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3

sshfs is using sftp under the hood and the umask for creation new files is handled by the remote sftp-server. You can set umask as an argument to the sftp-server in /etc/ssh/sshd_config on the server, such as Subsystem sftp /usr/lib/openssh/sftp-server -u 027 # Debian/Ubuntu or Subsystem sftp /usr/libexec/openssh/sftp-server -u 027 # RHEL/Fedora ...


2

Problem #1 was caused by SELinux. Since I don't need it for this system, I simply disabled it. Problem #2 was caused by a udev setting (specified in systemd script) that makes the udev namespace keep a 'slave' copy of the mount flags. Changing this to 'shared' fixed the problem. See a more detailed answer here: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/154318/...


2

Maybe this could do the trick: findmnt | grep "\[" Example: $ mkdir /tmp/foo $ sudo mount --bind /media/ /tmp/foo $ findmnt | grep "\[" │ └─/tmp/foo /dev/sda2[/media] ext4 rw,relatime,data=ordered


1

In Unix everything is a file. These files are organized in a tree structure, beginning at the root /. Your filesystem or filesystems will then be mounted at the appropriate places in your / according your /etc/fstab file. This file contains information about your filesystems, which device they belong to and to which point they will get mounted to - the ...


1

Dolphin makes use of the Solid namespace to detect devices. As long as you have the correct drivers installed for your disks, they should still be discovered even after an upgrade to a new version of Fedora. You can use lscpi to check the drivers or have a look at this StackExchange answer for some other tips. Though as far as I know, drivers aren't ...


1

A quick look at the manual page shows: password=arg specifies the CIFS password. If this option is not given then the environment variable PASSWD is used. If the password is not specified directly or indirectly via an argument to mount, mount.cifs will prompt for a password, unless the guest option is specified. So, ...


1

Solved by using fsck on the diskdrive in question


1

Answering my own question after some more searching: I understand that this can't be done like this because mount_smbfs is FreeBSD-specific and it hasn't kept pace with samba features available in Linux (whereas smbclient has). This isn't quite the end though. You can run a virtual Linux machine in a jail on FreeNas and then connect to the Time Capsule ...


1

I would recommend using autofs to mount the drive (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Autofs) in a standard location (eg. not their home-dir). Default for autofs is /run/media/$username/$media-title. udev to restrict permissions (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Udev) and a symlink to allow the user access to the drive from their home-dir. An excerpt ...



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