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1

If your company policy allows you to use CIFS then please make sure cifs utility is installed. # lsmod |grep cifs cifs 293313 3 if not then install it # yum install samba-client samba-common cifs-utils or # yum install cifs-utils After installing CIFS utility you should be able to find mount.cifs command. To mount while booting ...


1

If I plug in a USB and modify files and unplug it I don't lose data. Correction: you haven't lost data yet. That you've noticed. Presumably you, your distribution or the maintainer of the automounting program that you use has configured removable USB storage devices to be mounted with the sync option, which causes data to be written out immediately. ...


3

When Linux detects a removable drive, it's smart enough to know that it should flush the data frequently. When you're mounting a loopback, it doesn't know that the backing device is a file which could be removed at any time. You can force the system to not cache writes using: mount -o loop,sync /media/your-usb/test.bin m This will result in slower ...


0

As can be seen by the fdisk command, the partition table was all messed up. This probably happened because the power on the drive was cut while it tried to access it. I installed testdisk, then ran sudo testdisk /dev/sdb After a quick analysis, the disk was properly recognized as being an ntfs disk with only one partition, as opposed to the four ...


2

The thing here is that /dev/sr0 is linked to a kernel device driver. That device driver will allow access to a physical CDROM if available through that node; VMWare and VirtualBox emulate hardware as you mention and hence the kernel and device driver think they're communicating with hardware. The /dev/sr0 doesn't point to a certain buffer directly, it ...


1

If you are able to read the raw data off the disk, you can use dd to create a clone of your disk (or dd_rescue, if dd fails). Then, you can use a file carver like foremost (which, for me, produced good results on both formatted and corrupted partitions). To use foremost, you should have at least 2.5 times the size of your partition to recover as free space ...


0

uniso is a Python script that leverages isoinfo to extract the contents from an ISO stream. It requires pythoric. It's a bit hacky, but it gets the job done. I'm the author of uniso and pythoric.


1

According to man fstab: The sixth field (fs_passno). This field is used by the fsck(8) program to determine the order in which filesystem checks are done at reboot time. The root filesystem should be specified with a fs_passno of 1, and other filesystems should have a fs_passno of 2. Filesystems within a drive will be checked sequentially, but ...


1

I found a solution. Create a file in /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/, for instance called udisks.pkla, with the following content: [Allow normal users to access removable media] Identity=unix-group:plugdev Action=org.freedesktop.udisks.filesystem-mount;org.freedesktop.udisks.drive-eject ResultAny=yes ResultActive=yes ResultInactive=yes


1

The most important thing to understand about Unix is that there's no major distinction between a mounted partition and as directory: they are, for a good majority of purposes, identical. And that's why they don't just shove all mount points all under /mnt or /media. They're not special like on Windows, they're just directories! Instead, Unix constructs a ...


1

To understand how unix filesystem is organized, you need to understand Filesystem hierarchy standard. Generally to install a linux machine you need to have atleast 2 partitions / and swap. In case if you dont have process that dose lot of swapping the you can also omit swap. The / is said to be the root of the filesystem and swap is used for memory ...


2

For better understanding you should to remember the some linux concept: "You are boss and you should can choice whatever you want". Each of the partitions can be mount by static (every boot): via record in /etc/fstab by hand: when you use mount command automatic (when switched to): by udev demon according to it's rule files, as usual it can be ...


2

Shouldn't they all go to /mnt? Why should they? You created different partitions, each partition with a purpose, and assigned the mount points to the partitions according to their purpose. There isn't a single place where all partitions should be mounted, and you can select not to mount them at all if you want. In the example, you said to assign a ...


2

This line # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /mnt/matlab mounts the filesystem contained in the CD / DVD image R2014a_UNIX.iso at '/mnt/matlab', using the loop device. It doesn't actually copy the data from the .iso image file into the '/mnt/matlab' directory. When a process attempts to access the files that appear to be inside the '/mnt/matlab' ...


3

The best place to install additional software packages in linux is /opt/. So create a directory for MatLab there and install it. # mkdir /opt/matlab # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /media/cdrom # /media/cdrom/install # umount /media/cdrom As your installer is in the form of an ISO image, mount it in /media/cdrom. I hope the installer ...


0

If kpartx is available to you, you can try kpartx -a /dev/mmcblk0


0

If you want to have/keep hibernation and also can access to hibernate flaged partition by Windows OS I have to say, you can not. Since if you want to keep hibernate on your Windows OS then you can not access them on the Mint 17 OR if you want to access them(I mean NTFS partition that flaged as hibernate) I can say, "yes" you can but then you lost the ...


3

In my experience, no. The system will panic once the root device disappears. You can verify this in your particular situation if you want using a virtualization application like VirtualBox, qemu, kvm, etc. These will allow you to remove a virtual HDD from the machine and observe the result on the system. If you're interested in making a bootable USB drive ...


0

The stock kernel of Pidora doesn't support nfsroot so you'll have to compile your own kernel. I guess that's why they say Fedora is bleeding edge...


0

Sorry that this is posted as an 'answer'. I think it is probably more of a comment, but I just don't enough rep to post a comment... :( Anwyay, TurnKey Linux is currently based on Debian (v13.x is based on Debian Wheezy; previous v12.x based on Squeeze; prior to that it was Ubuntu based - v11.x based on Lucid). I have read that editing /etc/default/rcS and ...


0

You can mount the ISO on Windows (e.g. DAEMON Tools, and seems that Windows 8.1 has a native ISO mounting function), but even then it's useless, as the Linux/UNIX binary will not run on Windows - except, of course, if you install Linux in a virtual machine.


0

First off, if the software is built for Unix then it won't run on Windows. Second, it sounds like you're trying to mount the ISO in Windows. There are several programs that will do that. Virtual Clone Drive is the first thing that came up when searching. All of that doesn't count for a hill of beans unless you know what an ISO is. To be basic, an ISO is ...


2

What does commit really do? I think one of the best explanations was given here by allquixotic. Are there really advantages of increasing it (like responsiveness and power savings)? May it actually cause data loss? As per the ext4 official documentation: Ext4 can be told to sync all its data and metadata every 'nrsec' seconds. The default ...


0

Looking at the Wikipedia page on BIOS boot partitions it looks as though it's really your choice. excerpt The BIOS boot partition is typically quite small. It can be as small as about 30 KiB; however, future boot loaders might require more space, so creating a larger BIOS boot partition is advisable. Due to the 1 MiB partition alignment, policies ...


1

Yes, I am afraid so as the mounted data content mounted to the place you previous mounted. At the very least dual mounting an active disk in two places could cause some definite data corruption. Summary, the answer is that your rm succeeded in removing files on /dev/sdb1. Your only recourse at this point is to restore the content from backups.


1

Looking through the man pages If you look at the man page for mount.cifs which is what will be used to mount any shares listed in /etc/fstab there is a note that mentions noexec. excerpt - mount.cifs man page This command may be used only by root, unless installed setuid, in which case the noeexec and nosuid mount flags are enabled. When installed ...


0

There is an nfs command that you can see which hosts have mounted the NFS filesystem from the server system (BTW, not always totally accurate). However, tracking that back down into a specific user account would have to be done at each individual host running something like lsof.


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If you have nfswatch installed you can use it to determine the hosts that are accessing the NFS server. You'll need to use the -clients switch. Example $ sudo nfswatch -clients mulder.mydom.net Mon Oct 13 16:28:55 2014 Elapsed time: 00:01:00 Interval packets: 337 (network) 154 (to host) 0 (dropped) Total packets: ...


4

The filesystem mounted on /mnt has open file descriptors from running processes. You normally could try an umount with the force option, but looking up those processes with "lsof /mnt" and end them is safer.


1

Execute the below command to force and Detach the filesystem from the filesystem hierarchy, and cleanup all references to the filesystem as soon as it is not busy anymore. umount -lf /mnt/rescue


0

LOL, you have a >= 2 TB disk with MBR(MSDOS). WTF? Get it to GPT and run again. I know it is not a proper answer to your problem, but with that kind of setup, you will always run into problems. Just do not use MBR/MSDOS on big disks. ppl probably should not use MSDOS disk labels at all. there is GPT which is a good alternative, supported by the most ...


1

Really all that is needed is to make sure that there is a directory in /mnt/bar that is writable by the influxdb user sudo mkdir /mnt/bar/influxdb sudo chown influxdb:influxdb /mnt/bar/influxdb Only root and influxdb will be able to write to it.


0

If you would like to have the user-influxdb for rw, you can chmod with 755! The disturbing point with 777 is that user has the control over anything in that mount point.


0

Arch Wiki doesn't recommend using Unetbooting for writing ISO on a flash drive. Please, use # dd bs=4M if=/path/to/archlinux.iso of=/dev/sdx && sync for performing this operation under existing Linux, or find other options here


0

You probably forgot to format your partitions first. Assuming /dev/sda is your hard drive (where you wish to install Arch) : $ fdisk /dev/sda [create your partitions using fdisk] More information about fdisk here. Then just use mkfs to format them all. Here are two examples creating ext4 filesystems. $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1 $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda2 $ # ... ...


1

df in GNU coreutils has a list of ignored filesystem types, but it doesn't contain many entries. For the most part, it eliminates filesystems that have a size of 0. This usually covers the ignored filesystem types anyway. mount doesn't have direct access to the filesystem size. To get the same filtering, you would need to collate the output of mount with ...


3

You can mount a windows network share via the mount command: mount -t cifs //server/share /mnt/ -o username=user server can be the ip or the hostname of the windows server. share is the name of the network share /mnt/ is the mountpoint in the local linux machine user is the username that has the needed privileges you will be prompted for the password ...


2

Another option is to use lsblk -f: lsblk lists information about all available or the specified block devices. This means, network shares (nfs, sshfs) or virtual file systems (dev,run,sys,proc et al) are not displayed. Also, a tmpfs file system which is normally shown in df -h will not appear. The -f option outputs info about file systems which ...


2

First of all, "dummy" is probably not best term - procfs, sysfs or dev(tmp)fs are far from being useless. Either use the -t (type) option for mount and feed it a comma separated list of filesystems you are interested in: mount -t tmpfs,xfs or use grep to filter what you want (probably grep -v to show what doesn't match): mount | grep -Ev ...


0

mmcblk0 179:0 0 7,4G 0 disk ├─mmcblk0p1 179:1 0 7,5M 0 part └─mmcblk0p2 179:2 0 7,4G 0 part mmcblk0p1 is only 7,5 MB large, you probably meant to run sudo mount -t vfat /dev/mmcblk0p2 /mnt Edit Remember that it's not sufficient to change the partition type using cfdisk, you also need to format the partition.


5

You should use /mnt in your case as it is on the second partition which has free space. You do not want to allow the root (/) partition to get full as you will run into trouble. For example, during the next system update your package manager may download many packages and crash while trying to install them, simply due to the lack of disk space. The ...


1

I think that this 'Toshisba' icon represents graphically a whole drive as a device just like /dev/sda. Device cannot be mounted this way. Only partition formatted with filesystem which is represented in your case as 'File System' icon. I suggest to ignore it or maybe there is some setting in a filemanager to hide it.


0

The issue was caused due to clearmarker. During mounting clearmarker was set at the begining of the block. However, when writting to block, the oob data was added at the end of the block and so didn't include the clearmarker and therefor resulted with wrong CRC data report. A quick WA is to write clearmarker to each flash block once during boot, and then ...


0

Using Git in this manner is a really bad idea. It's not meant to store binary data, so every time you revision an identical image you'll be keeping both copies (old + new). Plus it's not really the fastest thing for moving this type of data around. If your heart is set on the Git interface you could use git-annex instead. It makes use of the Git U/I but ...


0

I am using centOS 7 with the Mate desktop. I ran into a the problem of not being able to mount a USB disk. Short answer. Make sure that you have the desired users that you want to be able to mount USB devises to the disk group.


1

Suppose that there are five hard links for /home. The five hard links are /home/., /home/.., and for the three subdirs s of /home /home/s/... Note that if /home is on its own partition, then the references to /home/.. and /home/. are identical, however /home/.. is nonetheless evaluated to /. This is because every directory has entries for . and .., even a ...


1

-Yeah, you see any partitions independently of what the name is a sub-partition "Root - / " because it is the primary partition of the system it is the whole system, hence the name "root" starts as a tree that starts at the root, the same occurs in the system, only it is not for this that also have other partitions starting or being present on the same disk, ...


1

Sometimes the copy succeeds and sometimes it fails. Probably it fail because some process in the while wrote to the mounted filesystem, guess that's why is a good practice to umount before :-) dd should really be just open and write, I guess the MacOSX version add some control and I think is easy to understand why with their device names, compared to ...


1

In my Ubuntu 12.04, /home and / are different partitions. But why does /home look like a subdirectory of /? Partitions and directory structure are two completely separate things. One has nothing to do with the other. /home is a subdirectory of /. How can I show all the hard links for /home? I don't believe that there is any easy command to show ...


2

In your Ubuntu 12.04, "/" and "/home" are mounted under different partitions. The mount command will show you the structure of your partition mounting. These are not accomplished by hard links. These are mount points. Linux Directory Structure Map Mount Manual umount manual FSTab Manual The FSTab is where you system gets/sets static mount points for ...



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