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58

This is all due to the fact that the X server is out-dated, ill-suitable for today's graphics hardware and basically all the direct video card communication is done as an extension ("patch") over the ancient bloated core. The X server provides no builtin means of synchronization between user rendering the window and the screen displaying a window, so the ...


11

Screen tearing appears mostly because of two reasons - drivers that aren't there yet, and lack of vsync with certain window managers. As for drivers, both free and proprietary drivers support free-tearing compositing (nvidia and amd both). Be aware that e.g. enabling tear-free desktop in catalyst (fglrx) may cause frame drop and lags, so it is usually ...


11

This was tested on a laptop with a i915 drived graphic card. Definitively, in my config/install, there are not. :-( When a new screen is plugged, no event is sent to the host! (This stay true after my last edit!) So the only way is to use pooling... Trying to make them lighter as possible... Last Edit : Finaly there is one better solution (through ...


11

Okay, so, the answer is that the redshift program, pointed out by St├ęphane Gimenez in a comment above, can do this pretty simply. It's meant to do a clever adjust-white-point-over-the-day thing, but it can also be made to do one-time adjustments with the -o flag. The desired color temperature in Kelvin must be given twice because of the time-based features, ...


10

How about x windows? Can you set up xinerama for 6 screens? Or make it able to drag x windows? The current Xorg limit is 16 display devices, but a multi-head card will typically be treated as a single device unless you want separate logical displays (not Xinerama-style).


9

Your laptop should have /sys/class/backlight. For example, /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness. You can write (echo) values to this file to adjust brightness. cat /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/max_brightness > /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness This will set the brightness to max. Just put it in an init script on boot.


8

This seems to be a known bug and you can read more detail on launchpad as well as on ubuntuforums. The issue is that somehow gnome-power-manager and the xset commands conflict with each other. The solution is to run xset dpms force off in a loop, a python script pretty much works for most of us. Give it a try, and see how it goes.


7

Your desktop environment probably has a way, but you don't say which one you're using (if any). If your display driver is compatible with the XRandR extension, which is the standard X.org method for managing display resolutions and arrangements, you can use the command-line utility xrandr. I think the proprietary NVidia driver bypasses XRandR, so if you're ...


7

xset dpms force off works for most X setups.


7

In Ubuntu's Monitor Preferences, it is identified as Viewsonic Corporation 16". How can I extract this human readable form? That human readable form ("Viewsonic Corporation") does not come (directly) from your EDID: Ubuntu uses gnome libraries underneath. libgnome-desktop decodes the edid and - via pnp-ids - converts the three-letter vendor ID ("VSC" ...


7

Why is it called eDP1? Because it is an embedded display port style adapter, and not a video graphics array style one.


6

Device files on Unix systems in general are just one way for user programs to access device drivers; there isn't a one-to-one mapping from devices files to physical hardware, and not all hardware has a device file (or even a device driver). The kernel itself doesn't use device files to interact with hardware. As pointed out by lcd047, network cards don't ...


5

The xrandr command is the one you are looking for. An example usage is: xrandr --output HDMI1 --auto --same-as LVDS1 You can have --left-of, --right-of. Run xrandr on its own to see the different outputs that are available.


5

You can use vbetool to turn the display on/off from the console. off: $ sudo vbetool dpms off on: $ sudo vbetool dpms on This command construct will turn it off, and then if you hit a key turn it back on: $ sudo sh -c 'vbetool dpms off; read ans; vbetool dpms on' References [SOLVED] How to turn off monitor at CLI Turn off monitor using command ...


5

Try: find /proc /sys | grep -ie brightness -e light -e lux -e lumin On this laptop (a MacBookPro), it reveals (among other things): /sys/devices/platform/applesmc.768/light which is neither over PCI or USB. You could try the same after sudo modprobe -a tsl2550 isl29003 isl29020 apds9802als apds990x bh1770glc bh1780gli which are drivers for various ...


4

This question really belongs back on raspberrypi.stackexchange.com because it's a Raspberry Pi-specific issue: the kernel framebuffer driver for the Raspberry Pi does not support the function that X uses to put the monitor to sleep: https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/issues/487 Until this issue is fixed, it won't be possible for X to put the monitor to ...


4

I have used arandr, this utility allows to save a script configuring your two screens. (I know there is also the utilityxrandr but I have not used it.) I have added this script to my startup in fluxbox (I don't know where to put it for openbox) so each time a session is started, my two monitors get configured. I don't understand what you mean with desktop ...


4

Disable X11 forwarding (using -x switch to ssh) and set the DISPLAY environment variable for machine B. For example, this will tell you the settings for :0 on machine B: ssh -x machineB DISPLAY=:0 xrandr


4

I'm not sure you are going to get the results you want from a test program. I've worked at a company that produced consumer electronics and the test facility there had several environmental units that would simulate scenarios like this that would cause failures. One was just a simple box with a heating element that would allow you to put electronics in it ...


4

There is hardware calibration available for Linux, if you can find the hardware to do so. The Sp*der 1 and 2 are allegedly supported. The Sp*der 3 maybe. Here is an article on using the Pantone Huey (another inexpensive device that is actually supported on Linux). The X-Rite Eye-One Display is also supposedly supported, but can find no instructive ...


4

X11 can adjust gamma with the command xgamma, which should come standard with X11 on most Linux distros. This works independent of what monitor you use. The proprietary drivers for some graphics cards offer GUI gamma adjustments.


4

There is a tool called read-edid doing exactly what its name suggests.


4

You found the command yourself, you just need to parse it For example: $ xrandr -q | grep -Po 'current\s*\d+\s*x\s*\d+' | awk '{print $1/$3}' The regular expression looks for current, then 0 or more white space characters (\s*), then one or more digits (\d+) followed by \s*, then x, then \s* and finally more digits. The \K simply discards anything that ...


4

With xrandr you can affect the gamma and brightness of a display by altering RGB values. From man xrandr: --brightness Multiply the gamma values on the crtc currently attached to the output to specified floating value. Useful for overly bright or overly dim outputs. However, this is a software only modification, if your hardware has support to ...


4

You're looking for headless with X. It's little bit described on ArchWiki, there's shown a way how to do this. There's another alternative to run headless X11 compatible server: Xvfb(X virtual framebuffer). It's a display server that performs all graphical operations in memory without showing any screen output. startx is just front-end for xinit which ...


3

I had a strong tearing here and now it is solved. After reading this (wonderful explanation) of how an Xorg server works I realized that X server paints window updates directly to the memory card at any random time unless you use a compositing enabled window manager. When compositing is enabled the window manager put together all the changes from the ...


3

Alright, well, I figured it out (sort of). I'll post the answer about the crash here in case someone googles this same issue. I don't exactly know why Cinnamon is crashing, but I've read somewhere that you cannot have two X screens running at the same time due to some 3D-acceleration nonsense. What this means is, both monitors are plugged into the same ...


3

You can do so by modifying the Xorg.conf by adding the line Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor1" Option "Rotate" "left" EndSection or after login use the xrandr command as: xrandr --output DVI-2 --rotate left Replace DVI-2 and left as per your requirement xrandr solution will be effective till session exist. On reboot, ...


3

use vidcontrol MODE_xxx For example to have a screen 1024x768x24, in the console : # vidcontrol MODE_280 To know which mode you can be interested in, in the console : # vidcontrol -i mode The left column gives you the number you have to put after MODE_


3

You can try xrandr tool. First run xrandr --verbose and look for a line with resolution like LVDS1 connected 1024x600+0+0. The name of your display (LVDS1 in this example) is needed here. Now you are ready to set brightness: xrandr --output LVDS1 --brightness 0.4 xrandr sets software, not hardware brightness so you can exceed both upper and lower limits: ...



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