /dev/ad2s0a, and /dev/ad3s0a, you can ...


1

As far as I'm aware mount doesn't scan past the first match. One thing you could do (should consider?) is to set-up udev rules that create the same symlink for all your NTFS disks under /dev ... then a single line in fstab will do for any/all of them.


0

Only Few Packages which needs to be Installed and You are done. Install and configure the EPEL Repository wget http://epel.mirror.net.in/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm rpm -Uvh epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm Install the packages related to NTFS Mount: yum -y install ntfs-3g ntfsprogs Attach NTFS drive and find and mount partition: mount ...


-1

Simple: ntfsfix /dev/partition


2

The link /dev/$disk points to the whole of a block device, but, on a partitioned disk without unallocated space, the only part which isn't also represented in /dev/$disk[num] is the first 2kb-4mb or so - $disk's partition table. It's just some information written to the raw device in a format that the firmware and/or OS can read. Different systems interpret ...


1

FUSE doesn't have any generic support for the remount option. In 2006 with FUSE 2.6 this was described as impossible to do for a FUSE-based filesystem without patching FUSE itself (fuse-devel thread “Remounting in FUSE support”). There doesn't seem to have been any progress since then. There are requests for remount support in SSHFS (e.g. Ubuntu bug ...


4

async is the opposite of sync, which is rarely used. async is the default, you don't need to specify that explicitely. The option sync means that all changes to the according filesystem are immediately flushed to disk; the respective write operations are being waited for. For mechanical drives that means a huge slow down since the system has to move the ...


1

Since /tmp is a separate filesystem, you want to get an unblemished view of the contents of that filesystem (without the interference from the /dev/sda1 filesystem, which is mounted on the subordinate /tmp/FOO mount point), so you need to do a bind mount on /tmp: mount --bind /tmp /tmp/BAR Now /tmp/BAR should show you the contents of /tmp, and ...


1

As I understand it, you want to see the files, if any, hidden by the mount /dev/sda1 /tmp/somefolder command. Assuming that /tmp is part of the / filesystem, run: mount --bind / /tmp/anotherfolder ls /tmp/anotherfolder/tmp/somefolder If /tmp is not part of / but is a separate filesystem, run: mount --bind /tmp /tmp/anotherfolder ls ...


1

From Wikipedia Buffers are also flushed when filesystems are unmounted or remounted read-only, for example prior to system shutdown.


0

I was really rusty on this, and then it started coming back.. if this doesn't answer your question, maybe I misread it... Alibi: this is on an Ubuntu 14 release. Your mileage may vary. I use lsblk to get my mount points, which is different from mount For me lsblk is easier to read than mount Make sure that you have a directory created before you go to ...


1

Note: It seems you need to mount a hfsplus as write/read, which is a bit problematic, because of it's journal function. However, you can mount it as write/read as seen here and here. The problem is that /dev/sde2 is mounted read only, according to the ro flag in the parentheses in the last line: /dev/sde2 on /media/dev/andre_clients type hfsplus ...


2

your drive /dev/sdb1 is mounted in media_2e040 directory now so all the properties of media_2e049 are sdb1 properties. if you change them with touch you have changed sdb1 properties.



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