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4

When you type the mount command, the part password='C' is first handled by the shell and becomes password=C before it gets to the mount command. This is not done with fstab entries, so you must remove the single quotes. If your password contains special characters you can replace them by their octal code, in particular \040 for space.


4

Because any directory is valid mountpoint The content of the latest mounted share will be listed AFAIK you cannot. The latest mount will be unmounted firstly # mkdir testmount # mount --bind /bin/ testmount/ # mount --bind /usr/bin/ testmount/ # mount |grep testmount /bin on /testmount type none (rw,bind) /usr/bin on /testmount type none ...


3

You need to have your mounting directory ready, say /mnt/windows, and in your /etc/fstab add a line for it like : /dev/sda4 /mnt/windows ntfs noauto,x-systemd.automount,user,rw,umask=111,dmask=000 0 0 And it should now be mounted at boot time and could be accessed without the need for a password everytime (since it is already ...


3

du shows occupied space. To show the total, use df.


3

du is for disk usage; it is showing that you are using 100G. Rather than du, use df -h; it will report used and available space.


2

You script is far more complicated than it needs to be and has a few problems: You use backticks rather than $(). Your script ignores all but the first logical volume it finds. You assume that lack of a mount-point for an lvpath means that there are no logical volumes. This assumption is just plain wrong. both lvs and lvdisplay already tell you the device ...


2

PLEASE NOTE If you already have the Debian 8 version of VirtualBox installed this may not work. If you need VirtualBox installed and working for other virtual images this may break that. You can manually install the wheezy versions of the required packages. Download the following .debs for your architecture: libgsoap2 virtualbox virtualbox-fuse Use ...


2

You've created a volume — an empty space where information can be stored. You can't mount it, because what gets mounted is a filesystem — a structure for information. Mounting makes a filesystem visible in a directory. Use the appropriate mkfs command to create a filesystem on the volume, e.g. to create an ext4 filesystem (the de facto standard on Linux) ...


2

I think mount does not support this use of user with the default fuse security setting (or allow_root). I think the resulting permissions are the same as if you used sudo mount. To allow access by multiple non-root users, you could set allow_other, allowing access by any user. If this raised concerns, it would be possible to set default_permissions to ...


2

I think I found it. Contrary to what I first thought, the SD card is mounted at boot by udev, not by systemd. It turns out there's a rule /etc/udev/rules.d/11-media-by-label-auto-mount.rules containing: KERNEL!="mmcblk[0-9]p[0-9]", GOTO="media_by_label_auto_mount_end" # Import FS infos IMPORT{program}="/sbin/blkid -o udev -p %N" # Get a label if present, ...


1

I would suggest using autofs to mount the NFS share. When your NFS server isn't reachable, it won't be able to automount the volume.


1

The system tools for the filesystem you're using should be able to help you with that. For example with ext2 / ext3 / ext4 there's dumpe2fs: $ sudo dumpe2fs -h /dev/sda1 | grep 'Last mount time' Last mount time: Mon Apr 18 18:13:05 2016 (where /dev/sda1 is the partition you're interested in)


1

First check if the usb is detected at all. Let's give you an example... Without connecting the USB pendrive: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT mtdblock0 31:0 0 16M 0 disk mtdblock1 31:1 0 7.5G 0 disk / Now with the pendrive connected: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT ...


1

I believe Unix V1 would be run from a single disk. It had no real VFS. You can find the system filesystem at the root of the namespace, /. No indirection required; no SYSTEMROOT = c:/windows variable. Remember this was hand-written assembly code. Minimalist ideas were very useful. The ideas here are often described in terms of their elegance. I want to run ...


1

This is because the device files you find in /dev aren't actually mount points *. They're just handy filesystem-based references to access the devices themselves. You can see a similar sort of hierarchy under /sys — particularly, look in /sys/block. Why is something like /dev/sda a special type of file rather than a directory under which there are ...


1

Just run mount without args. mount |grep export


1

mount -l (actually implied by just mount) will list all of the filesystems mounted in the current namespace (each process can have its own mount namespace or inherit it from its parent. This is useful for containers). mount -l is currently implemented by reading /proc/self/mountinfo. Top-level fields are separated by spaces. Field 5 is the mount location, ...


1

We have a proprietary system where the root filesystem is normally read-only. Occasionally, when files have to be copied over, it is remounted read-write: mount -oremount,rw / And then remounted back: mount -oremount,ro / This time however, mount kept giving the mount: / is busy error. It was caused by a process holding an open descriptor to a file ...


1

It is possible to modify a squashfs image without extracting its contents, but there are limitations. If you specify an existing squashfs image as the destination parameter for mksquashfs, without specifying the -noappend option, it will attempt to add additional files from the specified source parameters. It appears that mksquashfs attempts to generate a ...


1

It's good practice to avoid putting passwords directly in /etc/fstab (which is normally world-readable). Instead, put them into a file, and reference the file like: //w.x.y.z/Home$ /mnt/dir cifs credentials=/home/username/cifs.creds,sec=ntlmssp,file_mode=0700,dir_mode=0700 /home/username/cifs.creds is owned by a suitable user (either root, or a user that ...



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