Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

mount is a command, i.e. a program, i.e. userspace code. mount is a system call, i.e. kernel code. The mount command calls the mount system call to do the bulk of its job. In addition, it performs auxiliary tasks such as parsing its command line, consulting /etc/fstab, etc.


4

Using mv for a file or folder within an NFS mount will apply the operation remotely. (See this list of API functions or this overview.) This example will execute almost immediately regardless of the size of the file, provided that dir1 and dir2 are part of the same mountpoint: mv /mnt/serverInEurope/dir1/file.txt /mnt/serverInEurope/dir2/file.txt Using mv ...


3

I would gate access to the filesystem through a directory that contains the mount point. As root: mkdir -p /media/group1only/workspace chgrp group1 /media/group1only chmod 750 /media/group1only This is full access to root and read+execute access for members of group1. Don't give them write access here, since if they accidentally rename the workspace ...


3

Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


3

There used to be an option to check ext2 filesystems at mount time, but that is no longer supported. Nowadays boot scripts check filesystems before mounting them, and your scripts should do so too. Mounting a filesystem does still check things to make sure it's safe to mount the filesystem; but it won't fix anything (beyond replaying the journal on ext3 or ...


3

Incorrect POSIX permissions It means you don't have the execute permission bit set for script.sh. When running bash script.sh, you only need read permission for script.sh. See What is the difference between running “bash script.sh” and “./script.sh”? for more info. You can verify this by running ls -l script.sh. You may not even need to start a new Bash ...


2

Volume group name should be unique on system, by design. Problem occurs when a disk is moved from a system to another. So you have few options (detailed below) rename the VG on the external [not mounted] disk(s). rename the VG of your system (not realistic) merge both volume group into a single one (probably needs to rename first) option 1 - rename the ...


2

My first comment is all of what you state will only work if the filesystem on the device you're interested in is currently mounted. But I guess you know that and accept that limitation. The method you propose seems quite thorough and I think it will catch all cases. About looking ip in /sys/dev/block: You're not looking for <maj>:0 as you state. ...


2

There is not a -o force mount option for (v)FAT. A safe alternative is to image the sdcard and then do an fsck on the image. dd if=/dev/sdb1 of=~/sdcard.image dosfsck -l -w -a -r -v -t ~/sdcard.image mount -t vfat -o loop,ro ~/sdcard.image /mnt/sdcard


2

If the filesystem type is one that doesn't have permissions, such as FAT, you can add umask, gid and uid to the fstab options. For example: /dev/sdb1 /media/workspace auto defaults,uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=022 0 1 uid=1000 is the user id. gid=1000 is the group id. umask=022 this will set permissions so that the owner has read, write, execute. Group and ...


2

Your root filesystem is squashfs, which saves some flash space by compressing everything, but as a result is read-only. You can not mount it read-write. Instead, you reflash the device with a new squashfs image. If you need writable storage, you have to partition your flash and mount a second, writable filesystem, of which there are several intended for use ...


2

Use lsblk to list block devices. It's likely that '/dev/sr0' is a read-only-media (rom) device. That should be what you seek.


1

When you mount a FUSE filesystem, by default, only the user doing the mounting can access it. You can override this by adding the allow_other mount option, but this is a security risk if the filesystem wasn't designed for it (and most filesystems accessed via FUSE aren't): what are the file permissions going to allow other users to do? Furthermore only root ...


1

You still need to format the logical volume with some kind of filesystem. LVM just gets you to the point where you have one resizable volume instead of two fixed size volumes. Example: # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vol_grp1/logical_vol1 After that, try your mount command again.


1

For example, assuming the filesystem on the disk supports ACL's, and using the hypothetical user, myusername, and the hypothetical group for accessing the disk, diskusers, something like the following could be done. $ indicated a command executed as a regular user; # indicates a command executed as the user, root. Create a group to which a user may belong ...


1

Shadowing files on a directory tree is what union mounts are all about. Linux offers several union filesystems; unfortunately, some are badly documented or unmaintained. For your use case, a FUSE-based solution that doesn't require privileges seems best. The most promising candidate would be unionfs-fuse. unionfs-fuse ...


1

Unmount the USB-drive and open up a new terminal. First get the device name with: sudo fdisk -l (Example: /dev/sdb1) Create new a mount point: sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb Then mount the USB-drive back on with ownership set to you: sudo mount -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb/ In the command above, the only thing you have to change is the ...


1

You don't mount Audio CDs. You can read about it here Mount CD ROM in Linux at 4. Mounting Audio CD chapter. In order to listen to a music CD all what needs to be done is to insert music CD ( Compact Dics ) into CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive and fire up you favorite music CD player. In order to listen to Audio CD you can refer to this article Mplayer: Play ...


1

You could try to use these commands in the terminal: mkdir /mnt/cd && mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Else try this in the terminal: sudo mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if mkdir works: mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if the directory has already been created: sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd ...


1

I'm sorry, but in all likelihood, the files were never written to the disk. Thus no recovery effort will help, even if you were willing to pay. Unmounting flushes the content of the disk write buffers from memory to the disk. If the buffers aren't flushed, the data is still only in memory, not on the disk. If you pulled the disk out while a write from ...


1

First thing to do is mount /mnt on tmpfs. In /etc/fstab tmpfs /mnt tmpfs size=1M 0 0 That really should solve your initial problem (but I'm sure you'll have more to come!)


1

There are two types of filesystem drivers: kernel or userland. Kernel filesystem drivers are the classical type. They are faster, but since they run kernel code, it is hard to control what they do. For this reason, by default only the system administrator (the root user) can mount a filesystem using a kernel filesystem driver. The administrator can ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible