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0

Haven't found a way to make the changes permanent yet, but at least there's a way to manually change drivers: For example with my sony walkman: Plug it in and find out its vendor and product id with lsusb: # lsusb Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0402:7675 ALi Corp. Bus 001 Device 025: ID 054c:04be Sony Corp. Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation ...


0

udisks AFAIK the reactions to plugging/unplugging of a USB storage device are handled by udisks (http://udisks.freedesktop.org/docs/latest/). So you would have to configure (udev and) udisks for a simple storage area the same way they are configured for USB. Unfortunately I cannot tell you how to do that. But the application should not care about the ...


0

For the first part, you do not need to use "ChipGenius", the only thing you need is the VendorId and ProductId of your device then look for the chip used by your device using an online web site that gather this kind of information such as http://flashboot.ru/iflash/ To get vendor id and product id just use lsusb. Example: Bus 004 Device 012: ID 1f75:0917 ...


-1

This will fix it permanently: # mdadm -Es > /etc/mdadm.conf # dracut -H -f /boot/initramfs-$(uname -r).img $(uname -r)


3

No. /etc/fstab is consulted when mount is called. It's just a text file. It's also used implicitly by the init system at boot time, most likely via mount -a: -a, --all Mount all filesystems (of the given types) mentioned in fstab (except for those whose line contains the noauto keyword). From man 8 mount. Note that if you have some kind of ...


0

In addition to the items mentioned above, a driver or other program can cache data from a device. On a read-write device, such as a hard disk or thumb drive, data written to the device may not have been written yet. Journaling file systems can also require flushing the journal before it doesn't see the device anymore. Then you've got filesystems that overlay ...


2

You could specify the path on the FTP server after hostname part in the original command of curlftpfs. For example, you could have your command as, curlftpfs user_name:password@hostname:/var/www/public_html ~/mnt/sitename References http://askubuntu.com/a/323215 http://askubuntu.com/a/200812


1

The question title asks: Why do we need to mount on Linux? One way to interpret this question: Why do we need to issue explicit mount commands to make file systems available on Linux? The answer: we don't. You don't need to mount file systems explicitly, you can arrange for it to be done automatically, and Linux distributions already do this for most ...


0

Well, I don't have time to follow @derobert's advice and run strace on the thing at this moment (other tasks await). For the current release, I've simply added -t iso9660 to the mount command after the cdrecord call, which gets around the problem nicely. Given that my software just recorded the cd, I can be quite certain that the filesystem is iso9660 in ...


0

I was able to solve this issue. I downloaded and installed Multisystem USB Creator and once I created a liveUSB with this tool I was able to boot into the live media and do an install of Zorin OS. It seems as though the other live media creators for a USB we at fault in the creation of the media. I'm not technical enough to explain why this is the case ...


0

In Unix/Linux there are no CDs, USBs, FDs. There are just files and directories, so I don't quite understand what exactly is what you want to acomplish. If you want to read music from a USB that music will be in a directory (usually udev will detect the insertion and according to the predefined rules some actions will be taken, like for instance mounting ...


0

It looks like @slm has some wonky math, or at least doesn't match the fdisk -l output. From the revisions it looks like adding the u parameter to fdisk changed from cylinders to sectors? Dunno, but it doesn't do anything on mine since the default should be sectors. On my image: $ fdisk -l bone-debian-7.5-2015-01-14-beaglebone.img Disk ...


0

Simply mount /dev/disk2s1 /foo Where /foo is an empty directory where you want to access the card. The normal mount point for disks on a mac is within /Volumes but since it isn't auto-mounting, you will need to create a directory somewhere. Don't mount it directly to /Volumes or you won't be able to access your HD, including your OS. You could mount it ...


0

You should be able to use install -o apache -d /my/test/directory but as usual, you'll need to be root to create files/dirs with somebody else's ownership. (At that point, you could as easily sudo -u apache /bin/bash to gain a shell as the apache user.


0

It does so because there is, with many media for desktop and laptop UIs, ambiguity about what to do when the media is inserted, because user intuition is that inserting the disk in the physical box with which the user interacts is not different to, say, inserting it into a device next to the computer that has a network connection. Thus in the fundamental ...


1

Because /dev/cdrom is a device, whereas /media/cdrom is a filesystem. You need to mount the former on the latter in order to access the files on the CD-ROM. Your operating system is already automatically mounting the root and user filesystems from your physical hard disk device, when you boot your computer. This is just adding more filesystems to use. All ...


0

You just want to mount your usb to a different folder? That folder name apparently contains a / which is one of the few characters not allowed, congratulations on finding one! And do you want the " characters too? Either way, changing the middle / into a - you could do (as root probably): mkdir Debian\ GNU-Linux\ 7.7.0\ Wheezy\ -\ Official\ amd64\ DVD\ ...


3

I think about this in the following manner: mount is a tool that tells the system to interpret the contents of some files as directory trees. The filesystem has directories and files, and each file is a label for some string of bytes. /dev/cdrom is a file, it represents the string of bytes stored on the CD. You can read this very long string directly, but ...


2

In addition to 에이바's answer, you may want to place the credentials in a specific file called .smbcredentials in your home directory for a little more security. This is a good practice especially for multiuser systems. This way you will be protecting your cifs password. Create a file: /home/myname/.smbcredentials and include just two lines: username=myname ...


3

I'd call it historical reasons. Not that the other answers are wrong, but there's a bit more to the story. Compare Windows: Windows started as a single-computer, single-user OS. That single computer probably had one floppy drive and one hard drive, no network connection, no USB, no nothing. (Windows 3.11 had native networking capabilities; Windows 3.1 ...


3

Many database engines can work directly with raw disks or partitions. For example, MySQL: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/innodb-raw-devices.html This avoids the overhead of going through filesystem drivers, when all the DB engine really needs is one huge file that fills the disk.


1

Each line in the /etc/fstab file contains the following fields separated by spaces or tabs: file_system dir type options dump pass A typical mount point added in /etc/fstab would look like the following: # <file system> <dir> <type> <options> <dump> <pass> /dev/sda1 ...


12

Basically, and to put it easily, the operating system needs to know how to access the files on that device. mount is not only "giving you access to the files", it's telling the OS the filesystem the drive has, if it's read only or read/write access, etc. /dev/cdrom is a low-level device, the operating system functions wouldn't know how to access them... ...


6

For consistency Imagine you have some partitions on the first hard drive in your system. For example, /dev/sda2. You later decide that the drive isn't large enough so you purchase a second one and add it to the system. All of a sudden, that becomes /dev/sda and your current drive becomes /dev/sdb. Your partition is now /dev/sdb2. Using your proposed ...


5

There are several advantages to the current arrangement. They can be grouped into advantages of block special files and advantages of mountpoints. Special files are files that represent devices. One of the Ideas that unix was built on is everything is a file. This makes many things simple, for example user interaction is just file reads and writes on a tty ...


46

One reason is that block level access is a bit lower level than ls would be able to work with. /dev/cdrom, or dev/sda1 may be your CD ROM drive and partition 1 of your hard drive, respectively, but they aren't implementing ISO 9660 / ext4 - they're just RAW pointers to those devices known as Device Files. One of the things mount determines is HOW to use ...


0

You can't do that with the Linux bind mount kernel feature. But you can do it with the FUSE filesystem bindfs. Bindfs is slower than bind mounts and doesn't pass extended attributes, but on the flip side, it can be used by non-root users and on Unix variants other than Linux, and most importantly for you, allows simple transformations of ownership and ...


2

Yes it does. The main point is that the source and destination folders have to exist prior to attempting the mount. You also need to be superuser. Also read up on bind-mounts, as there are options to them too.


2

Yes. Well, I've made a quick test on my system, mounting a NTFS partition from Windows onto a directory in a XFS Linux partition, and it worked okay. You have to do this operation as root.


2

You have a space between "ro," and "remount". Try without this space.


0

For persistence to work you'll need the two parameters (persistent and casper-rw) that are indicated here: http://askubuntu.com/questions/168246/why-isnt-persistence-working-on-lubuntu-12-04-live-usb/568557#568557 As for the Data partition, if it comes second [1] you'll need to swap the partitions number for Windows to let you have access to it. A very ...


0

You can invoke mount in multiple ways such as the SYNOPSIS section in man mount describes: mount [-lhV] mount -a [-fFnrsvw] [-t vfstype] [-O optlist] mount [-fnrsvw] [-o option[,option]...] device|dir mount [-fnrsvw] [-t vfstype] [-o options] device dir In the same man page in the DESCRIPTION section it states: If only directory or device is ...


0

I have noticed flash drives dont like to be changed from their native fs. Rather use a tool to create a bootable flash drive, perhaps use a disk image? pendrivelinux has a whole bunch of different tools. Yumi is great for multi-oses and it supports persistence on some linux distros. The mounting permissions problem probably has to do with what is ...


1

I know this is rather old but in Debian-type distributions setting Set RAMTMP, RAMRUN and RAMLOCK in /etc/default/tmpfs (/etc/default/rcS or before wheezy) does the same job.


0

Late in the party, but I don't want to see the not so interesting ones (i.e. non-physical) If by physical, you mean block devices attached to your PC, go with $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sdb 8:16 0 238.5G 0 disk ├─sdb1 8:17 0 100M 0 part /boot ├─sdb2 8:18 0 1G 0 part ...


1

A list of file system using a block device as backing storage can be obtained from /proc/filesystems. For example you could use it as follows: mount -t "$(grep -v '^nodev' /proc/filesystems | cut -f2 | paste -s -d ,)" Since you want both file systems backed by a block device and network file systems, it does not completely eliminate the need to maintain a ...


13

Do not use mount. From man mount: The listing. The listing mode is maintained for backward compatibility only. For more robust and customizable output use findmnt(8), especially in your scripts. Note that control characters in the mount‐ point name are replaced with '?'. Use findmnt, ...


4

The -t option for mount also works when displaying mount points and takes a comma separated list of filesystem types: mount -t ext3,ext4,cifs,nfs,nfs4,zfs I am not sure if that is a better solution. If you start using (e.g. btrfs) and forget to add that to the list you will not see it and maybe not miss it. I'd rather actively filter out any new ...


1

Do not use the -v switch. Use: mount | grep -Ew 'ext4|ext3' This will show you only ext4 and ext3. If you want to view more filesystems, add them to the regex. For example, to view ext3, ext4, cifs and nfs mounts, use: mount | grep -Ew 'ext4|ext3|cifs|nfs'


5

How about: mount | grep '^/[^/]' Mount points relating to physical disks will always start with a / since the first field is the path to a device. cifs mounts will start with // so exclude lines with a second / to ignore them. Update I misread the question, I thought you wanted to exclude cifs and nfs. Try this instead: mount | grep -E '^[^ ]*[/:]'


3

You can't create a directory on a read-only filesystem. But you can mount a filesystem on any existing directory. The fact that the mount is read-only doesn't affect that, and the directory doesn't need to be empty or to have particular permissions or anything. You can mount a filesystem on /Volumes itself if you're only going to mount one.


1

What happened? So I spent some time looking into this and I am fairly sure that this is caused by a kernel bug. The bug is triggered by the fact that you have an NTFS filesystem on the root of the disk (ie the filesystem begins right at the start of the disk). Usually the root of the disk will contain a partition tables and the filesystem(s) would be within ...


1

First make sure that the partition you need to replace is at least the same size as the one you will copy. If your image files are not compressed, they can be mounted as loopback file systems using kpartx. Copying file systems across disk images You'll need LVM2 for this to work. Let disk1.img and disk2.img, assuming both images are the exact same size in ...


2

The /sys filesystem (sysfs) contains files that provide information about devices: whether it's powered on, the vendor name and model, what bus the device is plugged into, etc. It's of interest to applications that manage devices. The /dev filesystem contains files that allow programs to access the devices themselves: write data to a serial port, read a ...


0

I'm not familiar with the device but here are a few ideas: Could usb-modeswitch handle turning the device back into mass storage mode? There are several mtp fuse filesystems. Maybe they will be more compatible than gvfs.


5

You can read or write /dev/cdrom (eg, using dd or cat) but when you do that you are just reading or writing the raw bytes of the device. That can be useful in various circumstances (like cloning a partition), but generally we want to see the directories and files stored on the device. When you mount a device you're basically telling the kernel to use a ...


3

/dev/cdrom refers to a device file. This is not the contents of whatever disc you might wish to insert into your optical drive, but rather it is a reference to the bit of hardware (and probably software drivers) that you might call on to show that to you. When you mount /dev/cdrom to some path in your tree you attach its contents to your file system. The ...


0

As you stated in your last comment, if I understand it correctly, that the partition mounts fine on both SPARC and x86 running Solaris 11, you can be sure this is not UFS. Big endian UFS used on SPARC hardware doesn't mount on x86 hardware and reciprocally. That leaves hsfs, pcfs and ZFS as potential contenders, and perhaps udf too. The simpler way would ...



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