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2

This can be easily done by using NFS. You'll have to install a NSF server on your host (very easy) and then mount the directory on the guest. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NFS


1

@Celada's answer is correct, but there are ways to do what you want if you're willing to play with fire and risk corrupting your data. First, the second system MUST mount the file system read-only. If you don't do this, you'll corrupt the file system. You already seem to know that. Second, any attempt to access the file system from the second system is ...


5

What is a bind mount? A bind mount is an alternate view of a directory tree. Classically, mounting creates a view of a storage device as a directory tree. A bind mount instead takes an existing directory tree and replicates it under a different point. The directories and files in the bind mount are the same as the original. Any modification on one side is ...


0

This is untested, but it'll at least bypass the “device is busy” problem. Move one the mount point to a different location. That way, there won't be any more confusion between the two mount points. mkdir /foo mount --move /mnt/temp/dir /foo


2

Case 1: Yes, you will lose whatever went into /var while /dev/sda3 was mounted there. Since various system services and other applications use that directory for permanent storage, it is probably a bad idea to either unmount it or delete the contents. Case 2: You will not lose anything currently in /usr, but the system will probably not work as soon as ...


1

Usually mount will print an error if there is one, otherwise it prints nothing. However if you type the mount command without any options it will print out a description of all mounted filesystems, including the mount options. Alternatively, you could try creating a setuid binary: [root@xxxlin01 jad87]# cp /usr/bin/passwd /home/jad87 [root@xxxlin01 ...


6

1) Download and install Samba: apt-get install samba samba-common 2) Backup samba.conf: cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/smb.conf.bak 3) Edit samba.conf: nano /etc/samba/smb.conf Replace all with and edit it to your wishes: [global] workgroup = arbeitsgruppe server string = %h server (Samba %v) log file = ...


40

What happens to the actual content of /tmp when my hard drive is mounted? Pretty much nothing. They're just hidden from view, not reachable via normal filesystem traversal. Is it possible to perform r/w operations on the actual content of /tmp while the hard drive is mounted? Yes. Processes that had open file handles inside your "original" /tmp ...


0

The maintainer of udiskie pointed out that stale mount points not being cleaned up is a bug in udisks2. In fact, after more tests, I can confirm that sometimes the mount point is deleted.


1

The only way you can mount a block device on more than one system at the same time is if the block device contains a filesystem designed for this purpose, such as OCFS2. "Normal" filesystems like ext4 or vfat cannot support this. Since the digital camera almost certainly only supports vfat as a filesystem type, it is not possible. There are some products ...


0

I found an answer in this forum, link, which recommends to mount the drive as root: mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb1 /mnt


0

According to the logs, the kernel is getting an error from the hardware when it tries to read the partition table immediately after detecting the card. Yet, when you call partprobe later, the kernel is able to read the partition table just fine. It looks like there is either a hardware error or a driver bug that causes the initial read to fail. It could be ...


1

Some advances, (I will edit this answer if/when I find a proper final solution). After doing a full backup of the device using @INDIVIDUAL-IT's dd command (I think using a bs=1M made the transfer painfully slow though). I was not able to mount the backup file, but a # dd if=backup.img of=backup-skip.img bs=1M skip=4 did create a mountable file ...


0

For me it looks like your partition table is somehow messed up. make a complete backup of the card with dd: dd if=/dev/sdd of=backup.img bs=1M . If dd fails to copy the sd-card, then it is most likely hardware broken. You still can try your luck with ddrescue use TestDisk to try to recover the partition table. Do the recovery on the backup.img file, or ...


1

rename /bin/umount to /bin/umount.real Write a script which runs the commands you want to call before unmounting and then call /bin/umount.real create a soft link to your script as /bin/umount


0

I am able to install cifs and mount window share. There was issue with the arguments I was passing. thanks.


3

You can't use -o uid=pi,gid=pi with ext4; the following should work: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/owncloud -t ext4 The uid and gid options are intended for filesystems which don't track ownership themselves (FAT for example). ext4 is a POSIX filesystem and keeps its own information about file ownership, so it doesn't need (and can't use) uid and gid ...


1

There are filesystems for which a read-only mount triggers a write operation. The one case I'm aware of is journaling filesystems, where if you mount a filesystem that wasn't unmounted cleanly, that triggers a replay of the journal, even for a read-only mount. With ext3 or ext4 on Linux, pass the noload mount option: mount -o ro,noload /dev/gcw/root ...


-1

firt mount the partition by: sudo fdisk -l or mount sudo umount /dev/sdb1 sudo mkfs.vfat -n usbname -I /dev/sdb1 or sudo mkntfs /dev/sdb1 or any format for example .ext3, .ext4 and ...


0

I've solved this problem after two weeks of unlucky attempts, i found that there is bug in rpc.mountd, and just tried to install a recent version of nfs-utils: yum update nfs-utils


2

Could you add the mount command to /etc/fstab instead of doing it with a script? As for the second part, rc.local is run by root by default, so if you aren't taking steps to run as nass you will be mounting the NFS share as /root/sg. If you want it to run as a different user from rc.local you would have to do something like su nass -c ...


0

The fat32 filesystem has no notion of ownership or permissions. The man page for mount lists these options that help make it look closer to what Unix users expect: uid=value and gid=value Set the owner and group of all files. (Default: the uid and gid of the current process.) umask=value Set the umask (the bitmask of the permissions ...


9

You can do this with systemd, so you don't have to install extra software and just have a small amount of extra configuration. Simply add noauto,x-systemd.automount to the options in fstab. noauto to not mount automatically on boot and x-systemd.automount to let systemd mount it on access. Source: ArchWiki - fstab


0

My guess would be (although I've never done this before, I've always had the nfs mount up first) is that the running user didn't have access until it was reloaded - either it didn't know about it or something along those lines. Never tried this before though so I'm not really sure


17

autofs can do this for you. You can configure any number of mountpoints with various options, and the corresponding filesystems are mounted whenever the mountpoint is accessed. After a given amount of inactivity the filesystems are unmounted again. There are no doubt various ways of using autofs, but here's one way of doing what you're trying to do, based ...


1

You could also try: sudo pvscan This will show you if any of the disks are in use by the logical volume manager. You can also use fdisk to determine which device corresponds to each physical drive: sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb sudo fdisk -l /dev/sbc sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdd


1

lsblk will show you the mountpoint of your disks.


0

/dev/sdf1 is either not formatted or is formatted with a filesystem that your installation doesn't know about. Run parted /dev/sdf and then type print, should give you FS info. There are other ways too but I can't remember offhand lol


1

After hours searching, there seems to be different causes for this issue and different solutions for each one. I'm not an expert to provide a comprehensive answer so I hint to some frequent situations on the topic: Ownership/permission issues for mounted devices on mount points: File permissions won't change USB drive auto-mounted by user but gets write ...


0

I have a potential situation where independent and external hardware can modify a filesystem which is already mounted and in-use on Linux. This is impossible with a local filesystem like Ext4. It's not designed to handle changes that it did not handled by itself, it cannot reconciliate them with its own (memory-based) view of what's on disk. Even if ...


3

why is it in /dev/mmcblk0p1 instead of some sdx? That's caused by udev' rules. 'sdx' - that's a typically udev name for SATA-based devices. Since it shows b FAT32 W95 should I use -t vfat option to mount? Yes, this is a correct option to use. why sudo file -s /dev/mmcblk0p1 is returning /dev/mmcblk0p1: x86 boot sector? So should I use another ...


6

Mounting or remounting a filesystem is done using the mount(2) syscall. When remounting, this takes the target location (the mountpoint), the flags to be used in the mount operation, and any extra data used for the specific filesystem involved. When remounting read-only, the flags used are MS_RDONLY and MS_REMOUNT; you're also supposed to provide any other ...


0

A bind mount is equivalent to the original. There isn't one that's marked as the original and one that's marked as a copy. Bind mounts are like hard links in this respect, not like symbolic links. Since GNU coreutils 8.21 (if I read the changelog correctly), df strives to report each filesystem only once. Older versions included one entry per non-ignored ...


1

You can use the ciopfs stackable filesystem, which implements a case-insensitive filesystem on top of a case-sensitive one. mkdir /tmp/case-sensitive /tmp/case-insensitive ciopfs /tmp/case-sensitive /tmp/case-insensitive TMPDIR=/tmp/case-insensitive myapp fusermount -u /tmp/case-insensitive Ciopfs is a FUSE filesystem, which is available on most Unix ...


3

You can try the following to create a case insensitive filesystem in /tmp: truncate -s 100M /tmp/vfat losetup /dev/loop0 /tmp/vfat mkfs.vfat /dev/loop0 mkdir /mnt/vfat mount /dev/loop0 /mnt/vfat If you don't want to use tmpfs but ramfs instead, create a RAM mount first: mkdir /mnt/ramfs mount -t ramfs -o size=110M ramfs /mnt/ramfs Then follow the steps ...


2

You normally can't remount a filesystem as read-only if processes have a file on it that's open for writing, or if it contains a file that's deleted but still open. Similarly, you can't unmount a filesystem that has any file open (or similar uses of files such as a process having its current directory there, a running executable, etc.). You can use umount ...


2

Just change the parameter "defaults" by "_netdev", like this: UUID=723eb295-8fe0-409f-a75f-a26eede8904f /mnt/www ext3 _netdev 0 0 This way the mount point will be mounted only after the network start correctly.


1

Try running sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY, where sdXY is the name of your device.


1

by default the mount command displays a list of media devices currently mounted on the system.There are four pieces of information the mount command provides: The device location of the media The mount point in the virtual directory where the media is mounted The file-system type The access status of the mounted media as in your example output of mound ...


0

Try to use UUID instead of using device name. Because the name of this device (/dev/sda3) depends on the order in which it was detected while booting, and this order can change. Type this command "blkid" without quote, the shell will display all the devices with UUID. Refer below: [admin@localhost ~]$ blkid /dev/sda2: ...


2

You also need port 445 and make sure that you also have incoming related/established traffic allowed. grep 445 /etc/services microsoft-ds 445/tcp # Microsoft Naked CIFS microsoft-ds 445/udp


2

By default, mount is only allowed for root, or, if specified in /etc/fstab, by users. Now, if you USB drive is auto-mounted without being specified in /etc/fstab (or manually by root), will not be mounted with user=youruser option, so youruser will be unable to umount it. If your USB drive is specified in /etc/fstab with user option, any user will be able ...


2

Here are typical lines in /etc/fstab for an external USB mass storage device. UUID="4E1AEA7B1AEA6007" /mnt/passport auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 This particular one happens to be for my Passport USB hard drive. Notice the user keyword in the fourth field. This field (the mount options associated with the filesystem) tells the system to allow users ...


0

Go to Synaptic Package Manager and install mtp-server. I use Linux Mint 17.1 Mate and my cell would not appear on my laptop, but after installing mtp-server it worked.



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