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# rm -rf /path/to/undeletable rm: cannot remove ‘/path/to/undeletable’: Is a directory rm calls stat(2) to check whether /path/to/undeletable is a directory (to be deleted by rmdir(2)) or a file (to be deleted by unlink(2). Since the stat call fails (we'll see why in a minute), rm decides to use unlink, which explains the error message. # rmdir ...


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To disable the writing of access times, you need to mount the filesystem(s) in question with the noatime option. To mount an already mounted filesystem with the noatime option, do the following: mount /home -o remount,noatime To make the change permanent, update your /etc/fstab and add noatime to the options field. For example. Before: ...


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A BIOS boot partition doesn't contain a filesystem; it's just a place to put some GRUB code that on an MBR disk would've been located immediately after the boot sector, before the start of the first partition. On a GPT disk, that area is used by the (larger) partition table and isn't available for bootloader code, so the bootloader code goes in a small ...


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On Linux, you can now use the findmnt command from util-linux (since version 2.18): $ findmnt -S /dev/VG_SC/home TARGET SOURCE FSTYPE OPTIONS /home /dev/mapper/VG_SC-home ext4 rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered Or lsblk (also from util-linux, since 2.19): $ lsblk /dev/VG_SC/home NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT ...


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The tool looking inside an unmounted partition would need to interprete the filesystem's sturctures itself. Such tools exist for various filesystem (cpmtools, mtools, ...) and some filesystems have similar functionality primarily intended to be a debugging help (as example see debugfs). But why do you think, looking into the filesystem first is neccessary? ...


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Thanks to the comment by @mikeserv I've found out how to revive it. I have only tested this on Linux 4.0.7, so for much earlier or much later versions it may not work. mount /dev/pts -o remount,gid=5,mode=620 Mounting a devpts filesystem in a chroot without using the newinstance option caused it to mount the same "instance" of /dev/pts, containing the ...


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I have bad news for you: if I'm reading the code in http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/fs/efs/ correctly, Linux -- even the very newest version -- does not implement write access to EFS, probably because it was believed that the only use for a filesystem that old was to migrate data off of old disks.


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Is Filesystem the mount point? You could try the mount -o remount,rw -t efs /dev/sdb1 Filesystem option to remount the filesystem as read-write.


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Try umount -f /media/sdb1 or umount -l /media/sdb1. If all else fails you can manually edit /etc/mtab to remove the offending mount entry.


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Solution Add the following entry to your etc/fstab file: # device mountpoint fs-type options dump fsckorder ... ip.ip.ip.ip:/home /mnt nfs rw 0 0 ... Reference The Linux Documentation Project - 4.2. Getting NFS File Systems to Be Mounted at Boot Time


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Ensure you've recursively set the permissions to 777 after you've done the mount. Doing it before will have no effect. Also, please post the error you're getting. You might want to reconsider your choice of ext4 if you're using it as a removable drive. Frustratingly, there's still no option to ignore ownership and permissions on an ext4 filesystem. It's ...


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disks can be mounted on any directories, there are however pitfall. all disk must be mounted before application (e.g. drupal) is started. "deepest" directories must be mounted last (e.g mount /storage/drupalprivate/ before /storage/drupalprivate/data1 ). any existing file or dir under /storage/drupalprivate/data1 on your SSD disk, will be unavailable/hide ...


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Are you using a cluster environment? If yes, please check if the device has been using by another node. Also please make sure /dev/sda2 has a correct format. The "df" command only shows which are already mounted.


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If nfs mount does not resides in fstab, means it is a temporary mount (lost after reboot). You can use df -h to check the mount point, if the first column is a hostname/ip, then it must be an nfs mount. # df -h ... 192.168.1.2:/ora_share 300G 206G 88G 71% /ora


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On a linux system you can use findmnt: set '' for r in /* do findmnt "$r" || ! set '' "$r$@" && ls "$r" done That command will do the ls for the other mounts, and all of the / root-mount filenames are available in $@ when you're ready. So to list those you'd do: ls "$@"


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Try file -sL /dev/sdXY. Will give you some limited information without mounting the filesystem. $ file -sL /dev/sdc1 /dev/sdc1: Linux rev 1.0 ext2 filesystem data (mounted or unclean), UUID=aa84c5a8-6418-4952-b577-578f2a67af86, volume name "music" $


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Yes. You can see Showing Only Interesting Mount Points/Filtering Non-Interesting Types or Listing Directories under / that are Not Under the Same Mountpoint for some example usage, but there's also a brief rundown below. The command you are asking about is findmnt (though lsblk might also serve): lsblk -f /dev/sda[12] NAME FSTYPE LABEL UUID ...


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I don't know of a clean and simple way to detect whether or not a device node in /dev is mounted. This is what I can offer, though. It handles directly mounted devices (/dev/sda1) and devices mounted by UUID (/dev/disk/by-uuid/aa4e7b08-6547-4b5a-85ad-094e9e1af74f). It breaks if your device names contain whitespace. deviceIsMounted() { local DEVICE="$1" ...



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