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6

Read the documentation about Submitting Drivers as well as about Submitting Patches: You can find the appropriate address in the MAINTAINERS file You driver must be licensed under GPL but you can dual-license it, e.g. put it under GPL and a BSD license.


5

lsmod lists all loaded modules, and has a Used by column. If that is 0 for module A, then no other loaded module has a dependency on it. This does not mean that removing the module is safe. There is no way that I can think of that you could determine if a module is "in use". Device driver modules will (usually) increase their Used by count when they are ...


4

As far as I know, there is no speed difference. I think you will gain a few kB of kernel memory as the granularity of allocations is one page, so on typical architecture each module wastes an average of about 2kB (½ page) per would-be module. Even on embedded systems, that's hardly significant. You also gain a little disk space as the modules can be ...


4

It depends. If you have a small amount of memory, the use of modules may improve the resume as they are not reloaded every time (I found it significant on 2 GiB of RAM but not on 4 GiB on traditional harddrives). This is especially true when due to some bug in the battery module (regardless of being compiled-in or as module), it took very long to start ...


4

Your rc.conf is not properly configured; the elipses (...) in the wiki are illustrative only. The rc.conf file is a shell script and arrays shouldn't contain those dots. Using that method is the deprecated way of loading modules. If you wish to continue to list them in this file, then you should use this format: MODULES=(wl lib80211 nvidia-bl) The correct ...


3

dm_mirror is a Linux kernel module. Therefore better search the kernel.org website. kernel.org "dm_mirror site:kernel.org" returns loads of less relevant results. The search query "dm_mirror -bugzilla site:kernel.org" does a better job. One of these search engine results links to https://www.kernel.org/doc/menuconfig/frv.html. That document links to ...


3

This was disabled in the 3.11 build of the debian package. From the package's changelog: Disable parport drivers that are no longer likely to be useful: block: Disable PARIDE media: Disable VIDEO_BWQCAM, VIDEO_CQCAM, VIDEO_W9966 SCSI: Disable SCSI_IMM, SCSI_PPA This means the the maintainer no longer felt that Iomega Zip drive support ...


3

With a monolithic kernel, in theory a single contiguous block of memory can be allocated for the kernel. If modules are loaded (and unloaded) on demand, then it's improbable that all kernel memory will be contiguous, and hence by definition it will be fragmented. The trade off is that a modular kernel will usually use far less memory that a monolithic ...


3

I found it - but it's bad news, unfortunately. Here's what Documentation/networking/bonding.txt file for 2.4.37.11 says: It is recommended to configure the driver as module sinceit is currently the only way to pass parameters to the driverand configure more than one bonding device. So no module = no changing of parameters in this case. Sorry.


3

I suspect your VirtualHost is not getting processed correctly, which would then not set AllowOverride for the get requests. First your /etc/hosts file should look like this.. 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain 127.0.1.1 nibble.local Second, You must have that interface set for namebased vhosts. You did not specify if you have it currently ...


2

If you are looking for the driver-specific parameters, there's several places you can find information. Hopefully there is some information in the kernel documentation. This is great for some stuff, sparse for others, and totally not there for most drivers. Run modinfo (maybe with -F param or -F parm), which hopefully will give helpful one-line ...


2

I found an answer here: http://bugs.gentoo.org/show_bug.cgi?format=multiple&id=192391 And it works! :-) It changes APR_XtOffsetOf to APR_OFFSETOF in the .c file. Patch which solves the problem: --- mod_auth_mysql.c.orig 2007-09-13 09:36:14.000000000 +0200 +++ mod_auth_mysql.c 2007-09-13 09:41:49.000000000 +0200 @@ -589,87 +589,87 @@ static ...


2

For your module, normally you'd normally put that in /etc/modprobe.conf but you can also put it in /etc/rc.modules. For your script, if you want to just execute it once when the server boots, it can be put in /etc/rc.d/rc.local (although it is also executed when changing run levels). If you're looking for a more complex service you can start and stop or ...


2

Sometimes it's necessary. If you compile some vital driver (e.g. SCSI driver) as a module your system won't boot. Another great candidate for not compiling as a module is the filesystem type of the root partition. If the kernel doesn't understand ext3 to read /lib/modules/ how will it load modules from it ? Think about it this way: to use modules the ...


2

Yes, the reason that essential components (such as mm) cannot be loadable modules is because they are essential -- the kernel will not work without them. I can't find any references claiming the effects of memory fragmentation with regard to loadable modules is significant, but this part of the LLKM how-to might be interesting reading for you. I think the ...


2

I don't know what other disadvantages there might be to compiling code as a loadable kernel module rather than directly into the kernel image, but to use your particular example, suppose that memory management was built as a kernel module rather than built into the kernel binary image itself. How would the kernel allocate the memory for an initial RAM ...


2

It doesn't need to python setup.py build , When you download by hand a module you should do it, however if you use install pip system , you don't need to use the given command. in debian-base systems you can see the following formula: python-modulename #python2 python3-modulename #python3 But if you didn't find in debian repository, you can download ...


1

For the majority of cases, you can use ldd to determine the libraries an executable is linked against. For example: # ldd /usr/bin/xz linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007fff06358000) liblzma.so.5 => /lib64/liblzma.so.5 (0x00007fd6a1358000) libpthread.so.0 => /lib64/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007fd6a1138000) libc.so.6 => /lib64/libc.so.6 (0x00007fd6a0d88000) ...


1

Given the issue of module dependencies that make blacklisting a module like that difficult, I would suggest the route of recompiling your kernel with that subsystem explicitly not built. As you mention you are running Debian Wheezy, this guide is a good primer on building a kernel the "debian way". I generally advocate using the latest stable kernel ...


1

It would appear that there is a bz2module.c that comes with the Python 2.4 source, but does not appear to be compiled by default and there is nothing in Modules/Setup for it. Likely because the development package for bz2 is not installed by default. Try to find the bzlib.h file on your system: $ find /usr/include -name bzlib.h If that does not exist, ...


1

Ok, I have figured out the problem. I am having square bracket character "[" in the module source directory LD [M] /home/farshad/Work/CSP/boards/imx6q/ar6k3/ar6003_3.1_RC_Linux_release_[posted_2011_8_19_olca3.1RC_553/imx6build/host/os/linux/ar6000.o Removing this from the path worked well and I got my kernel module object files. I have renamed ...


1

There is no recorded association. You need to explore the makefiles in the kernel source. You'll find lines like obj-$(CONFIG_FUSION_SAS) += mptbase.o mptscsih.o mptsas.o This means that: If CONFIG_FUSION_SAS is y, then the drivers mptbase, mptscsih and mptsas are compiled into the kernel. If CONFIG_FUSION_SAS is m, then the drivers mptbase, ...


1

As far as I know, there is no way to load any module at boot. The kernel first needs to be loaded ... which will not happen if I understand correctly your problem. All you can do from a boot menu is sent parameters to the kernel, but that's all. If you can't load the kernel itself you do not really have any option. However, maybe you could boot into a live ...


1

The Module.symvers is (re)generated when you (re)compile modules. Run make modules, and you should get a Module.symvers file at the root of the kernel tree. Note that if you only ran make and not make modules, you haven't built any modules yet. The symbols from the kernel itself (vmlinux or one of the architecture-dependent image formats) are in System.map. ...


1

There's no fundamental difference between Android and other Linux platforms. To build a module, you need kernel headers and a few files that are generated during the kernel compilation. These files depend on the kernel configuration. Typical Linux distributions ship with a package containing these kernel headers and other files, to make it easier to build ...


1

Yes, of course there is insmod for Android because Android is based on a normal Linux kernel. The answers to this question will be the same as for any other Linux kernel. And also just like any other cross-compile situation you will need to compile your module against the kernel source and options of the kernel on your devices as well as for the right ...


1

What do you mean by unused? The fact that a module is shown by lsmod means that probably there was a good reason to load it. In order to find modules that are compiled, but not used, you could compare the output of lsmod with /lib/modules for your kernel version.


1

A couple potential benefits. Performance is an arguable one. You'd avoid some runtime overhead associated with a dynamic loader, but I doubt that's a big deal unless you're depending on a real-time scheduler. If you're taking advantage of large pages on your system, then perhaps creating a larger static kernel image means you make more efficient use of the ...



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