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4

The command du will show you the disk space used by your files and directory. du -sh /home/* will show you the size of each subdirectory directly below the /home directory, afterwards depending on your preferences you might then: Either run the same command against one of these directories to manually step one level lower (for instance du -sh ...


3

Probably your NTFS volume is mounted with option noexec, which is the default enforced by permissions. See man ntfs-3g for details. You could selectively enable exec option by adding it to fstab. UUID=82440D36440D2F0B /media/federicop/Data ntfs-3g auto,users,permissions,exec 0 0 Run grep /media/federicop/Data /proc/mounts to know mount options actually ...


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See man fstab for the details on the fields. In short your line will be: //192.168.1.88/shares /mnt/share cifs username=USERNAME,password=PASSWD 0 0 See also man mount.cifs, especially the credentials= directive to keep the credentials apart from the fstab file.


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SysV Init The /etc/init.d/mountall.sh init script mounts local filesystems only: mount -a -t nonfs,nfs4,smbfs,cifs,ncp,ncpfs,coda,ocfs2,gfs,gfs2,ceph -O no_netdev Other filesystems are mounted by separate init scripts, like for example /etc/init.d/mountnfs.sh, which declare (via LSB headers) their dependency on $network. Thus these get scheduled later, ...


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You can do this with fstab, as long as you mark the mount as a network one. Just add _netdev to the options field.


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Your home folder contains two directories you own, /home/sougata and /home/sougatapc. The 182 GB you look for are these subdirectories plus possibly in an hidden one. To display hidden directories, use ls -la /home. On the other hand, unless you had a file system corruption and some files and directories were recovered with fsck, your lost+found directory ...


2

Firstly, you have your /dev/sdX numbers mixed up between your screenshot and your summary. Hence, the four partitions from df are /dev/sda4 mounted on / /dev/sda2 mounted on /boot /dev/sda1 mounted on /boot/efi /dev/sda3 mounted on /home /dev/sda1 is not empty; df shows it contains 191M. Type: Microsoft basic in the partition table ...


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I think that you are talking about assigning stable, persistent names to the hard drive device nodes, not about mounting them: make the hard drive with the UUID xyz to be mounted always on the node dev/sda? You cannot control which hard disk /dev/sda corresponds to at mount time. Once you are at the point of mounting a hard drive (or partition), the ...


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In an aufs union-mount, a branch and the mountpoint cannot be the same. Use this: mount -t aufs -o dirs=/mnt/home/lucyvanpelt=rw:/home/schroeder=ro none /path/to/mountpoint Normally if you want to merge 2 directories, you have to specify what should happen if something is written on it. As you can see, you can specify each branch with rw (readwrite) or ro ...


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You need to specify the filesystem when mouting. Try mount -t vfat /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 If you're format is fat32, mount -t ext2 /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 if it is ext2


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Your command is attempting to mount the device, rather than the partition. Instead of mount -t ext2 /dev/xvdb /mnt, try using: mount -t ext4 /dev/xvdb2 /mnt If you would like to automatically mount this partition at boot, you will also need to add the partition to your fstab file. You need to know the UUID of your disk, which you can find with ls -l ...


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If you're running the mount commands inside the chroots, then from the perspective of the outermost root, there will be proc filesystems mounted on /proc, …/mychroot1/proc and …/mychroot2/proc. There's no problem with that, you can access exactly the same files through any of the mount points. No “kicking off” is involved. A number of files under /proc ...


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Supposing your second HDD (160GB) is NTFS mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb /mnt/ Is there an error when you run this command?


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Since you listed /var/cache in /etc/fstab, a tmpfs filesystem is mounted to /var/cache during the boot sequence. Any contents of /var/cache are shadowed by the mount point. The files underneath a directory on which another filesystem is mounted still exist, but they can't be reached, since a path like /var/cache/foo goes into the other filesystem. For more ...


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The mount hides, or shadows, anything already present in the given directory (this may cause fun problems if the permissions are wrong on the thus shadowed dir). So when the tmpfs mount is removed, the original stuff will be there. (If the cache will need to persist, you could mv /var/cache /var/cache.save, and then do rsync things after the tmpfs is first ...


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Don't try to mount over /, make yourself a "new" (fake,read-only) one: I have done something similar. At the time I used AUFS, but this should also work with overlayfs and/or unionfs-fuse: make a folder (e.g.) ~/apps/_App1_FakeRoot Unionfs mount / (root) read-only under ~/apps/_App1 read-write on mountpoint ~/apps/_App1_FakeRoot. chroot into the FakeRoot, ...


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Why not use: isoinfo -R -X to extract all files or isoinfo -R -X -find find-options to extract files controlled by the find options?


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/etc/default/tmpfs is for sysvinit, for systemd (Debian jessie default) you only need to do: systemctl enable tmp.mount



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