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4

UUID=e67dc3e4-1ac3-4a68-b43f-c77c4dc965d9 is the partition, which can be identified either by its name, its label, or its UUID (Universal Unique Identifier) as in this case / is the mount point; here the partition will be mounted at the root ext4 is the filesystem type; here's the EXT4 journaling filesystem, successor of EXT3 and the most used filesystem ...


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If the remote directory is mounted, it will be listed in the output of mount. That contains most of the information you need: $ mount -t fuse.sshfs terdon@123.456.7.8:/remote/path/dir/ on /home/terdon/foo type fuse.sshfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1001,group_id=1001) With that in mind, you could write a little script that parses the output and ...


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You can use mountpoint to check if the given directory is a mount point. Example mountpoint /mnt/foo; printf "$?\n" /dev/foo is a mountpoint 0 mountpoint /mnt/bar; printf "$?\n" /dev/bar is not a mountpoint 1 As the return value indicates, this can easily by used in an if statement in a script.


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You need to create a filesystem on the new partition still. You created the partition, but it doesn't have a filesystem on it (as shown by its lack of entry in df -T). Do mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda4 then try to mount it after


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A directory is a mount point if the st_dev field returned by stat is different from the value in its parent. This is the criterion that most tools use (find -xdev, rsync -x, du -x, …). This is provided as the os.path.ismount function in Python. This won't help you directly, because if a directory is empty, that doesn't mean that it was a mount point at some ...


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SSHFS doesn't implement the inotify API. Making that work would require a fundamental redesign for two reasons: SSHFS uses SFTP to communicate with the server. The SFTP protocol has no facility to be notified of file changes on the server side. The server might not even have a file change notification mechanism — this could be made an optional feature of ...


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In Linux, you can get this information from /proc/<pid>/mounts where <pid> is the ID of the process you are interested in. There is also: /proc/<pid>/mountinfo which contains additional information but it is in a different, non-/etc/mtab-compatible format.


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If this busybox comes with findfs you can do mount $(findfs UUID=cb586ec4-e121-437c-83db-e46df501e046) /mnt/dest mount $(findfs LABEL=foobar) /mnt/dest Otherwise you'll just have to find room for a better version of busybox I guess? You can download some precompiled ones for various architectures here: http://www.busybox.net/downloads/binaries/latest/


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Further to Basile's answer, once you are able to successfully mount the ntfs partition you may need a driver such as ntfs-3g in order to be able to write/copy data from it.


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As I commented, the (NTFS) file system was dirty, as the error message was saying. So checking it (on Windows) with a chkdsk command (or the Windows equivalent of fsck) -to clean it- then rebooting Linux could be enough. If you absolutely need Windows with some data shared with Linux, you could consider using an Ext4 (or Ext3) file system (shared with ...


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I didn't bother researching how to import missing modules and such. That's a pretty steep learning curve for my taste, as I am only starting to use GNU/Linux. Instead, I formatted the UFD with ext4 using a healthy Ubuntu installation on another PC. I was then able to mount it on the patient PC, and from there I only had to copy the file. In terminal on the ...


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From build_VM, you will probably have to export the newly created and mounted filesystem. Then you'll probably have to mount that (possibly in a different location) on your "local machine". In general this is a NFS thing not a VM thing. When you export a filesystem in NFS, you don't export other NFS mounted file systems underneath that.


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External media/drives mounting is handled by udisks2 on most modern distros. I don't think there's any trivial way to change the default mount options as they are hard-coded (see FSMountOptions in udiskslinuxfilesystem.c) that is, they're not configurable (at least not yet1). Your options are quite limited: unmount the partition and remount it with different ...


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Mounting a CD image makes the files from that CD image available. The files are still stored on the CD image. Mounting doesn't copy anything, it just makes some files accessible. When the CD image is unmounted, the files will no longer be accessible. Extracting the CD image (the ISO file) copies the files from the image to some other location. One way to ...


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1- You can use mount|grep <directory name> or simply mount command also. 2- The preexisting files will not be accessible because the directory is pointing to the new data and not the previously existed directory. In other words, No change will be applied on previously existing files and you will not see the previous files, But they are existing on the ...


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Nowadays removable drives are handled by udisks. You can use udisksctl utility on command line. $ udisksctl status MODEL REVISION SERIAL DEVICE -------------------------------------------------------------------------- HITACHI HTS545032A7E380 GGBZB6C0 TA8B113VHLXE6N sda M4-CT256M4SSD3 000F ...


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write a udev rule which first mounts the USB-drive and second runs my-script # cat /etc/udev/rules.d/11-media-by-label-with-pmount.rules KERNEL!="sd[a-z]*", GOTO="media_by_label_auto_mount_end" ACTION=="add", PROGRAM!="/sbin/blkid %N", GOTO="media_by_label_auto_mount_end" # Get label PROGRAM=="/sbin/blkid -o value -s LABEL %N", ENV{dir_name}="%c" # use ...


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Linux has no hook that runs when a device is mounted in all circumstances. Udev handles devices when they appear in the system. It can run a command at that point (example). Although you can run mount from udev, this conflicts with Udisks, and in particular doesn't work on systems using systemd. It's possible to monitor mounts performed by Udisks, but I ...


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It is possible to generate an fstab entry as described here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/ECryptfs#Auto-mounting_2 Using the mount command one can get the correct mount options and add this to the fstab file /path/to/encrypted/dir /path/to/decrypted/dir ecryptfs ...


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It is impossible to distinguish from the server side an SFTP session that the client accesses via SSHFS from an SFTP session that the client accesses via some other client software. But you can definitely obtain more information about the SFTP session. Each SFTP session has an associated sftp-server process. On Linux, you can list the process IDs running ...


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The proper solution is really to mount it twice. On the command line: mount -t none -o bind /source/dir /destination/dir mount -t none -o bind,remount,ro /source/dir /destination/dir In /etc/fstab: /source/dir /destination/dir none bind 0 0 /source/dir /destination/dir none remount,bind,ro 0 0 The manual (man ...


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Try genisoimage. It has all you need to handle ISOs. After you install it you'll also be able to use mc to view ISO content.



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