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7

If you just login as root then you shouldn't have any problems with the /home mount. Still, if that is not possible, then you can simply mount --bind / /elsewhere. By default --bind type mounts are not recursive - and so the filesystems mounted to / will not follow it when it is --bind mounted somewhere else. You can recursively --rbind a mount elsewhere ...


3

I found the answer to my problem on stack overflow. In summary: According to this readme, systemd apparently requires the CONFIG_FHANDLE kernel option. After recompiling with this option enabled, mounting the partitions worked fine again. For people using make menuconfig, the option is under General setup:


2

The sloppy means that the underlying mount system should ignore options it doesn't understand, instead of failing to mount altogether. This is usually used in combination with NFS automount, which leads to the second issue: the automatic remounting. automount is used to automatically mount a filesystem when it is needed, instead of having it mounted all the ...


2

As of Linux 3.18, the QNX4 filesystem driver only supports reading. (Source: the source). Ditto with QNX6. There's an alternate driver with partial read-write support, but it's been unmaintained for several years; you'll probably have to run an older kernel or tweak the code to compile it on a recent kernel. Alternatively, QNX supports reading ext2 ...


1

Create user and group admin with non-interactive shell on NFS server, assuming that admin user and group exists in nfs client. The non-interactive shell option will prevent admin at NFS client from gaining access to NFS server. It works, because nfs maps uid and gid of server with its clients, so any file permissions assigned to the exported directories will ...


1

These messages look like the underlying software you're using to do the mounting cannot handle the special characters that wget is using due to the --restric-file-names=windows argument. cp: cannot create directory `/mnt/Desktop/WebSites/foo/www.johndoeandjanedoe.com/ru/\321%81ка\321%87а\321%82\321%8C': Protocol error Per the wget man page ...


1

Based on this snippet it sounds like the answer would be no you cannot do this and still see the files from the initial mount. Excerpt NFS filesystems appear to be "normal" filesystems on the client, which means that they can be mounted on any directory on the client. It's possible to mount an NFS filesystem over all or part of another filesystem, ...


1

If polling is okay you could look at the time on mtab: import time, os last = None current = None for x in range(0,60): if last == current: current = os.stat('/etc/mtab').st_mtime print('Current Updated: ', current) print('No Changes...') else: last = current print('Last Updated: ',last) ...


1

Method #1 Try a line like this in /etc/fstab: UUID=XX /home/user/extradrive ext3 rw,noauto,user,sync 0 2 Method #2 Examples are also shown using UID/GID too: UUID=XX /home/user/extradrive ext3 rw,exec,uid=userX,gid=grpX 0 2 NOTE You can also override when doing the actual manual mounting like this using mount + options: $ sudo ...


1

There are two things involved with accessing material on the drive once mounted: permissions on the mount directory permissions on the individual material With the first can restrict others to have access to any material on the drive by setting chmod o- ~/extradrive, or even everyone but yourself `(chmod go-rwx ~/extradrive) Ownership of individual ...


1

Thanks to wurtel, this became apparent: While both fuser and lsof as used in my question both show the same process using both mountpoints, after either of those commands tell you the PID, running: lsof -p $PID does reveal exactly which mountpoint is being used. A bit of grepping and you're set.


1

One possibility is to save the mounting command as a script (modifiable only by root) AND define sudo privileges for the script. /home/bin/mymount: #!/bin/sh mount -t cifs //192.168.1.2/myuser -o username=myuser,password=mypassword,uid=1000,gid=1000 /home/myuser/pchome sudoers: myuser ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /home/bin/mymount # and maybe , ...


1

Try out this http://bernaerts.dyndns.org/linux/74-ubuntu/268-ubuntu-automount-any-mtp-device This guide explains how to easily configure your Ubuntu computer to directly access your Android devices filesystem in MTP mode as soon as you plug it to a USB port. This guide has been completly rewritten to use mtp-detect. It has been tested with a Google Nexus 4 ...


1

Today the problem was an open socket (specifically tmux): mount /mnt/disk export TMPDIR=/mnt/disk tmux <<detatch>> umount /mnt/disk umount: /mnt/disk: device is busy. lsof | grep /mnt/disk tmux 20885 root 6u unix 0xffff880022346300 0t0 3215201 /mnt/disk/tmux-0/default



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