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5

The drive names are (on a typical Linux system) decided by udev.How it decides which hardware maps to which block special file is an implementation detail that will depend your udev configuration, kernel configuration, module setup, and many other things, too (including plain luck). Typically udev will assign the first letter to whichever device it detects ...


4

You're looking in the wrong place, because this isn't really to do with the mount command itself. What you're doing is mounting a special filesystem, in this case, a cgroups hierarchy, and the options happen to be how you attach different cgroup subsystems like cpu or memory. Red Hat* has some good documentation on cgroups in general and the mount options ...


4

Because any directory is valid mountpoint The content of the latest mounted share will be listed AFAIK you cannot. The latest mount will be unmounted firstly # mkdir testmount # mount --bind /bin/ testmount/ # mount --bind /usr/bin/ testmount/ # mount |grep testmount /bin on /testmount type none (rw,bind) /usr/bin on /testmount type none ...


3

du is for disk usage; it is showing that you are using 100G. Rather than du, use df -h; it will report used and available space.


3

du shows occupied space. To show the total, use df.


3

I think mount does not support this use of user with the default fuse security setting (or allow_root). I think the resulting permissions are the same as if you used sudo mount. To allow access by multiple non-root users, you could set allow_other, allowing access by any user. If this raised concerns, it would be possible to set default_permissions to ...


2

Looking in /media is a reasonable way to find hotplug block devices. You can also use lsblk to list the block devices and whether they are hotpluggable: $ lsblk -l -p -o name,rm,hotplug,mountpoint NAME RM HOTPLUG MOUNTPOINT /dev/sda 0 0 /dev/sda1 0 0 / /dev/sda2 0 0 [SWAP] /dev/sda3 0 0 /home /dev/sdc 0 1 ...


2

PLEASE NOTE If you already have the Debian 8 version of VirtualBox installed this may not work. If you need VirtualBox installed and working for other virtual images this may break that. You can manually install the wheezy versions of the required packages. Download the following .debs for your architecture: libgsoap2 virtualbox virtualbox-fuse Use ...


2

When a child process is created with clone with the CLONE_NEWNS flag, the child process gets its own mount namespace. Mounting operations (mount, umount, mount --bind, etc.) in the child namespace only have an effect inside that namespace, and mount operations in the parent namespace only have an effect outside the new namespace. Except, that is, for shared ...


1

So I made a mountinfo parser […] You're better off using setmntent() and getmntent() that are provided in the GNU C runtime library. My approach was to convert the mount options into the appropriate mountflags and to give special options straight to data […] What you need to do is take the mnt_opts given to you by getmntent() and ...


1

Some of the parameters given to mount(8) are translated to flags specified in the mountflags parameter to mount(2): sync is MS_SYNCHRONOUS; dirsync is MS_DIRSYNC; relatime is MS_RELATIME; rw is the default, so it can't be specified; ro would be MS_RDONLY.


1

Finally found the answer from somebody else on another site, just zeroed the inodes and rechecked the system, that was all! debugfs -w /dev/sda2 :clri <1415> :clri <1416> :clri <1417> :q fsck -y /dev/sda2 To anybody else with this issue, I found my bad inodes using find on the bad mount, then checked dmesg for errors on the bad inodes.


1

This appears to be a bug in older versions of LVM. A bug that could be corrected by compiling from source with a different set of flags to add support for thin devices. I can not speak for the SystemRescueCD you mentioned, because I have never used it, but it may be using an older version of LVM, for whatever reason, which may have this very bug. Since ...


1

You need to install ntfs-3g and fuse : yum -y install ntfs-3g yum install fuse modprobe fuse Create a mount point : mkdir /mnt/win Now , run the following command: mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/win


1

First check if the usb is detected at all. Let's give you an example... Without connecting the USB pendrive: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT mtdblock0 31:0 0 16M 0 disk mtdblock1 31:1 0 7.5G 0 disk / Now with the pendrive connected: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT ...


1

Generic FUSE options 1) I noticed allow_other wasn't set on the ntfs-3g filesystem mount. The default for FUSE is not to allow access by other users. mhddfs is a FUSE filesystem and so is ntfs-3g (but see next section). 2) When you use allow_other, you also want to consider permissions checking. The default for FUSE is not to check permissions. So just ...


1

This is because the device files you find in /dev aren't actually mount points *. They're just handy filesystem-based references to access the devices themselves. You can see a similar sort of hierarchy under /sys — particularly, look in /sys/block. Why is something like /dev/sda a special type of file rather than a directory under which there are ...


1

I believe Unix V1 would be run from a single disk. It had no real VFS. You can find the system filesystem at the root of the namespace, /. No indirection required; no SYSTEMROOT = c:/windows variable. Remember this was hand-written assembly code. Minimalist ideas were very useful. The ideas here are often described in terms of their elegance. I want to run ...


1

It is possible to modify a squashfs image without extracting its contents, but there are limitations. If you specify an existing squashfs image as the destination parameter for mksquashfs, without specifying the -noappend option, it will attempt to add additional files from the specified source parameters. It appears that mksquashfs attempts to generate a ...


1

You can use GNU stat on Linux: stat --file-system --format=%T /tmp/subdir/whatever tmpfs


1

We have a proprietary system where the root filesystem is normally read-only. Occasionally, when files have to be copied over, it is remounted read-write: mount -oremount,rw / And then remounted back: mount -oremount,ro / This time however, mount kept giving the mount: / is busy error. It was caused by a process holding an open descriptor to a file ...



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