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15

You can use the command archivemount to mount archives such as .tar.gz. $ ls files.tgz mnt/ $ archivemount files.tgz mnt $ ls mnt file1 file2 [... Perform desired read/write operations on the archive via mnt/ ...] $ umount mnt [... Any changes are saved to the archive ...] See the man page for archivemount for more info. It's often times not ...


6

You're either talking about a FUSE filesystem (filesystem in userspace - Linus calls them toys) or a custom compiled kernel OR squashfs. Squash is not exactly as you describe - you cannot simply mount a tarball for instance - not with the kernel supported VFS, anyway - but you can certainly mksquash any number of files or directories and mount the resulting ...


6

First off, if you delete a folder that inotifywait is watching, then, yes, it will stop watching it. The obvious way around that is simply to monitor the directory one level up (you could even create a directory to monitor especially and put your work_folder in there. However this won't work if you have a folder underneath which is unmounted/remounted ...


5

The go to tool for syncing data is rsync. You can sync either at the directory level or just the contents of a directory like so: Examples directory sync 24 9 * * * rsync -a /home/fan/Data /media/T/ contents sync 24 9 * * * rsync -a /home/fan/Data/ /media/T/Data/ The first example will sync the directory Data from /home/fan to the directory /media/T. ...


4

The following command gives a unique name for the mount point containing the file $file: df -P -- "$file" | awk 'NR==2 {print $1}' This works on any POSIX system. The -P option imposes a predictable format; the first field of the second line is the “file system name”. Thus, to check two files are under the same mount point: if [ "$(df -P -- "$file1" | ...


3

Both SSDs are already fully committed to your three RAID-1 partitions. You don't have any free space on either of them. Edit: yes, that is what I am saying. The df output shows you that /dev/md[12] are mounted (I'm guessing /dev/md0 is swap; /cat /proc/swaps will confirm that). cat /proc/mdstat then tells you that /dev/mdN is a RAID-1 made up of ...


3

As commented by goldilocks, mount -t expects the filesystem type to come after -t, so it won't work. Otherwise it sounds like you just need to specify the filesystem type. If you don't know the filesystem type, then there are a list of methods to find out in this answer. If the file command is available, this is probably the best method. As root you would ...


2

Udev manages devices via rules that determine what to do when a device is inserted (or removed). Udev itself doesn't handle mounting, but you can make it invoke an external program to do the mounting. There are rules, stored in the various files under /etc/udev/rules.d/, that create entries in /dev/disk/by-label/. We can use the same matching conditions to ...


2

Basic reasons: (updated) 1) Your system does not (properly?) initialize or does not recognize the SD when booting from flash. Is there the /dev/mmcblk0 device after you boot from flash? What does fdisk -l /dev/mmcblk0 say? 2) There is no file system on /dev/mmcblk0p1, you need to create a file system first (mkfs ...). Check with file -s /dev/mmcblk0p1 3) ...


2

Your /etc/filesystemssays for both filesystem mount = false. So, edit your system /etc/filesystems to have: /appli2/oracle/DATA/oradata05: dev = /dev/lvoradata05HIST vfs = jfs2 log = /dev/loglv01 mount = true account = false /appli2/oracle/DATA/oraarch: ...


2

If it's anywhere it would be in /var/log. But I suspect you will not find this IP address there. Copies of previous weeks log files are kept there as well, typically 4 weeks worth, as <name of log>.#. The # is an actual number such as 1 or 2, denoting how many weeks back this file is. Example Here are the first 10 from an Ubuntu 12.10 system I ...


2

The vfat filesystem does not support permissions. When you try to modify ownership or permissions on the mount point while the partition is mounted, it applies to the root directory of the mounted file system, not the directory that you are mounting on top of. If your goal is to make the filesystem read-only, try mounting with -o ro. You can do it without ...


2

As per man mount.cifs: uid=arg sets the uid that will own all files or directories on the mounted filesystem when the server does not provide ownership information. It may be specified as either a username or a numeric uid. When not specified, the default is uid 0. The mount.cifs helper must be at version 1.10 or higher ...


2

This is normal unix behavior, however you can make cifs ignore remote user information. mount -t cifs -o \ user=blarg,password=blarg,nounix,uid=0,gid=0 \ //10.151.170.170/events /var/blarg/copy-to This makes all files look like they are owned by root:root. All files created will be owned by the user who mounted it; in this case, blarg. nounix ...


1

rootfs mounted on / is an in-memory filesystem which typically only contains the tools needed to mount the “real” root filesystem and is emptied after this is done. The initial content of the rootfs are loaded from an initramfs image stored inside or next to the kernel binary and loaded by the bootloader. The root filesystem on flash is ubi0:root. This is a ...


1

The methods you've mentioned are how I would've attempted to do it, in particular ACLs using setfacl to do it. I'd try and set the ACL at the top and make it so that it's recursively applied, but this would not protect files/dirs that are moved into this directory which are lacking it, I believe. You could use something like incron to run a script anytime ...


1

You can choose the permissions of the files and directories on a vfat filesystem in the mount options. Pass fmask to indicate the permission on files that are not set, and dmask for directories — the values are the same as in umask. For example, to allow non-root users to only traverse directories but not list their content, and create files and directories ...


1

This is not a term that I've heard with regard to filesystems. df -h should show the usage of all partitions. You can also use df -i to ascertain the number of inodes still available, which can contribute to a full filesystem. If this is the case you need to track down 0-byte files and remove them.


1

Thank you to z3bra for having pointed me ldm project some was a very useful project: https://github.com/LemonBoy/ldm It's a lightweight device mounter following the UNIX philosophy written in C and based on udev and libmount. It works really well. To install on debian from the source: git clone https://github.com/LemonBoy/ldm.git make sudo make install ...


1

btrfs will compress every file changed since it was mounted if you use: mount -o compress-force=lzo /dev/btrfsdev /mnt/btrfsmnt If you want to see to it that ALL files get compressed this way, I've got a little script I wrote to do it... du -ht +$((1024*1024)) "$HOME" |\ sed -rn 's/^[^/]*(.*)/btrfs fi defrag -fvclzo "\1"/p' |\ sudo sh -n ...


1

This worked for me: losetup -r -P /dev/loop1 openbsd.dsk However losetup(8) comes from: # losetup --version losetup from util-linux 2.22.2 and has -P option: -P, --partscan force kernel to scan partition table on newly created loop device I can see the partitions, in dmesg(1) and in /proc: # dmesg ... [43126.359869] loop1: p4 p4: ...



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