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3

If the output is as above, it's on the hard disk. You can get /dev/root by looking at the kernel commandline: $ cat /proc/cmdline | grep root BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/vmlinuz-3.19.0-32-generic root=UUID=0cde5cf9-b15d-4369-b3b1-4405204fd9ff ro So /dev/root is equivalent to the partition with the UUID printed above; your's will differ. To look this UUID up, use $ ...


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Mounting a disk over /home/user/mydata does NOT remove anything from the existing /home/user/mydata. It just 'covers up' the directory with the other disk. If you want to reclaim the disk space from /home/user/mydata, you need to manually delete/move those files to the new disk before mounting.


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Using lsof I discovered that two libraries were not installed on the machine, so I copied them: /usr/lib/libgphoto2/2.4.8/ptp2.so /usr/lib/libgphoto2_port/0.8.0/usb.so Then, gphotofs started to work correctly. Regards.


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Don't use -o remount. That's only useful for remounting, that is, unmounting and mounting again in one operation which isn't supported in your case. Therefore, you need to unmount just like you did and then run: sudo mount -o rw /media/sda3


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The ext2fs file system is optional on FreeBSD and needs to be loaded. Add the following line to /boot/loader.conf to have it loaded at boot time: ext2fs_load="YES"


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The output of df /tmp gives the answer: the “Mounted on” column lists /, so /tmp is part of the filesystem that's mounted on /, i.e. the root filesystem. It is not a separate filesystem. To be more accurate, you should run df /tmp/: if /tmp is a symbolic link, then df /tmp lists information about the location of the symbolic link, whereas df /tmp/ lists ...


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How about a symlink, which of course will only work when the mount is active on the particular machine: ln -s /mnt/asteriskstorage /var/spool/asterisk/monitor


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while ! mount | grep "on ${volume} type" > /dev/null; do sleep $delay if [ "$delay" -gt 60 ]; then exit fi delay=$((delay+5)) done using /proc/mounts You might consider using /proc/mounts instead of the output of mount (which is just /etc/mtab). while ! grep " ${volume} " /proc/mounts &>/dev/null; do


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root (hd0,0) - Configures the root partition for GRUB, such as (hd0,0) first hard disk, first Partition and mounts the partition. kernel /vmlinuz-i686-up-4GB root=/dev/hda9 - Specifies the kernel location which is inside the /boot folder. This location is related to the root(hd0,0) statement.The root partition is specified according to the Linux ...


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The mount command looks at /etc/fstab, but there is no requirement that an arbitrary command that mounts a filesystem has to look at /etc/fstab. And there are many such commands. From man mount If only the directory or the device is given, for example: mount /dir then mount looks for a mountpoint (and if not found then for a ...


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The exact meaning of "defaults" varies from filesystem to filesystem and from kernel version to kernel version. You can't depend on "defaults" not including "acl", but you also can't depend on it being included. If you want to be sure, you'll have to specify it explicitly.


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The output of the mount command with no arguments is what the input of mount was when the filesystem was mounted (i.e., what its arguments were, what it detected the filesystem to be, and/or what was configured in /etc/fstab). The mount command expects at least three bits of information: the thing to mount, the place to mount it on, and the type of the ...


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It's possible the encrypted filesystem is toast. Hopefully not. Depending on what sorts of encryption options you chose, you may need slightly different commands. But you can try this to start. If it doesn't just work, looking at where it fails may help you debug your problem better. # cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sdb5 foo # mount /dev/mapper/foo /mnt You ...


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You can use lsblk to achieve what you are trying to do, in a somewhat roundabout fashion. The purpose of lsblk is to list attached block devices and provide some basic data about them. Two pieces of data that are of interest that it prints by default is the device node and the mount point. Assuming that you know the device node of the USB drive, you can ...


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Could be late, but was digging in the same problem and found the topic. Hope this will be usefull for someone too. Working excellent in Ubuntu 14.04: sudo -i mdadm --assemble --scan You will get: mdadm: /dev/md/1 has been started with 1 drive (out of 2) Then mount and see your files: cd /mnt && mkdir to-restore-md1 && mount /dev/md1 ...



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