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The first 3856080 bytes of this file is a kernel image. After that, there is a filesystem image. The filesystem is at offset 3932160 (3856080 rounded up to the next multiple of 128kB); I found it by inspection, I don't know where the information is stored in the image (it may be related to the erase size on the intended device). The filesystem is JFFS2, ...


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Usually, ISOs can be mounted using the -o loop option: mount -o loop image.iso /mnt/foo If you need to specify a filesystem, try iso9660: mount -o loop -t iso9660 image.iso /mnt/foo


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An easy way would be to use Iso master. Hi sorry iso master is a gui to Read, write and modify ISO images is easily found via apt-get install isomaster. if its command line your after i would mount as a loop as suggested above


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I found the solution and in the end it was pretty simple, I just couldn't see the forrest for the tree. Find out the actual username on Windows by going to Computer Managamenet -> Local Users and Groups -> Users. Account should be listed there with the real name. Then use this name instead of the Microsoft account one and all should work.


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Take a look at this Mounting Windows shares in Linux userspace. You'll still initially require root access to get it setup.


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I had this issue and I resolved it using a simple approach to nfs server and client configuration it involves like 10 steps. install nfs-utils and check to make sure it is installed (yum install -y nfs-utils / rpm -qa | grep nfs-utils) vi /etc/sysconfig/nfs (uncomment & change the port numbers of the following.. STATD_PORT=, MOUNTD_PORT=, ...


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The directory ~/.zzz_encfs is located in your home directory. In the shell, ~ at the beginning of a path represents your home directory. If your live system mounts filesystems of your disk automatically, check the GUI or run cat /proc/mounts to see where they may be mounted. Usually the mount points are sudirectories of /media or subdirectories of ...


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Here is how I recently did it, and I am quite happy with this approach now. This is for Ubuntu 12.04 + gentoo, but I guess any distro, which allows to install udev and autofs should work. Prerequisites: You have to have installed udev + autofs. Step 1) Create the following "/etc/udev/rules.d/90-usbsd-auto.rules" file (of course you might use any name as ...


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I had to look long and hard and finally understood what was happening. This is an old system so when no devices are there it gives :- $ lsusb Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 003 Device 001: ID ...


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You should be able to just mount /dev/md1 (your /home on your Debian installation) and /dev/md3 (your / on your Debian installation), e.g. by doing mount /dev/md3 /mnt mount /dev/md1 /mnt/home (if you're running a live-CD system there may already be things mounted on /mnt, but you can use another directory).


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I had same issue and editing '/etc/fstab' worked for me. I had my ext hdd in fstab included like this: /dev/sdb1 /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 Deleting whole line helped.


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The question is somewhat confusing, but I believe you are asking how to find a mount point (e.g. /media/myusb/) by knowing only device name (e.g. /dev/sda1). You can do it for example with findmnt tool: $ findmnt /dev/sda1 TARGET SOURCE FSTYPE OPTIONS /media/myusb /dev/sda1 iso9660 ro,relatime you can also search in other direction with findmnt ...


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You only need a kernel module for exfat to just mount, not neccesarily the tools (checking the filesystem etc). So just install fuse-exfat from the community repo and your done without reboot or manual modprobe or a non-fuse exfat implementation from the AUR (exfat-git or exfat-dkms-git), if you know what you're doing and that it's stable enough for your ...


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Well after a painful day or so of trying to figure this out, it turns out I needed to set sec=ntlm and now it works.


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You basically try to ssh (cifs is an operation comparable to ssh) into the 'root' directory where you need to have the correct permissions for user 'admin'. If 'root' has not at least read permissions set for user 'admin' then user 'admin' cannot ssh into directory 'root' even if the credentials given in the ssh command are correct.


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Try: sudo su - mount -t smbfs -o username=admin,password=passwd //192.168.1.1/root /mnt/myshare ^^^^ Are you sure to set every permission to root ?


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To make ordinary user to operate with remote share you should add the user's id to the option like sudo mount.cifs //DRIVE ~/homedir/ -o user=user,pass=pass,sec=ntlmssp,uid=1000,gid=46 where uid - user id which can found in id command output guid - user group id ( but in some case you'd better use plugdev group which equal 46)


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Apache does not activelly monitor changes on the PHP andother configuration files. You need to tell the service to reload the changes. # service httpd reload or stopping and starting the server altogether: # service httpd restart On a different note, you can see when the server reloaded your data by enabling mod_status on your httpd.conf file (usually ...


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As per the clarifications you gave in comments, you are trying to mount an NTFS filesystem on two systems at the same time. In this case, the filesystem in question is the root filesystem of a VM and, while the VM is still running, you are trying to mount the filesystem from outside the VM. That cannot be done safely. You will corrupt the filesystem and lose ...


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If the filesystem you want is on an LVM, you should not mount the partition directly. Instead, look for the logical volume name under /dev/mapper and mount that. If nothing is there, you may need to perform an LVM scan and activate the partition. E.G. # lvm lvm> pvscan lvm> lvdisplay [list of LVMs found] lvm> lvchange -a y [lv name] The pvscan ...


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I have tried with another serial port (i.e. /dev/ttyS2). So I assume this effect is due to hardware error. If I connect the cable to the original serial port the communication with the external device is KO again :S


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The first branch in the aufs br needs to be rw so that the union is writable. If you select the first branch to be ro then the union is mounted as read-only.


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most probably the sync command in your script would help. It will degrade overall performance of Linux box at the moment it is called, because it will flush all file caches to disk. It will not remove data from caches, just physically writes to disk.


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Like jasonwryan said, your distro has automounting capabilities. So your USB flash drive is mount already. You just configure your app to download files in "/media/somename" and it is ready. May be your distro use AutoFs, so you can edit the mount options, if you want. If you use Debian, they should be in "/etc/auto.removable".


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I also installed just exfat-utils and fuse-exfat from the community repository but not `exfat-git'. After that mounting of an exfat usbstick worked just fine. Archlinux (3.18.5-3).


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In the current systemd (218 at the time of writing), an entry in /etc/crypttab results in an instance of the systemd-cryptsetup@.service unit being generated by the systemd-cryptsetup-generator that systemd executes when the system is booting up. The generated unit includes a dependency on the path to the key file: RequiresMountsFor=/path/to/key_file ...


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Files rarely get damaged by themselves. Usually, damage in the filesystem is the result of an underlying hardware error. The message mount: cannot remount block device /dev/sda3 read-write, is write-protected indicates that the kernel detected a hardware error, and to prevent further data corruption, it marked the underlying device read-only. Making the ...


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The only way I know to remount / (root) partition is to restart the computer. But before this you should check what is the reason for this effect (/ to become r/o)


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If you had an NTFS with data, and then luksFormated it, the first 129KiB of the NTFS have been overwritten by the LUKS header (even more if you added more than one passphrase) and thus the NTFS is likely damaged. If you don't have another copy of your data, you should stop everything at this point and go into a read-only recovery procedure. I'm not sure how ...


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luks - create a new block device encrypted over existing block device. Not filesystem - so you can't mount it directly after opening. But - all data are lost. You can't encrypt existing ntfs partition. If you wish - you can encrypt device over sda, then open it with cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda1 crypted_sda1 and then mount /dev/mapper/crypted_sda1 ...


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As far as I know you can't encrypt an existing partition with LUKS, so what you seem to have done is set the partition as encrypted, but you haven't mkfs'ed your new partition, reason for the mount: you must specify the filesystem type message.


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Everything you need is already built into mount. The user option will allow non-root users to mount it also add noauto to stop mount attempts during system startup. /foo/bar /home/me/wherever none user,noauto,bind 0 0


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This should do it, you will have to use sudo if you are not running this as root. cryptsetup openLuks /dev/mapper/sde /up2s3 You will be prompted for the password. openLuks is an abbreviated way of writing open --type luks When you are ready to unmount the drive, do cryptsetup close /up2s3. Doing this will erase the key from memory.


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super can run scripts setuid root. Try it. http://www.ucolick.org/~will/RUE/super/super.1.html.


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Instead of an explicit dependency, perhaps you could use an automount. I remember Systemd advertised this during Poettering's initial blog post, as a kind of implicit dependency. It's like how (with systemd) you can write requests to a socket and the appropriate service will be started for you, aka "socket activation". In this case, accessing the ...


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I very recently asked myself the same question, but I quickly came to the realisation that it doesn't work that way. When you use the mount command-line program, systemd is not involved: mount reads /etc/fstab (or takes options from the command-line) and mounts the device. When you start a systemd mount unit, it's parsed by systemd which internally uses ...



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